What Does Islam Say About Women? (Solution found)

Islam views men and women as equal before God, and the Quran underlines that man and woman were “created of a single soul” (4:1, 39:6 and elsewhere).

What is the role of a woman in Islam?

Women are often expected to be obedient wives and mothers, staying within the family environment, while men are expected to be protectors and caretakers of the family. However, the majority of Muslim scholars agree that women are not obligated to serve their husbands, do housework, or do any kind of work at home.

What is haram for a woman in Islam?

Exposing the intimate parts of the body is unlawful in Islam as the Quran instructs the covering of male and female genitals, and for adult females the breasts.

What does the Quran say about women’s modesty?

Quran. The Qur’an instructs both Muslim men and women to dress in a modest way, yet there is disagreement on how these instructions should be followed. The clearest verse on the requirement of modest dress is Surah 24:31, telling women to guard their genitalia and draw their khimār over their bosoms.

Can a woman touch another woman in Islam?

A number of Muslim intellectuals and Muslim scholars have challenged this view and claim that certain physical contact is permissible as long as there is no obscenity, inappropriate touching (other than a simple handshake), secret meetings or flirting, according to the general rules of interaction between the genders.

What is humility in Islam?

Humility comes from knowing about God and recognising His greatness, venerating Him, loving Him and being in awe of Him; and it comes from knowing about oneself and one’s own faults, and weaknesses. The companions of the Prophet and the early generations of Muslims understood the concept of humility.

Is hijab mandatory in Islam?

Muslim women are required to observe the hijab in front of any man they could theoretically marry. This means that hijab is not obligatory in front of the father, brothers, grandfathers, uncles or young children.

What is haram for a man in Islam?

It is also believed that riba makes a man selfish and greedy. All business and trade practices that do not result in a free and fair exchange of goods and services are considered haram, such as bribery, stealing, and gambling. Therefore, all forms of deceit and dishonesty in business are prohibited in Islam.

Why can’t Muslims touch dogs?

Traditionally, dogs are considered haram, or forbidden, in Islam as they are thought of as dirty. But while conservatives advocate complete avoidance, moderates simply say Muslims should not touch the animal’s mucous membranes — such as the nose or mouth — which are considered especially impure.

Are Muslims allowed to date?

They have religious restrictions that limit physical contact in premarital relationships. Dating is still linked to its Western origins, which implies underlying expectations of sexual interactions — if not an outright premarital sexual relationship — which Islamic texts prohibit. But Islam does not forbid love.

What is halal hug?

Hugging your Mahrams is permitted. For a male to hug another male no matter who that is, is also permissible, or for a female to hug a non-mahram female. Hugging a non-mahram of the opposite gender is not permissible.

Handout 3: Position – Muslim Women Are Not Equal

In Islamic society, Muslim women are neither regarded equal to males, nor are they valued on an equal basis with men.

  • Women are to be submissive to males, according to the teachings of the Holy Qur’an. As stated in Qur’an 4.34, “Men are superior to women because God has chosen some men above all others, as well as in that they spend their riches
  • And the virtuous women, dedicated, watchful (in their husbands’) absence, as God has cared for them.” When it comes to individuals whose perversity you are concerned about, rebuke them and confine them to bedchambers, beating them
  • But if they submit to you, do not seek a method against them
  • For God is exalted and great.”
  • The Prophet Muhammad’s behavior demonstrates his regard for and respect for Khadijah in a clear and unambiguous manner. Khadijah is likewise held in high regard among Muslims. However, regard for Khadijah does not necessarily imply respect for all women
  • One of Allah’s qualities is that he has no body and no gender, which means that he has no respect for any woman. Allah, on the other hand, is always referred to as “He.” Generally speaking, in Arabic, genderless nouns are assigned the male pronoun form. In this case, it is apparent that males are considered superior to females in Islamic culture in general
  • The rule that women cover their hair and dress modestly is humiliating and discriminatory. The limitation is used to excuse abuse of women who have uncovered hair, exposed arms, or other signs of immodesty by claiming that they “asked for it” by dressing inappropriately. The Qur’an does not contain specifics on Sharia law (Islamic religious law), but traditional Muslim texts and practice are used to justify restrictions on women’s access to education, transportation, and employment. These restrictions place women at the mercy of men for these fundamental rights, denying them the right to self-determination. Where this is the case, women and girls are subjected to oppression, regardless of what the Qur’an teaches. If lowering the eyes and softening the voice are recognitions of personal authority and expressions of humility before God, why are males not obligated to do so in the same way? The fact that males are not obligated to do so reflects the assumption that women will be subservient. It is an indication of continuous oppression when people are unwilling to challenge the differences in criteria for men and women. Is it possible for anything to be done repeatedly and with the power of habit to become correct
  • Given the fact that Muhammad was ahead of his time, valued women enough to proclaim their equality with men, and improved women’s place in society for the better, would he not want today’s women to be treated on an equal footing with men today? Would Muhammad want things done differently if he could see that the way Sharia (Islamic law) is being administered today prevents women from achieving opportunity, freedom, and happiness?

