What Are The Holidays Of Islam? (TOP 5 Tips)

Islamic Holidays and Observances

  • Al-Hijra — Islamic New Year. Marks the end of Mohammad’s journey from Mecca to Medina.
  • Eid ul-Adha — Festival of Sacrifice.
  • Eid ul-Fitr — End of Muslim Month of Fasting (Ramadan).
  • Prophet’s Birthday — Celebration of the birth of the Prophet Muhammad.
  • Ramadan — Muslim Month of Fasting.

What are the most important holidays in Islam?

  • Ramadan. Each year,corresponding with the ninth month of the lunar calendar,Muslims spend a month in daytime fasting.
  • Laylat al-Qadr.
  • Eid al-Fitr.
  • Hajj.
  • Day of Arafat.
  • Eid al-Adha.
  • Other Muslim Holy Days.
  • Islamic New Year: 1 Muharram.
  • Ashura: 10 Muharram.
  • Mawlid an-Nabi: 12 Rabia’ Awal.

Contents

How many Islamic holidays are there?

There are two official holidays in Islam, Eid al-Fitr and Eid al-Adha.

What is the biggest holiday in Islam?

Nearly 1.6 billion Muslims around the world celebrate Eid al-Adha (the Feast of Sacrifice) and it’s the celebration of one central figure in Islam, Judaism, and Christianity: the prophet Abraham. So in honor of this day, here are eight things you should know about this Muslim holiday.

Why are festivals important in Islam?

The festival is a reminder of Allah’s blessings and shows how important it is to obey Allah’s will. This was a test of Ibrahim’s loyalty to Allah. On the first morning of Id-ul-Adha, Muslims around the world attend morning prayers at their local mosque. The service includes communal prayers and a sermon.

Does Islam celebrate Christmas?

“Islam teaches to respect others’ values and culture. As Muslims, we don’t celebrate Christmas but as a member of the Ahmadiyya Muslim community, we help people attend church services, take part in food drives and try to help and play a part in the joy of those individuals who are celebrating alone.

Who is the founder of Islam?

The rise of Islam is intrinsically linked with the Prophet Muhammad, believed by Muslims to be the last in a long line of prophets that includes Moses and Jesus.

What are the two main Islamic festivals?

The word ‘Eid’ means ‘feast’ or ‘festival’. Each year Muslims celebrate both Eid al-Fitr and Eid al-Adha – but the names often get shortened to just ‘Eid’, which is why it can be confusing.

What are the two most important holidays in Islam?

Muslims annually observe two major holidays: Eid al-Fitr and Eid al-Adha.

Do Muslims use toilet paper?

Turkey’s top religious authority has decreed that Muslims may use toilet paper – though water is still preferable for cleansing. “If water cannot be found for cleansing, other cleaning materials can be used. Islamic toilet etiquette, called the Qadaa al-Haajah, contains rules that predate the invention of toilet paper.

Can Muslims celebrate Diwali?

She stated, “ No, we never celebrated Diwali. Another person underlined how Diwali is ‘haram’ (forbidden)in Islam. He emphasised, “People like you must be celebrating, we believe in Allah and His Messenger, it is haram to adopt the festival and character of other religion.

Can Muslims celebrate birthdays?

Birthdays are a cultural tradition. Muslims do not celebrate Christmas like Christians. Other Muslims may not celebrate birthdays for cultural reasons because it does not say in the Quran or in valid hadith that we can not celebrate birthdays. Some Muslims don’t celebrate birthdays.

Islamic holidays – Wikipedia

As part of the climax of His creative effort, God created Adam on the sixth day (Friday) of creation, according to the tale of creation recorded in the book of Genesis in the Holy Bible. His labor was completed on the seventh day, as stated in the Bible: “And God blessed the seventh day, making it holy, for on that day He rested.” As a result, for millennia, the Jews have observed Saturday as a holy day dedicated solely to worship, with no interruptions from ordinary duties. Following in the footsteps of the early Christians, who were themselves a community of practicing Jews living in Palestine, With the rise of the Roman Empire in Christianity, it was decided that Sunday should be the day of rest and worship, which became the first day of each week.

This day is referred to as the “day of the Lord” in several Romance languages.

Adam is commemorated as the unifier, who, as the perfect creature in the image of God, knows and names the rest of creation, bringing them all into a state of cosmic harmony.

Regarding this paradise, the Holy Qur’an says, ” “No hunger or nakedness will be experienced by thee in this place since it has been prepared for thee.

In this sense, he is responsible to God, and people are endowed with the right to food, drink, clothes, and shelter, which is granted by God to all creatures.

As a result, the ultimate oneness of God given by Islam predicates the unity of God’s mission from the beginning, when Adam, the first prophet, brought humanity together under one banner.

In this age, humans will be able to meet all of their wants and contribute to the creation of a peaceful society due to their God-given ability to comprehend and understand the elements.

On the occasion of Hajj, when the Holy Prophet was surrounded by nearly 100,000 of his supporters on Mount Arafat on a Friday, God Almighty revealed to him the following verse: “This day have I finalized your religion for you and completed My favor upon you, and have selected Islam as your religion.” In this way, Friday commemorates the day when Adam began building the citadel of religion around 6,000 years ago, and when the Holy Prophet, approximately 1,400 years ago on a Friday, completed the work that Adam had started.

In order to honor God and to glorify Him, it is unquestionably necessary to commemorate this day. Hameed Naseem is the president of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community’s branch in Tulsa, Oklahoma. [email protected] is the best way to reach him. 06/22/2019 – Religion – NAN

Holidays

It is customary for Muslims to conduct acts of zakat (charity) on the occasion of Eid al-Fitr, which takes place at the conclusion of Ramadan (a month of fasting during daylight hours), which begins when the new moon is sighted at the beginning of the month of Shawwal. Prayers are held first thing in the morning on the first of Shawwal, followed by breakfast and, more often than not, festive feasts throughout the day. Eid al-Adha is observed on the tenth day of Dhu al-Hijjah, which coincides with the start of the Hajj pilgrimage, and lasts for four days in total.

