What Is An Imam In Islam? (Perfect answer)

The word “imam” in the Koran (the Muslim sacred text) refers to Abraham and other leaders. Though anyone leading a Muslim prayer may be called an imam, in practice imams are revered leaders with years of study behind them. They lead prayers, deliver sermons, and provide religious education and counseling.

Does an imam belong to the Islam religion?

  • Imam, Arabic imām (“leader,” “model”), in a general sense, one who leads Muslim worshippers in prayer. In a global sense, imam is used to refer to the head of the Muslim community (ummah). The title is found in the Qurʾān several times to refer to leaders and to Abraham.

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Who is the highest Imam in Islam?

The Grand Imam of al-Azhar (Arabic: الإمام الأكبر), also known as Grand Sheikh of al-Azhar (Arabic: شيخ الأزهر الشريف), currently Ahmed el-Tayeb, is a prestigious and a prominent official title in Egypt.

What are the responsibilities of an Imam?

The Imam recites the verses and words of prayer, either aloud or silently depending on the prayer, and the people follow his movements. During the service, he stands facing away from the worshipers, toward the direction of Mecca. For each of the five daily prayers, the Imam is present at the mosque to lead the prayers.

Can woman become an Imam?

The imams and all the congregants are women and men are not allowed into the buildings. A handful of women have been trained as imams in order to serve these mosques. However, in at least some communities where these mosques operated, women were not allowed in the men’s mosques.

Can an imam marry?

It continues in part because an imam is not required to solemnize a marriage in the Islamic faith. But Slimi insists that all nikahs or marriages, whether conducted by an imam or not, should be registered with the authorities to ensure that they comply with the law.

Who wrote the Quran?

The Prophet Muhammad disseminated the Koran in a piecemeal and gradual manner from AD610 to 632, the year in which he passed away. The evidence indicates that he recited the text and scribes wrote down what they heard.

How is a person chosen to become an imam?

The person that should be chosen, according to Hadith, is one who has most knowledge of the Quran and Sunnah (prophetic tradition) and is of good character.

What are the conditions of being an imam?

Rules for being an imam include demonstration of high morals and ethical standards that are above reproach. He must be pure, praiseworthy and deeply spiritual, according to Darul Figh. An imam must infallibly follow all of the laws of Islam and avoid errors in his everyday life.

How much is an imam?

The Twelve Imams, together with Prophet Mohammed and his daughter Fatimah al-Zahra, make up the fourteen infallible according to the Shia Islam faith. They are seen as divinely guided leaders and are the holiest people in Islam Religion.

How do females pray in Islam?

The Mother of the Believers, Umm Salama, may God be pleased with her, said that a woman should pray in a hijab consisting of the veil and a shield or a robe so that the backs of her feet are covered from the view of others.

What is the wife of a sheikh called?

A daughter or wife or mother of a sheikh is also called a shaykhah. Currently, the term shaykhah is commonly used for women of ruling families in the Arab states of the Arabian Peninsula.

Can male and female pray together?

Keeble is now leading a new Berkeley, California, mosque that says men and women are welcome to worship together. It’s long been a tradition of the Muslim faith that men and women pray separately — sometimes in different parts of the same room, sometimes in different rooms or divided by a partition.

Does an imam get paid?

Imams only make around $30,000 annually and rarely receive a housing stipend. Many hold second jobs teaching in Muslim schools or as shop owners. They can earn a few thousand more if their mosque is funded by outside contributors.

Is divorce allowed in Islam?

Divorce in Islam can take a variety of forms, some initiated by the husband and some initiated by the wife. The main traditional legal categories are talaq (repudiation), khulʿ (mutual divorce), judicial divorce and oaths.

What is wife called in Islam?

Make your wife smile coz a married woman in Islam is called ” Rabbaitul bait ” means queen of the home.

Imam – Wikipedia

The post of imam (Arabic: imm; plural: aimmah) is a position of leadership in Islam. For Sunni Muslims, the term “Imam” is most usually used to refer to the person who leads the congregation in prayer at a mosque. Imams may be called upon to lead Islamic worship services, function as community leaders, and give religious guidance in this setting. The Imams, according to Shia Muslims, are the spiritual leaders of the Islamic community, orummahafter the Prophet. Shias believe that the word is solely relevant to members of Ahl al-Bayt, the family of the Islamic ProphetMuhammad, who are deemed infallibles by the Twelve Shia schools of thought.