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Muslim Views on Women in Society

Almost everywhere that Muslims have been polled, the vast majority believe that a wife should always follow her husband. At the same time, there is widespread agreement – at least outside of sub-Saharan Africa – that a woman should have the freedom to choose whether or not to cover her face in public. When it comes to divorce and inheritance, Muslims are less united than they are on other issues. A wide range of Muslim nations have different percentages of Muslims who feel a wife should have the right to divorce her husband, and the percentage who believe that sons and daughters should inherit equally varies greatly among countries questioned.

On these issues, there are also noticeable differences between Muslims who want sharia to be the official law of the land in their country and Muslims who do not want this to be the case.

Women and Veiling

Women’s choice to choose whether or not to wear a veil in public is broadly supported by Muslims in many of the nations examined. 30 This point of view is particularly widespread in Southern and Eastern Europe, Central Asia, and Southeast Asia, with at least nine out of ten Muslims in Bosnia-Herzegovina (92 percent), Kosovo (91 percent), and Turkey holding this perspective (90 percent ). Muslims in the Middle East, North Africa, and South Asia are less united than Muslims elsewhere in the world.

Sub-Saharan Africa is the only region in which the majority of Muslims believe that women should have the right to choose whether or not to cover their faces.

In Nigeria (30 percent) and the Democratic Republic of the Congo, women’s right to choose is supported by less than a third of people (29 percent ).

Wives’ Role

The majority of Muslims in the nations questioned believe that a wife’s duty is to always follow her husband. Muslim women are expected to obey their husbands in at least twenty-three of the twenty-three nations where the issue was put out. Muslims in South Asia and Southeast Asia are predominantly of the opinion that this is correct. In every country studied in these regions, almost nine out of ten or more respondents believe that wives must follow their husbands. In a similar vein, in every country studied in the Middle East and North Africa, around three-quarters or more agree with this statement.

In Tajikistan, over nine out of 10 people (89 percent) are in favor, whereas just approximately half of those in Kazakhstan are (51 percent ).

Among Muslims in most of the Southern and Eastern European nations that were polled, fewer than half agree that a wife must always follow her husband. I Russian Muslims are the only exception, with 69 percent of Muslims agreeing with this position.

Women and Divorce

Muslims in the nations polled are divided on the issue of whether women should have the freedom to end a marriage on their own terms. 31 Muslim women should have this privilege, according to at least half of those who answered the question in 13 of the 22 nations where it was posed. In Central Asia as well as in Southern and Eastern Europe, the majority of Muslims accept this viewpoint, with 94 percent in Bosnia and Herzegovina, 88 percent in Kosovo, 85 percent in Turkey, and 84 percent in Albania holding this viewpoint.

Muslims in South Asia and the Middle East-North Africa area are less united in their beliefs than Muslims in other parts of the world.

(14 percent ).

Inheritance Rights for Women

At least half of Muslims in 12 of the 23 nations where the issue was posed believe that sons and daughters should have equal inheritance rights. 32This is the viewpoint held by the majority of Muslims throughout Central Asia, as well as in Southern and Eastern Europe, including 88 percent in Turkey and 79 percent in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Among the countries in these areas, Kyrgyzstan is the only one where less than half of the population (46 percent) supports equal inheritance rights. In South and Southeast Asia, public opinion varies greatly from one country to the next.

Fewer than half of Muslims in the Middle East and North Africa believe sons and daughters should inherit the same amount of property as they do.

National Context and Gender Attitudes

It is possible that Muslims’ attitudes regarding gender problems are impacted by the social and political environment in which they reside. For example, levels of support for equal inheritance between sons and daughters are frequently higher in nations where inheritance rules do not stipulate that boys should receive a larger portion of the bequest. According to surveys, a majority of Muslims support equal inheritance for sons and daughters in most nations where the law does not demand unequal inheritance for sons and daughters.

As in Bosnia and Herzegovina, where this is also true, more than three-quarters of Muslims in postcommunist Bosnia and Herzegovina (79 percent) and Kosovo (76 percent) hold this viewpoint.

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Women’s Views on Women’s Rights

The social and political environment in which Muslims reside may have an impact on their attitudes about gender problems. When it comes to equal inheritance between sons and daughters, for example, levels of support are frequently higher in nations whose inheritance rules do not stipulate that sons should receive a larger portion. According to surveys, a majority of Muslims support equal inheritance for sons and daughters in most nations where the law does not demand unequal inheritance between sons and daughters.