During this time, Muslims are also encouraged to be particularly kind and reach out to one another.

Religious practices

During the holy month of Ramadan, the Fanoos, also known as Fanoos Ramadan, is a lantern that is used to illuminate houses, mosques, and streets. When the Quran was revealed to Muhammad, Muslims commemorate the occasion by fasting from dawn to sunset throughout Ramadan, the ninth month of the Islamic calendar. Islam views fasting as a cleansing practice that allows Muslims to learn compassion for one another and increase their trust in Allah. Although they are already hungry, those who are fasting for Ramadan are representing the plight of others who are less fortunate.

Exemptions from fasting are granted to travelers, as well as to women who are menstruation or breastfeeding a child.

The practice of fasting can be rendered ineffective if a person engages in religiously prohibited behaviors such as Ghibah (backbiting others) or deception of others.

Pilgrimage

Hajj is the main article.

Umrah

The Islamic calendar is based on the synodic period (about 291 2 days) of the Moon’s movement around the Earth. The Islamic calendar alternates between months with 29 and 30 days in length, as seen below (which begin with the new moon). In the Islamic calendar, a year is comprised of twelve months, which is 11 days shorter than the Gregorian calendar. Some Gregorian dates may differ somewhat from the ones provided, and they may also differ from one country to another. See Islamic calendar for further information.

Holiday name Hijri date 1443 AH 1444 AH 1445 AH
Islamic New Year 1 Muḥarram 9 Aug. 2021 30 July 2022 19 July 2023
Ashura 10 Muḥarram 18 Aug. 2021 8 Aug. 2022 28 July 2023
Arbaʽeen 20 or 21 Ṣafar 27 Sep. 2021 17 Sep. 2022 6 Sep. 2023
Eid-e-Shuja'(Eid-e-Zahra) 9 Rabī‘ al-Awwal 15 Oct. 2021 5 Oct. 2022 24 Sep. 2023
Mawlid an-Nabī(‘Birthday of the Prophet’) 12 Rabī‘ al-Awwal 18 Oct. 2021 8 Oct. 2022 27 Sep. 2023
Birthday of‘Alī ibn Abī Ṭālib 13 Rajab 14 Feb. 2022 4 Feb. 2023 25 Jan. 2024
Laylat al-Mi’raj 27 Rajab 28 Feb. 2022 18 Feb. 2023 8 Feb. 2024
Laylat al-Bara’at 15 Sha‘bān 18 Mar. 2022 7 Mar. 2023 25 Feb. 2024
Birthday ofHujjat-Allah al-Mahdī 15 Sha‘bān 18 Mar. 2022 7 Mar. 2023 25 Feb. 2024
First day ofRamaḍān 1 Ramaḍān 2 Apr. 2022 23 Mar. 2023 11 Mar. 2024
Laylat al-Qadr 19, 21, 23, 25, 27, or 29 Ramaḍān between 2030 Apr. 2022 between 1020 Apr. 2023 between 29 Mar.8 Apr. 2024
Chaand Raat 29 or 30 Ramaḍān 1 May 2022 20 Apr. 2023 9 Apr. 2024
Eid al-Fitr 1 Shawwāl 2 May 2022 21 Apr. 2023 10 Apr. 2024
Hajj 8–13 Dhū al-Ḥijja 7–12 July 2022 26 June – 1 July 2023 14–19 June 2024
Day of Arafah 9 Dhū al-Ḥijja 8 July 2022 27 June 2023 15 June 2024
Eid al-Adha 10 Dhū al-Ḥijja 9 July 2022 28 June 2023 16 June 2024
Eid al-Ghadeer 18 Dhū al-Ḥijja 17 July 2022 6 July 2023 24 June 2024
Eid al-Mubahalah 24 Dhū al-Ḥijja 23 July 2022 12 July 2023 30 June 2024

Notes to table

  1. ^abcd Observed by Shias primarily
  2. Observed 40 days after Ashura
  3. AbPrimarily observed byTwelver Shias
  4. BNot observed by Wahhabis, Deobandis, or Ahl-i-Hadith
  5. CNot observed by Wahhabis, Deobandis, or Ahl-i-Hadith See Isra and Mi’raj for examples of where there is controversy concerning this date
  6. Most often observed by Shias on the 23rd of Ramadan and by Sunnis on the 27th of Ramadan
  7. See Laylat al-Qadr
  8. South Asia has the majority of the observations
  9. It is observed on the final evening of Ramadan
  10. See Chaand Raat.

References

  • Oliver Leaman, “Festivals of Love,” in Muhammad in History, Thought, and Culture: An Encyclopedia of the Prophet of God (2 vols. ), edited by C. Fitzpatrick and A. Walker, Santa Barbara, ABC-CLIO, 2014, Vol I, pp. 197–199
  • Leaman, Oliver, “Festivals of Love,” in Muhammad in History, Thought, and Culture: An Encyclopedia of the Prophet of God (2 vols. ), edited by C. Fitz

External links

  • The Saudi Arabian Umm al-Qura Calendar (with a date converter that is valid from 1937 to 2077)
  • The Umm al-Qura Calendar (with a date converter that is valid from 1937 to 2077)

Major Islamic Holidays

The Islamic calendar year begins with the month of Muharram, which is the first month of the month of Ramadan. Muhammad’s journey from Mecca to Medina began on the first of Muharram, and his Islamic year is dated from the year of Hegira (anno Hegirae), the year in which he emigrated from Mecca to Medina (A.D. July 16, 622). The Islamic new year is commemorated in a low-key manner, with prayers and readings, as well as contemplation on the hegira (cycle of years).

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Mawlid al-Nabi (12 Rabi 1): Prophet Muhammad’s Birthday

The Islamic liturgical year begins with the month of Muharram, which is the first month of the Islamic calendar. On the first of Muharram, the Islamic calendar year begins.