Sunni imams

There are no imams in the Sunni branch of Islam in the same way that there are in the Shi’a branch, which is a fundamental distinction that is sometimes ignored by people outside of the Islamic religion. In everyday terms, the imam for Sunni Muslims is the person who leads Islamic formal (Fard) prayers, even when they are performed outside of the mosque, whenever prayers are performed in groups of two or more people, with one person leading (the imam) and the others copying his ritual actions of worship.

Although not all mosques have an imam to lead the (congregational) prayers, all mosques do have someone to lead the prayers, and this person is often a member of the gathering congregation rather than an officially designated paid person.

A good reputation and extensive knowledge of the Quran and Sunnah (prophetic tradition) are required, according to Hadith, of the individual who should be selected for this position.

As well as the Muslim academics who developed the analytical disciplines connected to Hadith, it may also refer to the chiefs of Muhammad’s family during their respective generational periods (see below).

Imam

Occupation
Occupation type vocation
Activity sectors religion
Description
Competencies Knowledge of Quran and Sunnah, religious devotion
Education required Madrassa,İmam Hatip schoolor university education
Fields of employment Mosque
Related jobs Mufti

The position of imams in Turkey

Imams are appointed by the government to operate in mosques, and they are expected to be graduates of anmam Hatip high school or to hold a bachelor’s degree in theology from a recognized institution. This is an official job governed by the Presidency of Religious Affairs in Turkey, and only men are assigned to it, whilst female officials working for the same state organization serve as preachers, Qur’an course instructors, and religious services specialists, among other things.

These figures are believed to be members of the Hanafi school of Islam, which is a Sunni sect. An imam is a key individual in an Islamic movement, such as theImam Nawawi in Syria, who is also known as the leader of the movement.

Shia imams

In the Shi’a context, an imam is not only depicted as the man of God par excellence, but also as completely engaging in the titles, traits, and deeds that are traditionally reserved for God alone in the Christian tradition. Imams have a more fundamental religious connotation, referring to religious leaders in a community. These imams, according to TwelverandIsmailiShia belief, have been appointed by God to serve as ideal models for the faithful and to guide all of mankind in all parts of existence.

This group of leaders must be obeyed since they have been selected by God.

Twelver

An alphabetical list of the TwelversShia imams is shown below.

Number Name (Full/ Kunya) Title (Arabic / Turkish) Birth–Death (CE / AH) Importance Birthplace (present day country) Place of death and burial
1 Ali ibn Abu Talibعلي بن أبي طالب


Abu al-Hassan or Abu al-Husaynأبو الحسین or أبو الحسن
Amir al-Mu’minin(Commander of the Faithful)


Birinci Ali
600–661


23 BH–40
The firstimamandsuccessor of MuhammadinShia Islam; however, theSunnisacknowledge him as thefourth Caliphas well. He holds a high position in almost allSufiMuslim orders(Turuq); the members of these orders trace their lineage to Muhammad through him. Mecca,Saudi Arabia Assassinated byAbd-al-Rahman ibn Muljam, aKharijiteinKufa, who slashed him with a poisoned sword.Buried at theImam Ali MosqueinNajaf,Iraq.
2 Hassan ibn Aliالحسن بن علي


Abu Muhammad أبو محمد
al-Mujtaba


İkinci Ali
624–670


3–50
He was the eldest surviving grandson ofMuhammadthrough Muhammad’s daughter,Fatimah Zahra. Hasan succeeded his father as the caliph inKufa, and on the basis of peace treaty withMuawiya I, he relinquished control ofIraqfollowing a reign of seven months. Medina,Saudi Arabia Poisoned by his wife inMedina,Saudi Arabia.Buried inJannat al-Baqi.
3 Husayn ibn Aliالحسین بن علي


Abu Abdillah أبو عبدالله
Sayed al-Shuhada


Üçüncü Ali
626–680


4–61
He was a grandson ofMuhammad. Husayn opposed the validity ofCaliphYazid I. As a result, he and his family were later killed in theBattle of Karbalaby Yazid’s forces. After this incident, thecommemoration of Husayn ibn Alihas become a central ritual in Shia identity. Medina,Saudi Arabia Killed onDay of Ashura(10 Muharram) and beheaded at theBattle of Karbala.Buried at theImam Husayn ShrineinKarbala,Iraq.
4 Ali ibn al-Husseinعلي بن الحسین


Abu Muhammad أبو محمد
al-Sajjad, Zain al-Abedin


Dördüncü Ali
658-9– 712


38–95
Author of prayers inSahifa al-Sajjadiyya, which is known as “The Psalm ofthe Household of the Prophet.” Medina,Saudi Arabia According to most Shia scholars, he was poisoned on the order of Caliphal-Walid IinMedina,Saudi Arabia.Buried inJannat al-Baqi.
5 Muhammad ibn Aliمحمد بن علي