More over three-quarters of Muslims in postcommunist Bosnia and Herzegovina (79 percent) and Kosovo (76 percent) share this viewpoint, as well.

This includes a quarter or fewer Muslims in Jordan (25 percent), Iraq (22 percent), Morocco, and Tunisia (15 percent each).

Sharia and Women’s Rights

It is possible that Muslims’ attitudes toward gender issues are influenced by the social and political context in which they live. For example, levels of support for equal inheritance between sons and daughters are often higher in countries where inheritance laws do not specify that sons should receive a larger share of the inheritance. Indeed, in most countries where laws do not mandate unequal inheritance between sons and daughters, a majority of Muslims support equal inheritance. For example, nearly nine out of ten Muslims in Turkey (88 percent) believe that all children should inherit the same amount of money.

In contrast, in most countries where inheritance laws specify that sons should receive greater shares than daughters, a smaller percentage of Muslims favor equal inheritance, including a quarter or fewer in Jordan (25 percent), Iraq (22 percent), Morocco, and Tunisia (15 percent each).

The True Importance of Women in Islam

Khadija was the first person to convert to Islam, and she was a woman (ra). Aisha, the greatest Muslim scholar of all time, was a woman (ra). Fatima was the one who adored the Prophet (saw) the greatest, and she was a lady (ra). Despite popular belief, women have the status of loving equals in Islam, contrary to popular belief. With his sermons on the value of women delivered in the midst of a historically sexist environment, the Prophet (saw) extolled the virtues of female contribution to family and society, denounced sexist treatment of women, and advocated for their rights.

According to Shaykh Ibn Baaz, far from the caricature of the mute and veiled Muslim lady, “There is no question that Islam came to honour women, defend them, safeguard them from the wolves of humanity, guarantee their rights, and elevate their standing.” Considering all of the muddle that exists between historical events, culture, and religion, it is critical that we ask ourselves: what do the Qur’an and the Ahadithactuallyteach us about the role of women in Islamic society?

  • What Islam has to teach us about the equality of women and men In accordance with the teachings of the Qur’an, Adam and Eve were formed from the same soul, and hence are both equal in blame, responsibility, and worth.
  • The notion of equality is present in other aspects of Islamic beliefs as well.
  • They urge people to do good and forbid them to do bad, they pray and pay charitable donations, and they follow God and his Prophet.” (9:71) in the Qur’an.
  • Women were not regarded on an equal footing with males throughout history, from Europe to the Arab East.
  • Furthermore, forced marriages were rampant, girls’ education was scarce, and female newborns were frequently abandoned or buried alive in the ground.
  • According to Islamic law, all human life is regarded holy, and both men and women have the freedom to choose whom they marry and should never be coerced to do so by their families or society.
  • The fact that several Islamic nations, like Turkey and Pakistan, have had female heads of state is noteworthy.
  • It has been said that anytime Fatima (ra) entered a room, the Prophet (saw) would rise from his seat and offer it to her (as is customary).
  • As Muslims, we seek to adhere to the Prophet’s Sunnah and to carry on the wonderful deeds that he began (saw).
  • OurWomen’s Welfare Appeal is a non-profit organization that provides assistance to women via a range of customized programs.
  • We also provide sustainable vocational training in areas like sewing, textile business development and climate-resistant farming.

Help even more women prosper and follow in the footsteps of Khadija (ra), Aisha (ra), and Fatima (ra) by making a donation to our charity for women in need, and you will be helping to champion women and girls.