It is numbered backwards from the Hegira (anno Hegirae) – the year in which Muhammad leftMecca for Medina – to now (A.D. July 16, 622). It is customary to observe the Islamic new year in a low-key manner, with prayers, readings, and contemplation on the hegira.

Eid al-Fitr (1 Shawwal): The Celebration concluding Ramadan

When Ramadan, the month of fasting, comes to a close, it is celebrated as Eid al-Fitr. Eid al-Fitr, which means “Festival of Breaking the Fast,” is one of the two most important Islamic feasts, the other being Ramadan (Eid al-Adha is the other). Eid al-Fitr is a time when people dress in their best attire, decorate their homes with lights and decorations, offer presents to youngsters, and spend time with their friends and family members. These celebrations are infused with a spirit of giving and thankfulness.

As the month draws to a conclusion, Muslims are reminded of their need to share their blessings by feeding the destitute and giving charitable contributions to mosques and charitable organizations.

Eid al-Adha (10 Dhu’l-Hijjah): The celebration concluding the Hajj

Known also as the Feast of Sacrifice, Eid al-Adha celebrates the willingness of the prophet Abraham to obey Allah by offering his son Ishmael as a sacrifice. According to the Qu’ran, shortly before Abraham slaughtered his son, Allah changed Ishmael with a ram, so preserving his life and allowing Abraham to continue with his mission. Eid al-Adha, one of the two most significant Islamic holidays, begins on the tenth day of Dhu’l-Hijja, the final month of the Islamic calendar, and ends on the tenth day of Ramadan.

Muslims all across the world are celebrating, not only those who are doing the hajj, which for the majority of Muslims is a once-in-a-lifetime event.

The sacrifice represents submission to Allah, and its distribution to others is a show of kindness, which is one of the five pillars of Islamic teaching.

?By Borgna Brunner

In the Year of the Hegira
A.H. 1434 A.H. 1435 A.H. 1436 A.H. 1437
Muharram(Islamic New Year)
Nov. 15, 2012 Nov. 5, 2013 Oct. 25, 2014 Oct. 15, 2015
Mawlid al-Nabi(Muhammad’s Birthday)
Jan. 24, 2013 Jan. 13, 2014 Jan. 3, 2015 Dec. 23, 2015
Ramadan begins
July 9, 2013 June 28, 2014 June 18, 2015 June 6, 2016
Eid al-Fitr(Ramadan ends)
Aug. 8, 2013 July 28, 2014 July 17, 2015 July 5, 2016
Eid al-Adha(Festival of Sacrifice)
Oct. 15, 2013 Oct. 4, 2014 Sept. 23, 2015 Sept. 11, 2016
NOTE:The Islamic calendar is based on lunar observation; thus, the above dates may vary by one or two days. Dates apply to North America.

.com/spot/islamicholidays.html

Islamic Archives

Islam has two official holidays: Eid Al-Fitr and Eid Al-Adha, which are both celebrated on the same day. The former is observed towards the conclusion of the month of Ramadan, whilst the latter is observed on the tenth day of the Islamic month of Dhu al-Hijjah (the final month of the Islamic calendar). It is also worth noting that Shia and Sunni Muslims do not observe the same holiday calendar, and that traditions differ from country to country—which is not unexpected given the fact that there are 1.6 billion Muslims in the globe.

Date Holiday Category Tags
Mar 1Tuesday
Isra and Mi’raj Religious Islamic
Apr 2Saturday
Ramadan Religious Festivities,Islamic
May 3Tuesday
Eid al-Fitr Religious Cultural,Festivities,Islamic
May 5Thursday
National Day of Prayer Religious Buddhist,Christian,Islamic
Jul 9Saturday
​Day of Arafah Religious Islamic
Jul 10Sunday
Eid al-Adha Religious Islamic
Jul 29Friday
Islamic New Year Religious Islamic
Aug 18Wednesday
Ashura Religious Islamic,Jewish
Oct 8Saturday
Milad an-Nabi (Mawlid) Religious Islamic
Dec 1Thursday
Commemoration Day Federal Appreciation,Historical,Islamic
Dec 16Friday
Bahrain National Day Federal Festivities,Historical,Islamic

The Biggest Muslim Holidays You Should Know About

Every holiday brings forth the best in children’s smiles | Phalinn Ooi / Flickr Muslim holidays cover a vast range of themes, emotions, and religious events, and they are observed in a variety of Muslim communities around the world. From the sorrow of religious leaders’ deaths to the celebration of kindness and humility, here is a list of some of the most important holidays that Muslims observe throughout the year. This month-long celebration of fasting, pilgrimage to mosques, charitable giving, and other good actions is probably the most well-known Muslim holiday.

For Muslims, it is a time of serious introspection, and because Ramadan is one of the five pillars of Islam, this month is particularly painful for many.

Muslim women will go to mosques to worship, recite the Quran, seek for forgiveness, and make charitable contributions on this night, which is considered one of the most significant of the year.

Photograph courtesy of AMISOM Public Information / Flickr The Eid Al-Fitr festival is a time of feasting and celebration that commemorates the conclusion of Ramadan and the end of fasting for Muslims throughout the world.

To mark the arrival of Eid Al-Fitr, a female police officer performs in Mogadishu’s main square.|AMISOM Public Information / Flickr This Muslim festival, also known as the “Feast of Sacrifice,” remembers the day on which the Prophet Ibrahim was prepared to sacrifice his son in line with his loyalty to God, as recorded in the Qur’an.

Many Muslims go above and above to assist charities and express gratitude for all of the benefits they have|Fort George Meade Public Affairs / Flickr|

The Prophet Moses and the Israelites were freed from Pharaoh on this day, according to Sunni tradition, and many people commemorate this event by fasting in gratitude.

This is a day of sadness for many Shia Muslims since it recalls the day Hussein Ibn Ali, along with the rest of his family, was slaughtered during the Battle of Karbala|Hassan Reza / Flickr This day, which comes on the 40th day following the day of Ashura, is a night of sorrow and mourning for the death of the Prophet Mohammad’s grandson Hussein Ibn Ali by the tyrant Yazidi on the 10th of Muharram in the year 680 AD.