Abu Ja’far أبو جعفر
al-Baqir al-Ulum(splitting open knowledge)


Beşinci Ali
677–732


57–114
Sunni and Shia sources both describe him as one of the early and most eminentlegal scholars, teaching many students during his tenure. Medina,Saudi Arabia According to some Shia scholars, he was poisoned by Ibrahim ibn Walid ibn ‘Abdallah inMedina,Saudi Arabiaon the order of CaliphHisham ibn Abd al-Malik.Buried inJannat al-Baqi.
6 Ja’far ibn Muhammadجعفر بن محمد


Abu Abdillah أبو عبدالله
al-Sadiq (the Trustworthy)


Altıncı Ali
702–765


83–148
Established theJa’fari jurisprudenceand developed theTheology of Shia. He instructed many scholars in different fields, includingAbu HanifahandMalik ibn Anasinfiqh,Wasil ibn AtaandHisham ibn HakaminIslamic theology, andJābir ibn Hayyānin science andalchemy. Medina,Saudi Arabia According to Shia sources, he was poisoned inMedina,Saudi Arabiaon the order of CaliphAl-Mansur.Buried inJannat al-Baqi.
7 Musa ibn Ja’farموسی بن جعفر


Abu al-Hassan I أبو الحسن الأول
al-Kazim


Yedinci Ali
744–799


128–183
Leader of the Shia community during the schism ofIsmailiand other branches after the death of the former imam,Jafar al-Sadiq.He established the network of agents who collectedkhumsin the Shia community of theMiddle Eastand theGreater Khorasan. Medina,Saudi Arabia Imprisoned and poisoned inBaghdad,Iraqon the order of CaliphHarun al-Rashid. Buried in theKazimayn shrinein Baghdad.
8 Ali ibn Musaعلي بن موسی


al-Rida, Reza


Sekizinci Ali
765–817


148–203
Made crown-prince by CaliphAl-Ma’mun, and famous for his discussions with both Muslim and non-Muslim religious scholars. Medina,Saudi Arabia According to Shia sources, he was poisoned inMashad,Iranon the order of Caliph Al-Ma’mun. Buried in theImam Reza shrineinMashad.
9 Muhammad ibn Aliمحمد بن علي


Abu Ja’far أبو جعفر
al-Taqi, al-Jawad


Dokuzuncu Ali
810–835


195–220
Famous for his generosity and piety in the face of persecution by theAbbasidcaliphate. Medina,Saudi Arabia Poisoned by his wife, Al-Ma’mun’s daughter,inBaghdad,Iraqon the order of CaliphAl-Mu’tasim. Buried in theKazmain shrinein Baghdad.
10 Ali ibn Muhammadعلي بن محمد


Abu al-Hassan III أبو الحسن الثالث
al-Hadi, al-Naqi


Onuncu Ali
827–868


212–254
Strengthened the network ofdeputiesin the Shia community. He sent them instructions, and received in turn financial contributions of the faithful from thekhumsand religious vows. Surayya, a village nearMedina,Saudi Arabia According to Shia sources, he was poisoned inSamarra,Iraqon the order of CaliphAl-Mu’tazz.Buried in theAl Askari Mosquein Samarra.
11 Hassan ibn Aliالحسن بن علي


Abu Muhammad أبو محمد
al-Askari


Onbirinci Ali
846–874


232–260
For most of his life, the Abbasid Caliph,Al-Mu’tamid, placed restrictions on him after the death of his father. Repression of the Shi’ite population was particularly high at the time due to their large size and growing power. Medina,Saudi Arabia According to Shia, he was poisoned on the order of CaliphAl-Mu’tamidinSamarra,Iraq. Buried inAl Askari Mosquein Samarra.
12 Muhammad ibn al-Hassanمحمد بن الحسن


Abu al-Qasim أبو القاسم
al-Mahdi, Hidden Imam,al-Hujjah


Onikinci Ali
868–unknown


255–unknown
According to Twelver doctrine, he is the current imam and the promisedMahdi, a messianic figure who will return withJesus. He will reestablish the rightful governance of Islam and replete the earth with justice and peace. Samarra,Iraq According to Shia doctrine, he has been living in theOccultationsince 872, and will continue as long as God wills it.
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Fatimah, also known as Fatimah al-Zahraa, the daughter of Muhammed (615–632), is likewise regarded infallible, however she is not recognized an Imam by the Islamic community. The Shi’a believe that the 12th Imam, Mahdi, will one day appear on the Day of Resurrection, and that he will be the last Imam (Qiyamah).