Global Connections . Roles of Women

More rights than one might thinkSome Americans believe that Muslim women are oppressed by their religion, forced to cover themselves completely, denied education and other basic rights. It is true that Muslim women, like women all over the world, have struggled against inequality and restrictive practices in education, work force participation, and family roles. Many of these oppressive practices, however, do not come from Islam itself, but are part of local cultural traditions. (To think about the difference between religion and culture, ask yourself if the high rate of domestic violence in the United States is related to Christianity, the predominant religion.)In fact, Islam gives women a number of rights, some of which were not enjoyed by Western women until the 19th century. For example, until 1882, the property of women in England was given to their husbands when they married, but Muslim women always retained their own assets. Muslim women could specify conditions in their marriage contracts, such as the right to divorce should their husband take another wife. Also, Muslim women in many countries keep their own last name after marriage.
TheQuranexplicitly states that men and women are equal in the eyes of God. Furthermore, the Quran:
  • Female infanticide is prohibited (though it was practiced in pre-Islamic Arabia and other parts of the world)
  • Muslims are instructed to educate their daughters as well as their sons
  • Women are given the right to refuse a prospective husband
  • Women are given the right to divorce in certain circumstances
  • Women are given the right to own and inherit property (though in Sunni Islam, they receive only half of what men inherit). Women are also given the right to own and inherit property in certain circumstances. Men are supposed to provide for their mothers and any unmarried female relatives, and it is argued that they would require more money to do so.)
  • Regardless of whether polygyny is permitted, it is strongly discouraged, and it is on the whole practiced less frequently than Westerners believe. It is more common in the Gulf region, which includes Saudi Arabia. The Quranic statement is frequently used by Muslims “However, they should be treated equally. and if you are unable to, then one is preferred “and argue that monogamy is desirable, if not required
  • And
The Quran and the role of womenAs the Islamic state and religion expanded, interpretations of the gender roles laid out in the Quran varied with different cultures. For example, some religious scholars in ninth- and 10th-century Iraq were prescribing more restrictive roles for women, while elite women in Islamic Spain were sometimes able to bend these rules and mix quite freely with men (see Walladah bint Mustakfi below).Some contemporary women – and men as well – reject the limitations put on women and are reinterpreting the Quran from this perspective.Local cultural traditions
Before the arrival of Islam in the seventh century, upper-class women in Byzantine society andSassanianwomen of the royal harem wore the veil as a mark of their high status. This custom was adopted by elite women in early Islamic society in the same region. Many nomadic women, however, maintained their traditional freedom of movement and less restrictive dress codes even after conversion to Islam.Quranic rights for women were not always followed, depending on the strength of local patriarchal customs. Women in 19th-century Ottoman Egypt, for example, were often not given the full inheritance due them by law. If they challenged the family members who withheld their money in an Islamic court, however, they could win. This is still the case in family law practices in some countries.Female political leaders in Muslim societiesSome women in Muslim societies have been prominent political actors. Female relatives of the ProphetMuhammadwere particularly important in the early Muslim community because they knew his practice and teachings so well. Other women came to power through fathers or husbands. Still others wielded power behind the scenes.
  • During the Battle of Camel, Aisha, Muhammad’s favorite wife, had considerable political power and even participated in the battle. Razia was a Muslim lady monarch who reigned over India in the 13th century. During the 16th century, Amina reigned as queen of Zaria, which is now part of Nigeria. Shajarat al-Durr was a Mamluk sultan for a small period of time, but he was the real power behind the throne for an even longer period of time. It was during the Ottoman Empire’s so-called “sultanate of women” period in the 17th century when a number of powerful women wielded immense authority over the affairs of state. While becoming renowned for removing her face veil, Huda Shaarawi went on to found a women’s political party and campaigned for Egyptian independence from Britain throughout the first half of the twentieth century.
Today there is a small but growing number of women in the parliaments of Turkey, Egypt, Jordan, and Lebanon, and in the fall of 2002, the Moroccan parliament is hoping to bring women into 25 percent of its seats. Contemporary Muslim women heads of state have included Megawati Sukarnoputri of Indonesia, Benazir Bhutto of Pakistan, Tansu Ciller of Turkey, and Khaleda Zia and Sheik Hasina Wazed of Bangladesh.Women as religious leadersSufism is an important branch of Islam emphasizing mysticism and one’s personal relationship with God. The tenets of Sufism were first articulated by a woman named Rabia, a freed slave who became a prominent scholar in the eighth-century city of Basra in Iraq. She refused to marry because she did not want any earthly distractions from her love of God. Fatima, the Prophet Muhammad’s daughter, and Zaynab, the Prophet’s granddaughter, are also very important role models of piety for women in the Islamic world.Contemporary women are also important religious leaders. Zaynab al-Ghazali led the women’s wing of the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt. There are numerous women teachers, preachers, and Islamist leaders in contemporary Iran, one example being Zahra Rahnavard. In the United States, Riffat Hassan is a well-known American Muslim scholar.The role of wealth and class