It is a distinctively Shia memorial.

The city of Karbala in Iraq, where Hussein Ibn Ali was assassinated, hosts the world’s largest remembrance celebrations and marches, attracting more pilgrims than the Hajj pilgrimage in Mecca, Saudi Arabia, which takes place every year.

According to the Shia school of thinking, Eid Al-Ghadeer commemorates the anniversary of the day on which the Prophet Mohammad announced that Ali Ibn Abu Talib would be his successor.

On this day, many Shia Muslims remember the Prophet Muhammad’s death by attending lectures and reading about the lives of Ali Ibn Abu Talib and the Prophet Muhammad, while also attempting to reconcile with the differing opinions held by their Sunni brothers and sisters in the Islamic religion.

Some Muslims will celebrate by singing songs and dancing around the mosque, while others will study about the life of the Prophet Mohammad or attend lectures at the mosque to mark the occasion.

Some Muslims would even fast in order to express their gratitude to God for the Prophet. During prayer, a little youngster looks up to his father|Photo by Heather McCall / Flickr

Muslim Holidays: Fact Sheet

Islam, along with Judaism and Christianity, is considered to be one of the three primary Abrahamic faiths. Islam, which the Pew Research Center considers to be the world’s fastest growing religion, has roughly 1.8 billion adherents globally, with approximately 3.35 million of those adherents residing in the United States. 1 Muslims celebrate two important holidays each year: Eid al-Fitr and Eid al-Adha, which are both celebrated on the Islamic calendar. This information sheet highlights the significance of the two festivals, as well as the methods in which American Muslims observe them, and it also discusses the ways in which the holidays have been honored by political leaders.

These guidelines are intended to assist congressional offices with work relating to Islamic holy days and other religious holidays.

In the United States, religious holidays are commemorated in a series of information sheets published by the Congressional Research Service.

Dates of Holidays

Considering that Islamic calendar dates are based on the lunar calendar, they are usually ascertained by sightings of new moon with the naked eye. Some Muslims consider this activity to be a religious duty, whereas others do not. The traditional dependence on lunar observation results in dates being referred to as “approximate” until the new moon is actually observed. 2 A result of technical advancements and increased understanding of astronomy, some Muslims are beginning to support the use of astronomical predictions to predetermine dates, according to the Islamic tradition.

Major Holidays and Observances

For the past 1,400 years, Muslims have observed the Eid (Muslim festival) holiday as a religious holiday. The Muslim calendar is divided into two major celebrations: Eid al-Fitr and Eid al-Adha. Traditionally, the dates for these two festivals are established by the Islamic or Hijra calendar, which is based on the lunar year and is used in Islamic countries. 3 Year after year, the dates of Muslim holidays are revised to reflect the current calendar year. In accordance with the Hijra, or lunar calendar, the holidays on the Gregorian calendar are moved forward around 11 days each year on average.

Eid al-Fitr (Festival of the Breaking of the Fast)

Every year, at the completion of the approximately 30-day month of Ramadan, many Muslim adults fast from sunrise to sunset and donate to the poor and needy. This Eid is traditionally observed for one day each year at the conclusion of the month of Ramadan. Fasting throughout the month of Ramadan is one of Islam’s five pillars. During Ramadan, some people read the Qur’an from beginning to end. 4

Eid al-Adha (Festival of the Sacrifice)

Eid al-Adha is celebrated for 4 to 12 days at the completion of the Hajj (pilgrimage to Mecca and Medina, which is the fifth pillar of Islam) in many countries. Every year, almost 2 million Muslims go to Mecca to perform the Hajj from around the 10th to the 13th of Dhu al-Hijjah, the penultimate month of the Islamic calendar, according to the Islamic calendar. God appeared to Ibrahim (known as Abraham to Christians) in a dream and requested that he sacrifice his son Ishmael as a show of obedience.

It is thought that this son’s name is Isaac in the Judeo-Christian tradition.

According to religious legend, God intervened and demanded that a sheep be slaughtered in Ishmael’s place, and the request was granted. Despite the fact that both Eid festivals are significant, Muslims typically regard Eid al-Adha as the holiest feast on the Islamic calendar. 6

Nature of Eid Celebrations

From 4 to 12 days are observed across the world at the conclusion of the Hajj (pilgrimage, which is the fifth pillar of Islam) to Mecca and Medina, depending on the nation. Approximately 2 million Muslims take part in the Hajj every year, which takes place from approximately the 10th to the 13th of Dhu al-Hijjah, the penultimate month of the Islamic calendar, and lasts for three days. This holiday commemorates a dream in which God came to Ibrahim (also known as Abraham to Christians) and urged him to sacrifice his son Ishmael as an act of obedience to his command.

A sheep was slaughtered in Ishmael’s place, according to Jewish tradition, when God interceded and demanded it.

6

Other Muslim Celebrations

On the tenth day of the Islamic lunar month of Muharram, Shi’a Muslims commemorate the murder and subsequent martyrdom of Husayn, the Prophet Muhammad’s grandson, on the occasion of Ashura. This tradition is generally observed by donning black clothing, engaging in lamentation (and occasionally self-flagellation), and fasting. 9

Mawlid

Mawlid is a celebration of the Prophet Muhammad’s birth anniversary. Its legitimacy has been the subject of heated debate within the Muslim world, but it is recognized by the vast majority of Islamic denominations and is observed as a national holiday in the vast majority of Muslim-majority countries, with the exception of Saudi Arabia and Qatar, which do not observe it. Mawlid is observed during the Islamic calendar month of Rabi’ al-awwal, which is the third month of the year. 10 The Muslim community in the United States is split on whether Mawlid should be observed.

11

Official Recognition

The official government observance of Muslim holidays is established at the local level by the respective local government. Some school districts, for example, close their doors on the two Muslim Eid holidays. Eid al-Fitr and Eid al-Adha were declared official holidays in New York City in 2015, marking the city’s status as the first significant metropolis in America to do so. The city’s public schools were closed in observance of both Eids. The observances are currently being observed in municipalities around the United States.