Wealthier women historically have had more economic and educational opportunities by virtue of their class. Many wealthy women were and continue to be highly educated, their money and intelligence giving them the power to ignore society’s traditional expectations of women and to participate fully in the economic, political, and cultural life of their community.Wealthy women, however, have often been more restricted in their clothing and movement in public, since keeping them covered and out of public life is a way to demonstrate status. Poorer and rural women have had relatively more freedom of movement but fewer educational opportunities. In addition, women in highly segregated Muslim societies sometimes created (and still do create) their own society set apart from the male world. Segregation does not necessarily mean isolation for women, though it obviously has many other effects.Individual personality and abilities
Whatever the cultural and economic background of a woman, her own abilities and personality greatly determine what she can achieve in her society.
  • Khadija, the Prophet’s first wife, was a self-assured and astute businesswoman who was respected across the Muslim world. Initially, she engaged the Prophet to guide her commercial caravans, and then she offered marriage to him, despite the fact that she was several years her junior. Walladah bint Mustakfi, a lively noblewoman and prominent poet of 11th-century Cordoba, was the first person in the world to convert to Islam. She hosted parties with both men and women, where she read poetry. She stated, “I am by God fit for great things/And go my path equipped with pride.”
  • The contemporaneous singer Umm Kulthum, who came from a poor country upbringing, was widely regarded as the voice and conscience of Egypt, and she sang in Arabic. In spite of the passage of time, her legacy and song continue to enjoy widespread appeal throughout the Arab world.
The “veil”
The veil is often seen in the West as a symbol of Muslim women’s subordinate position in society, but its meaning and use vary enormously in Muslim societies.
  • Despite the fact that the Quran commands both men and women to dress modestly, the actual interpretation and application of this guideline differs greatly. Historically, the veil has been associated with social status rather than religious affiliation. The veil was initially used in pre-Islamic Byzantine and Persian traditions, and afterwards in Islamic conventions. Women from low and rural backgrounds have, on average, less protection than women from metropolitan and privileged backgrounds. Head coverings (hijab) differ from one culture to the next within Islam. From casual scarves to veils and full-length coverings, such as theburqa, which is worn by many Afghan women, they are available. There is also a new style known as “Islamic clothing,” which consists of a loose coat worn with a scarf knotted over the hair and is becoming increasingly popular. Face covering was more common in the past than it is today, and it was more common in some locations than it is in others. Women of numerous cultures and religions cover their heads in a variety of ways, and head covering is not only an Islamic practice. The rules for veiling differ from one nation to the next. Today, stringent restrictions governing women’s attire are frequently employed to stress a government’s religiosity, as in Iran or Saudi Arabia, and to promote the religious orientation of the government. Turkey, on the other hand, does not let women to cover their faces in public places such as government offices or colleges since the Turkish government is devoted to a more secular character. Tunisia is another country where wearing a veil is discouraged. In every situation, a large number of citizens are unsatisfied with the law.
In many cases the varied practice of veiling is a personal, but not necessarily a permanent, choice made by women.Back to topMuslims: Women and Islam:shows/muslims/themes/women.htmlIs Islam inherently discriminatory? What is Muslim women’s role in the Islamic resurgence? And what does it mean to be a Muslim “feminist”? Muslim Women’s League Web Site:The Muslim Women’s League is a nonprofit American Muslim organization working to implement the values of Islam and thereby reclaim the status of women as free and equal. Women in Afghanistan:-dec01/afghanwomen_11-21.htmlFour Afghan women talk toNewsHourabout their repression during Taliban rule. (November 2001) Introduction to Islam:This introductory book on Islam includes a chapter on women. Biographical Sketches: Biographical sketches of influential Muslim women Women, Class, and Islam during the Ottoman Empire:/module2/tutorial2a.htmA tutorial on women, class, and Islam during the Ottoman Empire Rabi’ah:Biographies on Rabia, one of the first Sufis, including translated quotations from her speeches The Muslim Sisters’ Homepage:This Web site is meant to help people to understand the true stance Islam takes on gender issues and the role of women.Women in Iran:Vis à Visdiscusses women’s rights in Iran, pre-Islamic Revolution through today. Gender Issues in Islam:Students will compare and contrast the roles of men and women with regard to various topics in the six countries featured in the film. A Woman’s Place:Students will learn about women’s status in Iran and the U.S. across different points in history, explain why women in Iran dress and interact with men in specific ways, and relate this to certain groups/religions in the U.S., and adopt the perspective of a woman living at a different time in the U.S. or Iran. Divas: The Interviews:Interviews with Iranian women about poetry, religion, politics, marriage, film, youth, and freedom of the press Reaching Across the Divide:Attacks prompt a Muslim woman to teach others about her faith, dispel myths, and build understanding.Center for Near Eastern Studies: Media: Veiling and the Media:This site provides a variety of viewpoints and resources in the Western popular media that look at veiling of Muslim women.Related topics
The Quran and the role of womenLocal cultural traditionsFemale political leaders in Muslim societiesWomen as religious leadersThe role of wealth and classIndividual personality and abilitiesThe “veil”
Timeline(requiresFlash)Key events related to roles of women in the Middle EastText-Only TimelineLesson plans:Who Wears a Veil?Muslim Women Through TimeHow Many Wives?Related sitesRelated topics
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Women in the Quran and the Sunnah

Professor and Director of the Center for Islamic Legal Studies at Ahmadu Bello University in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The Islamic religion makes no distinction between men and women in terms of their connection with Allah, as both are promised the same reward for good behaviour and the same penalty for evil conduct, and as such, there is no distinction between them. According to the Qur’an, women have privileges over males that are equivalent to those enjoyed by men over women. (2:226) When speaking to believers, the Qur’an frequently use the phrase ‘believingmen andwomen’ to underline the equality of men and women in relation to their respective obligations, rights, virtues, and merits, among other things.

  1. (33:35) This is in direct conflict with the Christian Fathers’ belief that women do not possess souls and would live as sexless entities in the future world, which is patently false.
  2. (16:97) The Qur’an warns males who oppress or mistreat women, saying: “O you who believe!
  3. You should not treat them harshly in order to be able to take away a portion of the dowry you have given them, unless they have been guilty of blatant lewdness.
  4. Even though you have a strong hatred for them, it is possible that Allah will use that aversion to bring about a tremendous degree of positive change in your life.
  5. The Islamic faith views men and women as being of the same essence because they were both born from a single soul, in contrast to other religions that describe women as possessing inherent sin and evil while males are considered to possess inherent virtue and nobility.
  6. It is important to honor Allah, through Whom you are claiming your mutual (rights), as well as your mothers’ wombs, for Allah is always watching over you.

In a most lovely comparison, the Qur’an underscores the intrinsic oneness of men and women: “They (your wives) are your clothing, and you are a garment for them.” (2:187) When we enter into the connection of marriage, we safeguard each other’s chastity, just as we do when we wear clothes to cover our nakedness.

  • This is because a good woman, by marrying a decent man, assists him in remaining on the road of righteousness throughout his life.
  • “When a guy marries, he has accomplished one-half of his religious obligations,” he explained.
  • The following are the statements from the Qur’an that explain the rationale for marriage: And one of His signs is that He has chosen for you mates from among yourself, so that you may live in peace with them; and He has placed love and kindness between you and your mates.
  • (30:21) The Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him) had a lot of nice things to say about virtuous and chaste females.

The future khalif, ‘Umar, was reportedly instructed by him: “Shall I not enlighten you about the greatest treasure that man can amass?” The kind of woman who pleases her husband while he looks at her and who protects herself when he is away from her.” On other times, the Prophet stated, “The finest possession a man can have is a thankful heart, a remembering tongue (about Allah), and a believing woman who supports his religious beliefs.” “The world, the entirety of it, is a commodity, and the best of the world’s commodities is a virtuous woman,” says the author once more.

Women were frequently treated worse than animals prior to the arrival of Islam.

He exhorted them to be friendly to one another.

“A Muslim must not despise his wife, and if he is dissatisfied with one of her undesirable characteristics, he should be delighted with one of her positive characteristics.” “The more courteous and compassionate a Muslim is to his wife, the more perfect in religion he is,” the Prophet Muhammad said.

  • His message called on those present, and through them, all Muslims who would follow later, to be courteous and considerate of other people’s women.
  • As a result of Allah’s blessing, you have legally married them and made their bodies lawful in accordance with Allah’s command.
  • She has the authority to enter into any contract or make a bequest in her own name.
  • She has complete freedom in choose who will be her spouse.
  • In fact, the Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him) was vehemently opposed to this practice.
  • She inquired about charitable donations, but A’isha was unable to locate anything other than a date, which was handed to her.
  • Then she got to her feet and walked away.

The biggest tragedy that may befall a woman is when her husband goes away and she is left with the task of providing for their children.

The Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him) was a strong advocate for widows.

In a period when widows were very seldom permitted to remarry, the Prophet urged his people to marry widows who were available.

According to Abu Hurairah, the Prophet said: “One who makes attempts (to help) the widow or a poor person is like a mujahid (fighter) on Allah’s road, or like one who rises up for prayers at night and fasts throughout the day.” In Islam, women who are mothers are held in high regard.

It exhorts Muslims to show respect to their mothers and to provide excellent service to them, even if they are still unbelievers.

According to Abu Hurairah, a man approached the Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him) and inquired: “O Messenger of Allah, who is the one who has the most right on me in terms of compassion and attention?” Hereplied,”Yourmother.” “Thenwho?” “Your mum,” he responded.

“And if not you, who?” According to another version, the Prophet counseled a believer not to fight in the war against the Quraishins in defense of Islam, but instead to care after his mother, stating that his service to his mother would be a cause of his salvation.

The Prophet (peace be upon him) was approached by Jahimah, who addressed him as “Messenger of Allah!”, according to Mu’awiyah, the son of Jahimah.

The Prophet’s followers accepted his teachings and used them to bring about a shift in their societal attitudes regarding women and girls.

For the first time, women were granted the opportunity to inherit a portion of their husband’s estate.