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In 2001, the United States Postal Service published a postage stamp celebrating both Eids, marking the first time in American history that such a stamp was released.

13

Congressional Recognition

As time has passed, a number of Members of Congress have acknowledged the significance of the two Eid holidays, as well as the contributions made by Muslim Americans in the United States and their communities. Congressional Resolution 424, introduced by Representative Debbie Dingel on June 4, 2019, recognizes the Muslim holy month of Ramadan and commends a month of fasting and spiritual renewal, while extending best wishes to Muslims in the United States and around the world for a joyous and meaningful observance of Eid al-Fitr.

424.

165, no.

The following resolution was introduced by Representative Eddie Bernice Johnson on May 1, 2019: “Recognizing the opening of Ramadan, the Muslim holy month of fasting and spiritual rejuvenation, and commending Muslims in the United States and around the globe for their religion,” H.Res.

343. In “Celebration of Eid-al-Fitr Marking the End of the Holy Month of Ramadan,” Extensions of Remarks, Congressional Record, daily edition, vol. 162, no. 106 (July 1, 2016), pp. E1015 and E1016.

Presidential Recognition

Despite the fact that the two main Muslim holidays are not officially recognized as federal holidays, prior Presidents have acknowledged the significance of these holidays to Muslim Americans and Muslims throughout the world by making speeches or issuing statements in the media about them. Examples from the last two presidential administrations include the following: Presidential Message on the Observance of Eid al-Fitr (Donald J. Trump), June 2019PresidentialRemarks at the Iftar Dinner (Donald J.

Trump), May 5, 2019Presidential Message on the Observance of Ramadan (Donald J.

On June 5, 2016, President Barack Obama issued a Presidential Statement on the Observance of Ramadan.

Historical and Cultural Resources

There are a plethora of websites available that give information on the history and culture of Muslim holidays, as well as the Muslim-American experience as a whole. A few examples of them are as follows: “Video: Being a Muslim in the United States,” Pew Research Center. A peek at the beliefs and views of Muslims in America, based on data from the Pew Research Center’s 2017 study as well as personal anecdotes from Muslims from throughout the country. The Pew Research Center is a nonpartisan research organization.

  • “A Ramadan etiquette handbook for non-Muslims,” according to CNN.
  • “U.S.
  • Findings from a large-scale research of Muslim-Americans conducted in 2017.
  • “The Arab World,” says the narrator.
  • “Middle Eastern Studies” is an abbreviation.
  • “Islam is the religion.” Resources from the BBC that have been chosen for you.

Related CRS Reports

Jacob R. Straus’s CRS Report R41990, Federal Holidays: Evolution and Current Practices, is available online. Jacob R. Straus was the primary author of CRS Report R43539, Commemorations in Congress: Options for Honoring Individuals, Groups, and Events, which was overseen by Straus. Contact Information for the Author Technical Information Specialist Gary Sidor (Senior Technical Information Specialist) (,) Acknowledgments Hussein D.

Hassan, Senior Research Librarian at the Center for Research on Social Issues, conducted original research and prepared the initial draft of this fact sheet. In the following updates, Valerie Cervantes and Kristi Meltvedt were the authors or made significant contributions.

What Holidays Do Muslims Celebrate?

Every year, Muslims observe two main religious observances: Ramadan and the Hajj, as well as a number of holidays associated with each of them. All Islamic festivals are observed in accordance with the Islamic calendar, which is based on the lunar calendar.

Ramadan

Muslims fast for a month every year during the ninth month of the lunar calendar, which corresponds to the ninth month of the year. Ramadan is the name given to this observance. During this month, Muslims abstain from eating, drinking, smoking, and having sexual relations from sunrise to sunset. This fast is an incredibly essential component of the Muslim faith; in fact, it is one of the Five Pillars of Islam, which are the five pillars of the Islamic faith.

Laylat al-Qadr

When Ramadan comes to a conclusion, Muslims mark what is known as the “Night of Power” to commemorate the moment when Muhammad received revelation from Allah and received the first words of the Qur’an.

Eid al-Fitr

Ramadan concludes with the “Festival of Fast-Breaking,” which Muslims celebrate at the end of the month. Fasting is strictly banned on the day of Eid. The conclusion of Ramadan is traditionally marked by a ceremonial fast-breaking ceremony, as well as the recital of the Eid prayer in an open, outdoor place or mosque, according to tradition.

Hajj

Every year, during the 12th month of the Islamic calendar, millions of Muslims go to Mecca, Saudi Arabia, the birthplace of Muhammad, to participate in the annual pilgrimage. The Hajj is the name given to this trip.

Day of Arafat

Every year, during the 12th month of the Islamic calendar, millions of Muslims go to Mecca, Saudi Arabia, the birthplace of Muhammad, to participate in the annual pilgrimage to the city of prayer. He is referred to as the Hajj (Pilgrimage to Mecca).

Eid al-Adha

Muslims commemorate the “Festival of Sacrifice,” which takes place at the conclusion of their annual journey. Included in the ceremony is the traditional sacrifice of a sheep, camel, or goat, which is believed to remember the Prophet Abraham’s struggles and tribulations.

Other Muslim Holy Days

It is important to note that, other from these two major holidays and their associated ceremonies, there are no other widely celebrated Islamic festivals. Some Muslims commemorate additional events from Islamic history that are recognized holidays by some Muslims, but not by all Muslims. These events include:

Islamic New Year: 1 Muharram

Al-Hijra, the first day of Muharram, marks the commencement of the Islamic New Year and the beginning of the Islamic calendar year. The date was chosen to commemorate Muhammad’s hijra to Medina, which was a watershed point in Islamic doctrinal history and is celebrated on this day every year.

Ashura: 10 Muharram

The Ashura commemorates the death of Husein, Muhammad’s grandson, on the anniversary of his death. The occasion is honored with fasting, blood donation, and performances, which are mostly observed by Shi’ite Muslims, who dominate the celebration.