If necessary, they fought alongside the soldiers, bringing supplies and nursing them back to their respective positions.

It was stated by A’isha that SaudahbintZam’ahwent out one night.

The Prophet (peace be upon him) was eating supper in her chamber when she went back to tell him about it, and he responded by saying, “It is permissible by Allah for you to go out and get what you need.” With regard to men and women, the predominant idea in Islamic teachings is that a husband and wife should be full-fledged partners in making their home a happy and prosperous place, that they should be loyal and faithful to one another, and that they should be genuinely interested in each other’s and their children’s welfare.

In order to humanize her spouse and lessen the sternness that is inherent in his character, women are required to exert a humanizing effect over him.

The Prophet placed a strong emphasis on each of these qualities (peace be upon him).

“Among my followers, the best of men are those who are the best to their wives, and the best of women are those who are the best to their husbands,” he explained.

Again, among my followers, the greatest of women are those who support their husbands in their job and who adore them unconditionally, with the exception of those who violate Allah’s prohibitions.” “What are the rights that a wife has over her husband?” Mu’awiyah once inquired of the Prophet (peace be upon him).

  • “There is no woman who removes something in order to replace it in its proper place, with a view to destroying her husband’s house, but Allah recognizes it as a virtue for her,” he explained.
  • It distinguishes them primarily in the physical sphere by applying the equitable principle of fair division of labor to their respective industries.
  • It devolves the majority of the responsibility for managing the household and raising and teaching children to women, a responsibility that is critical in the process of establishing a healthy and affluent community.
  • As a result, the Shari’ah mandates a man, as the leader of the family, to confer with his family before making any choices that affect the family.
  • Any breach of this principle exposes him to the possibility of losing Allah’s favor, because his wife is not his subordinate, but rather, in the words of the Prophet (peace be uponhim), “thequeen of her house,” and this is the position that a true believer is expected to accord his wife.

The Western discourse on women’s freedom or emancipation, in contrast to the enlightened teachings of Islam on women’s respect, is really a veiled form of exploitation of her body, loss of her honor, and degradation of her spirit!

As an imam, this is what I say when people ask about women and Islam

International Women’s Day is a monumental occasion that should serve as a constant reminder that we must uphold its ideals on every other day of the year. This year, more than ever, men have a responsibility to participate in the discourse about women’s rights and to do all in their power to advance those rights in their communities. It is not just the duty of women. Women’s roles in Islam are frequently brought up in conversation with me. Despite popular belief, women are a vital element of both Islam and British culture.

Therefore, it is past time for us to champion the achievements of Muslim women such as Malala Yousafzai, Mishal Husain, and Nadiya Hussain, who are shining a positive light on the contribution that Muslim women make to British society and who provide role models for young girls across Britain and around the world.

  1. There is no denying that they have had to struggle for equality at every step of the way, despite the fact that they are women.
  2. The significance of International Women’s Day: Why do we commemorate it I’ll never be able to comprehend the struggle that women go through on a daily basis.
  3. From domestic abuse to honour-based violence, being denied admission to particular mosques, or having their headscarves torn off by an insensitive member of the public, it is past time for women to be treated equally and with decency in all aspects of their lives.
  4. In recent years, we have witnessed some distressing reports in the press about certain British Muslims, particularly those of Pakistani descent, who have been disproportionately implicated in the grooming of vulnerable females in their communities.
  5. None of these behaviors are representative of Islam, nor are they representative of our communities or civilization.
  6. In the face of radical narratives claiming that Islam oppresses women, I will not stand by and do nothing.
  7. Criminal sexual offenders inflict nothing but shame onto their faith, as well as upon their families, friends, and entire communities.
  8. We must also struggle to safeguard and defend women.
  9. The true issue here is the exploitation of those who are most vulnerable.
  10. Female members of our communities, whether at work or at a mosque, must be respected and embraced.

A woman’s power should be appreciated and encouraged rather than attacked or silenced. Qari Asim MBE is the senior imam of Leeds Makkah Masjid (Mosque) and the senior editor of ImamsOnline.com. He is also a member of the Order of the British Empire.

Women in Islam: Qur’anic ideals versus Muslim realities

This is an extremely significant anniversary, and it should serve as a constant reminder that we must live up to its ideals on every other day of the year as well. This year, more than ever, men have a responsibility to participate in the discourse about women’s rights and to do all in their power to advance those rights for women. Women are not the only ones who must bear this burden. Women’s roles in Islam are frequently brought up in conversation, and I like answering them. Despite popular belief, women are an important element of both Islam and British society.