Mawlid an-Nabi: 12 Rabia’ Awal

The celebration of Mawlid al-Nabim, which takes place on the 12th of Rabiulawal, commemorates Muhammad’s birth in A.D.

570. Different Islamic sects observe the holy day in a variety of ways, which are listed below. Some Muslims prefer to mark Muhammad’s birth with gifts and feasts, while others consider this practice to be idolatry and denounce it as such.

Isra’Mi’raj: 27 Rajab

On the two holy nights of Isra’ and Mi’raj, some Muslims celebrate Muhammad’s trip from Mecca to Jerusalem, followed by his ascent to heaven and return to Mecca, as well as his death and resurrection. They commemorate this festival by offering prayers to the Almighty.

Holiday Dates for 2019 and 2020

Given that Islamic calendar dates are calculated according to the lunar calendar, it is possible that the equivalent Gregorian dates will differ by one or two days from those given below. Isra’Mi’raj:

  • From Wednesday, June 5, 2019, to Friday, July 5, 2019, and from Friday, April 24, 2020, to Sunday, May 24, 2020, respectively.

Eid al-Fitr is a Muslim holiday celebrated every year on the 15th of September.

  • Friday, August 9th to Wednesday, August 14th, 2019
  • Tuesday, July 28th to Sunday, August 2nd, 2020
  • Friday, August 9th to Wednesday, August 14th, 2019

Arafat’s birthday is celebrated on this day. Eid al-Adha (the Feast of the Sacrifice):

  • On August 10-11, 2019, and on July 30 to July 31, 2020, the dates are as follows: Saturday, August 10 to Sunday, August 11, 2019.

The Islamic New Year 1438 AH is celebrated on January 1st. Mawlid an-Nabi (Mawlid the Nabi):

  • Saturday, November 9, 2019
  • Wednesday, October 28, 2020
  • And Saturday, November 9, 2019.

Islamic Festivals and Holy Days

An introduction to some of the Islamic holidays is provided below:

  • Eid-ul-Adha, also known as the Festival of Sacrifice
  • Maulid Al-Nabi, also known as the Prophet Muhammad’s (pbuh) birthday
  • Ramadan

Eid-ul-Adha or Festival of Sacrifice

In Islam, this main festival commemorates the completion of the trip to Makkah, which Muslims are urged to do at least once in their lives. The Hajj is considered to be one of Islam’s five pillars. Animals are slaughtered by pilgrims on their trip back to Makkah from Mount Arafat in remembrance of Abraham’s (Ibrahim’s) willingness to sacrifice his son, Ishmael, on the occasion of the Eid. We are told that God intervened and presented Abraham with a sheep instead. Thousands of Muslims from over the world participate in the festivities, with the meat being donated to the underprivileged and enjoyed with family and friends.

When Muslims gather to commemorate the occasion, they are reminded of their own obedience to God.

Maulid Al-Nabi or Birthday of Prophet Muhammad (pbuh)

The Prophet Muhammad’s (pbuh) birthday is commemorated on Maulid Al-Nabi, however some Muslims do not see this celebration as a religious invention and consider it to be a religious innovation. Those Muslims who participate in the festivities do so with enthusiasm, with Shia Muslims celebrating five days after Sunni Muslims. Many Muslims consider it to be a significant celebration since Prophet Muhammad is seen as a tremendous benefit for all of mankind, and it was through him that the Holy Qur’an was revealed, according to tradition.

Ramadan

Ramadan is a month-long fasting period during which Muslims fast from sunrise till sunset on each day of the month. This necessitates complete abstention from all foods, beverages, smoking, and marital interactions. Fasting is one of Islam’s five pillars, but Ramadan is about much more than just fasting and abstention from food and drink. It is a period of greater devotion to Allah and remembrance of Him. It is customary for Muslim women to make a special effort to attend all five daily prayers at the Masjid (Mosque), and additional prayers are offered after the night prayer.

The goal of Ramadan is for Muslims to make positive changes in their lives and demeanor, and to maintain such changes throughout the rest of the year. Muslims celebrate Eid-ul-Fitr, which is the conclusion of Ramadan, at the end of the month.

  • Additional information on Ramadan
  • The implications of Ramadan for faculty and students
  • And other related topics.

Calendar of Festivals and Holy Days

On the following websites, you may find a list of festivals and holy days to observe:

Muslim holidays

Muslim Festivals and Observances Learn more about the religious festivals observed by Muslims. The Islamic Calendar is a calendar that is used in Islam. Islam uses a lunar calendar that is based on the rotation of the Moon. As a result, it is just 354 days in length. It features numerous notable holidays and differs from the Western calendar by approximately 11 days in length. The Islamic New Year is celebrated on January 1. The Islamic New Year is observed on the first day of Muharram, the first Islamic month, which is the first day of the Islamic calendar year.

  1. AshuraAshurais a period of fasting and contemplation of one’s own inner thoughts.
  2. Eid-Al-Adha Eid-Al-Adha is one of the most important religious feasts in Islam.
  3. Mawlid an-Nabi is a Muslim holiday celebrated on the first day of the month of Mawlid an-Nabi.
  4. It is observed to commemorate the Prophet Muhammad’s birth anniversary.
  5. In the Muslim religion, IsraMer’aj is a very auspicious night.
  6. It is observed on the 27th day of Rajab, the seventh month of the Islamic calendar, on the 27th of every month.
  7. In Islam, Eid al-Fitr is considered to be one of the most important holidays.
  8. Islam in GeneralLearn more about Islam as a religion in its entirety.

Holidays in Islam

Every day of the year is a holy day for Muslims, and they observe fasts and feasts. These celebrations represent the rich variety of the almost two billion strong Muslim population that exists across the world. A number of rituals, including as the yearly Hajj journey to Mecca, perpetuate old Arabian traditions that were codified in Islamic form by the Prophet Muhammad (570-632). Several others, such as the commemoration of the Prophet’s birthday (Mawlid al-Nab al-Sharf), were instituted hundreds of years after his death.

  • Others include local celebrations of miracle workers, military victories, or big political events, the latter of which is frequently imbued with religious overtones.
  • In commemoration of the revelation of the Quran to the Prophet Muhammad, Muslims fast for one month during the month of Ramadan, which culminates in the celebration of Eid al-Fitr.
  • During Ramadan, Muslims fast every day from sunrise to sunset, and the completion of the fast is marked by a big dinner to mark the occasion (iftar).
  • Several components of pre-Islamic Arabian religion are included into the pilgrimage, including the journey itself and adoration of the Kaaba, the sacred edifice located in the heart of the Grand Mosque in Mecca.
  • It was on his first and onlyhajj in 632 CE that the Prophet Muhammad established the ritual structure that pilgrims continue to follow to this day.
  • Muslims celebrate a number of fasting and pilgrimage days associated to the martyrdom of Prophet Muhammad’s grandson, Usayn ibn Al, the third ShiaImam, during the battle of Karbala, on the orders of the CaliphYazdI, which takes place during Muharram.
  • A number of notable local festivals have been commemorated by Palestinian Muslims throughout history.
  • While there have been allusions to the site’s reverence since the Mamluk period, it was the Ottoman rulers that renovated the tomb and encouraged the pilgrimage, which corresponds with the commencement of the Easter celebrations.
  • In Druze tradition, Shu’ayb is connected with the biblical Jethro, who is revered as the fourteenth prophet of the faith.
  • The National Library of Israel has a collection of objects that tell the wonderful stories of the Muslim festivals, which are housed in the library.

Other items can be found by browsing the Library’s online catalog or contacting librarians by email, text message, or the chat tool on our website, among other methods.

Muslim Holy Days and Observances

The date is April 2, 2022. During Ramadan, the ninth month of the Islamic calendar year, Muslims throughout the world refrain from eating and drinking during daylight hours. However, it is also a period when Christians are encouraged to practice self-sacrifice, purify their lives, and devote their whole attention to God. Sawm (Arabic for “fasting”) signifies “to abstain” from not just food but also from harmful deeds, thoughts, and words. It is a form of religious fasting. Islam encourages Muslims to forgive others, improve connections, and purify their lives and thoughts throughout the month of Ramadan.

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Fasting is a commitment made by Christians to purify both their physical bodies and their spiritual selves in order to glorify God.

The following are examples of greetings:

  • “Ramadan Mubarak!” (Happy Ramadan!) (“May Ramadan be blessed!”)
  • “Ramadan Kareem!” (“Kul ‘am wa enta bi-khair!”)
  • “Kul ‘am wa enta bi-khair!” (“May each and every year bring you excellent health! “)

Islamic Holidays

The Islamic calendar (also known as the Hijri calendar) is a lunar calendar that is strictly adhered to. It has 12 months that are based on the movements of the moon and are numbered 1 through 12. In addition, because 12 synodic months are only 12 x 29.53= 354.36 days, the Islamic calendar is constantly shorter than a solar year and moves by roughly 11 days every year in relation to the Gregorian calendar, as seen in the table below. It is believed that there are 3-6 million Muslims in the United States.

  1. Understanding and observing these holy days not only raises understanding of the variety among students, but it also instills pride in Muslim students who observe these days on a regular basis.
  2. We hope you find this information to be helpful.
  3. Ramadan is upon us (Islamic month of Fasting) Ramadan is the ninth month of the Islamic calendar, and it is during this month that Muslims fast from sunrise to sunset every day in an effort to purify themselves and improve their moral character.
  4. Eid ul-Fitr will be celebrated on May 2, 2022.
  5. Hajj will take place between July 6 and July 8, 2022.
  6. The Hajj ceremonies also serve to memorialize the tribulations endured by the Prophet Abraham and his family.
  7. Every year, between two and three million Muslims go to Mecca for the pilgrimage.

During this time of year, people remember Abraham’s willingness to sacrifice his son, whom God miraculously replaced with a lamb.

The date is July 29, 2022 (1444 A.H.*).

The beginning of the Islamic calendar year is marked with the celebration of Islamic New Year.

This event is significant in Islamic history because it symbolizes the end of the time of persecution in Mecca and the beginning of the shift from a marginalized religious community in Medina to a recognized faith community.

Ashura is observed on the tenth of Muharram, the first month of the Islamic calendar, on the 10th of Muharram.

On this day, Shi’as remember Husain, who died tragically at the hands of the Umayyad ruler, Yazid, on the anniversary of the Prophet’s grandson’s death.

Dates for the next Islamic holidays Calendar for the year 2023 Ramadan will take place between March 23 and April 20, 2023.

Hajj will take place between June 25 and June 27, 2023.

The Islamic New Year will be celebrated on July 18, 2023.

*Following the Hijrah (Hijrah is an Arabic word that signifies “migration”).

Please keep in mind that, in some parts of the nation and due to differences in academic opinion, the exact dates of the new moon are dependent on local observations of the new moon. The Islamic Speakers Bureau of Arizona may be reached at 480-946-0626 if you require further information.

Islamic Holidays (Meat Goat Home Study Course)

A ceremony commemorating the Prophet Ibrahim (renamed Abraham), who was prepared to sacrifice his son Ismail in order to serve Allah, is known as Eid ul Adha. It is necessary that the animals sacrificed for this festivity be Halal. Extended family members are frequently given portions of the slaughtered animal, and some may even be given away to the less fortunate. Many Muslims would search for an animal that is devoid of blemishes and other imperfections. That is to say, the animal should not have had its ears docked or its castrated, and if the animal has horns, the horns should not have been damaged.

According to certain Muslims, animals can be considered permissible if they have been castrated with a burdizzo or if the castration wound has healed entirely.

It is preferable to use yearling lambs and goats, although older sheep and goats are okay as well.