Therefore, it is past time for us to celebrate the achievements of Muslim women such as Malala Yousafzai, Mishal Husain, and Nadiya Hussain, who are shining a positive light on the contributions that Muslim women make to British society and who provide role models for young girls across Britain and around the world.

There is no denying that they have had to struggle for equality at every step of the way, despite the fact that they are successful.

How and why we commemorate International Women’s Day Every day, women go through a battle that I can never completely comprehend.

From domestic abuse to honour-based violence, from being denied admission to some mosques to having their headscarves torn off by an ignorant member of the public, it is past time for women to be treated equally and with decency in all aspects of their lives.

In the same way that people who are misusing my faith in their battle against Isis are abhorrent, so are these individuals’ activities.

The use of Islam in the service of regressive demands – such as forced marriage, honour killing, or social and economic marginalization – cannot and will not be permitted.

Racist organizations such as the English Defence League, which argue that the actions of a few represent the entirety of Islam, only serve to inflame Islamophobia more.

As a society, we must be firm in identifying and condemning those who commit crimes, whether they are extremists on the right or members of the Muslim community.

When calling someone out for doing anything unlawful, focusing on their ethnicity or religion detracts attention away from the main issue.

On International Women’s Day, I want to encourage the men in my congregation to begin by appreciating the women in their lives for the sacrifices they have made – no matter how minor – and to take some time to consider what it may be like to be a woman in other parts of the globe.

A woman’s fortitude should be appreciated and encouraged – not attacked or silenced – as British Muslim women face increased disparities and discrimination in the workplace and in society.

As the senior imam of Leeds Makkah Masjid (Mosque) and the senior editor of ImamsOnline.com, Qari Asim MBE is a well-known figure in the Muslim community in the United Kingdom.

Similar articles

  • International Women’s Day is a monumental occasion that should serve as a constant reminder to us that we must live up to its ideals on every other day of the year. This year, more than ever, men have a responsibility to participate in the discourse and to do all in their power to advance women’s rights. It is not only the duty of women. I am frequently questioned about the position of women in Islam. Despite popular belief, women are an important element of both Islam and British culture. In the eyes of God, men and women are treated equally in the Quran. It is past time to celebrate the achievements of Muslim women such as Malala Yousafzai, Mishal Husain, and Nadiya Hussain, who are shining a positive light on the contribution that Muslim women make to British society and who provide role models for young girls across the country and around the world. Islam has granted women the same fundamental rights as males to life, property, and expression as it has done for more than 14 centuries. It cannot be argued, however, that despite this, they have had to battle for equality at every turn. Men have long attempted to exert control over their finances, views, and fundamental rights to life, but the time has come to “Times Up” on those controls
  • It is now time for a shift in societal attitudes. Why do we commemorate International Women’s Day? I’ll never be able to comprehend the struggle that women face on a daily basis. That being said, I am aware of the conflict and observe suffering in society as well as in the Muslim community, which I believe must be ended. From domestic abuse to honour-based violence, from being denied admission to some mosques to having headscarves pulled off by an ignorant member of the public, it is past time for women to be treated equally and with dignity. Young Muslim volunteers bring a bunch of elderly folks to a Christmas luncheon in a ‘beautiful’ act of kindness. Unfortunately, certain horrifying cases of British Muslims and individuals of Pakistani descent being disproportionately implicated in the localized grooming of young girls have been reported in the news. Their acts are just as heinous as those who use my faith as a tool in their battle against Isis. None of these activities is representative of Islam, nor are they representative of our communities or society. The use of Islam in the service of regressive demands – such as forced marriage, honour killing, or social and economic isolation – cannot and can not be permitted. In the face of radical narratives claiming that Islam oppresses women, I refuse to stand by and keep silent. White nationalist organizations such as the English Defence League simply serve to inflame Islamophobia by arguing that the actions of a few represent the whole Muslim community. Sexual criminals bring nothing but disgrace onto their faith, their families, and their communities. We must be firm in identifying and calling out criminals, whether they are members of the far-right or members of the Muslim community, and we must act to safeguard and defend women. When calling someone out for doing anything unlawful, focusing on their ethnicity or religion takes attention away from the true issue. The actual issue here is the exploitation of those who are most in need. On International Women’s Day, I want to encourage the men in my congregation to begin by appreciating the women in their lives for the sacrifices they have made – no matter how minor – and to take some time to consider what it must be like to be a woman anywhere in the world. Women in our communities, whether at work or at a mosque, must be respected and embraced. The inequality and prejudice faced by Muslim women in the United Kingdom are becoming more severe. A woman’s power should be appreciated and encouraged, not attacked or silenced. Qari Asim MBE is the senior imam of Leeds Makkah Masjid (Mosque) and the senior editor of ImamsOnline.com. He is also a member of the Order of the Islamic Scholars.

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