Muharram – Islamic New Year

A ceremony commemorating the Prophet Ibrahim (renamed Abraham), who was prepared to sacrifice his son Ismail in order to serve Allah, is celebrated on Eid ul Adha. It is necessary that the animals sacrificed for this occasion be Halal. Extended family members frequently share the sacrificial animal, and some may even be given away to the less fortunate. An animal that is devoid of blemishes will be sought after by many Muslims. That is to say, the animal should not have had its tail docked or its castrated, and if the animal has horns, the horns should not have been broken.

According to certain Muslims, animals that have been castrated with a burdizzo or whose castration wound has entirely healed are considered permissible.

It is preferable to use yearling lambs and goats, although older sheep and goats are also good for this purpose.

Mawlid al Nabi

A ceremony commemorating the Prophet Ibrahim (renamed Abraham), who was prepared to sacrifice his son Ismail for the sake of Allah, is known as Eid ul Adha. The animals sacrificed on this occasion must be Halal. Extended family members are frequently given portions of the sacrificed animal, and some may even be given away to those in need. Many Muslims would seek for an animal that is devoid of blemishes. In other words, the animal should not have been docked or castrated, and if the animal has horns, the horns should not have been broken.

According to certain Muslims, animals that have been castrated with a burdizzo or whose castration wound has entirely healed are permitted to eat.

Because the meat would be shared, heavier lambs and goats are ideal for this occasion. It is ideal to use yearling lambs and goats, although older sheep and goats are also good. Lambs and goats should be heavier than 60 pounds in weight.

Ramadan

Eid ul Adha is a Muslim holiday that celebrates the Prophet Ibrahim (also known as Abraham), who was prepared to sacrifice his son Ismail in order to serve Allah. Animals that are sacrificed on this occasion must be Halal. The sacrificial animal is sometimes divided with other family members, and some may even be given away to the less fortunate. Many Muslims would opt for an animal that is devoid of blemishes. In other words, the animal should not have had its ears docked or its castrated, and if the animal has horns, the horns should not have been broken.

Some Muslims consider animals permissible if they have been castrated with a burdizzo or if the castration wound has entirely healed.

Yearling lambs and goats are preferable, although older sheep and goats are also suitable.

Eid al Fitr – The Breaking of the Ramadan Fast

It is believed that the fasting period would come to an end when the next new moon is observed. Muslims will be celebrating Eid al Fitr for the next three days. The holiday is a time for families to come together and express gratitude for the numerous benefits and joys they have received. According to the Islamic calendar, lambs should weigh 60 to 80 pounds and goats should weigh 60 pounds throughout the month of Ramadan.

Eid al-Adha 2021: When is the Muslim festival and how will it be celebrated amid COVID-19?

In a few days, millions of Muslims around the world will mark the occasion of Eid al-Adha, an Islamic holy holiday remembering Prophet Abraham’s fidelity to God after being tested by God’s unmet mandate to sacrifice his son, which will take place this week. In addition, the festival celebrates the conclusion of the annual Hajj journey. Unlike another significant Muslim holiday, Eid al-Fitr, which was recently celebrated in May to commemorate the conclusion of the holy month of Ramadan, Eid al-Fitr is a religious celebration.

The majority of Muslims in the United States will be commemorating Eid al-Adha on the evening of July 19, according to the Islamic calendar.

The majority of people in the United States observe only one day of the year.

Because of the coronavirus epidemic, this year’s holiday celebrations will be a little different than usual.

What is Eid al-Adha?

In a few days, millions of Muslims around the world will mark the occasion of Eid al-Adha, an Islamic holy holiday remembering Prophet Abraham’s fidelity to God after being tested by God’s unmet mandate to sacrifice his son, which will be celebrated this week. Furthermore, the occasion heralds the conclusion of the annual Hajj trip in Saudi Arabia. Unlike another significant Muslim holiday, Eid al-Fitr, which was recently celebrated in May to commemorate the completion of the holy month of Ramadan, Eid al-Fitr is not a religious festival.

During the evening of July 19, the majority of Muslims in the United States will observe Eid al-Adha.

On one day, most individuals in the United States participate in a religious observance.

When Muslims would normally congregate, they would visit mosques and attend major communal events, as would be expected. The coronavirus epidemic has changed the way people are celebrating this year, and it is a good thing. To prepare for the holiday, here’s what you need know:

The meaning of ‘al-Adha’

Specifically, the “one in which Abraham was urged – as a test – by God to kill his son, only for God intervene and substitute a ram (or lamb) instead,” according to Omid Safi, professor of Islamic studies at Duke University. “Al-Adha” is a celebration of sacrifice. The sacrifice presented in the Quran (the Islamic sacred scripture) is similar to that recounted in the Bible, however most Muslims believe that Abraham is ordered by God to sacrifice his son Ishmael rather than Isaac. Muslims’ response to Vice President Biden: Fighting Islamophobia necessitates more than just removing President Donald Trump’s visa restriction.

It is still customary to sacrifice animals to commemorate the anniversary in modern times, often goats, lambs, or cows.

According to Anna Bigelow, assistant professor of religious studies at Stanford University, the meat from the slaughtered animals is distributed to the community and food banks in regions where Muslims are underprivileged or food insecure.

“Since the notion of sacrifice originally referred to sacrificing that which is precious (thus the test of offering one’s child to God), there has been a longstanding Muslim tradition of taking the sacrifice at the symbolic level, implying that the real sacrifice is not the killing of an animal, but rather the sacrificing of one’s own egoistical desires,” he explained further.

How will Eid al-Adha be celebrated this year?

Spending time with friends and family, dressing up in new clothes, and presenting gifts are all traditional aspects of celebrations. According to Khalil, a large community religious celebration or service is frequently held, which includes a prayer and a sermon, among other things. There are certain exceptions to the rule in the age of COVID-19. “Every town is unique in its own way. Some groups may choose to cancel the prayer, while others may choose to hold it outside with social separation, while yet others may choose to hold it indoors, and so on “Khalil shared his thoughts.

There are various delicacies that are prepared to commemorate the festival in certain nations or locations.

The specifics of this will vary greatly from country to country as well as from area to region “Khalil shared his thoughts.

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