Ismaili

For more on Ismaili imams, seeImamah (Ismaili ideology) andList of Ismaili imams.

Zaidi

See the sections on Zaidiyyah, Islamic history of Yemen, and Imams of Yemen for further information.

Imams as secular rulers

Imams have held positions of secular and religious authority at various periods. The Kharijite or Ibadisects lived in Oman, and this was the situation there. At times, the imams were chosen by the congregation. Sometimes the role was passed down via family, like with theYaruba dynasty, who reigned from 1624 and 1742. For further information, see List of Oman’s monarchs, which includes theRustamid dynasty (776–909), the Nabhani dynasty (1154–1624), the Yaruba dynasty (16424–1742), and the Al Said dynasty (1744–present).

Imams were secular as well as spiritual leaders in theZaidiShiitesect, and they ruled Yemen for more than a thousand years until the Arab Spring.

(See the sections on Zaidiyyah, Yemeni History, and Yemeni Imams for further information.) In Iran, Ruhollah Khomeini is referred to as the Imam, which is an official title.

Gallery

  • In North Africa, an imam is presiding over prayer
  • An imam in Bosnia and Herzegovina, around 1906
  • An imam in Omdurman, Sudan
  • A Bosniak military imam in the Austro-Hungarian Army
  • An imam in Bosnia and Herzegovina, circa 1906
  • And an imam in Omdurman, Sudan. Imam Thierno Ibrahima Thiello is a Tbilisi-based Georgian Muslim imam who practices Islam.

Muftis

  • Grand Mufti Mirza Huseyn Qayibzade of Tbilisi
  • Ottoman Grand Mufti
  • Mufti delivering a sermon
  • Grand Mufti Mirza Huseyn Qayibzade of Tbilisi

Shaykh

  1. Corbin 1993, p. 30
  2. Dhami, Sangeeta
  3. Sheikh, Aziz
  4. Corbin 1993, p. 30 (November 2000). “The Muslim family,” says the author. Western Journal of Medicine, volume 173, number 5, pages 352–356. 10.1136/ewjm.173.5.352.ISSN0093-0415.PMC1071164.PMID11069879
  5. “Presidency of Religious Affairs.”
  6. “Presidency of Religious Affairs.” Ali Amir-Moezzi, Ali Amir-Moezzi (2008). Spirituality and Islam are intertwined. ISBN 9781845117382
  7. Tauris Publishing, London
  8. P. 103. The imam’s Arabic titles are employed by the majority of Twelver Shia who adhere to theArabicas aliturgical language, including the Usooli, Akhbari, and Shakhi sects, as well as the Alawi sect to a lesser extent. The Alevi, a Twelver fringe sect that accounts for around 10% of the world’s Shia population, commonly address themselves in Turkish titles. As a result, the titles of each imam are literally translated as “First Ali,” “Second Ali,” and so on. Philip Mattar is the author of this work (2004). The modern Middle East and North Africa are covered in detail in this encyclopedia. Michigan: Macmillan Reference USA, ISBN 9780028657691
  9. The abbreviation CE refers to the Common Erasolar calendar, whereas AH refers to the Islamic Hijrilunar calendar
  10. The abbreviation AH refers to the Islamic Hijrilunar calendar
  11. Ali, Seyyed Hossein Nasr, abcdeNasr, Seyyed Hossein.”Ali.” The online version of the Encyclopaedia Britannica. retrieved on October 12, 2007
  12. Abcdefghijkl Philip Mattar is the author of this work (2004). The modern Middle East and North Africa are covered in detail in this encyclopedia. Detroit, Mich.: Macmillan Reference USA, ISBN 9780028657691
  13. Tabatabae (1979), pp.190-192
  14. Tabatabae (1979), p.192
  15. Ab”Hasan.”Encyclopaedia Britannica Online. Detroit, Mich.: Macmillan Reference USA, ISBN 9780028657691
  16. Tab Tabatabae (1979), pp.194–195
  17. Madelung, Wilferd. Archived from the original on 2007-11-08. ‘Hasan ibn Ali’ is an entry in the Encyclopaedia Iranica. “al-Husayn” in the Encyclopedia Britannica Online (accessed on 2008-03-23)
  18. Tabatabae (1979), page 195
  19. Abccd”al-Husayn”.Encyclopaedia Britannica Online. Archived from the original on 2007-11-08
  20. Tabatabae (1979), pp.196–199
  21. Calmard, Jean. Encyclopedia Iranica entry on “Husayn ibn Ali.” Madelung, Wilferd (2008-03-23)
  22. AbcdMadelung, Wilferd. Al-Baqir B. Al-Encyclopaedia Osayn’s Iranica is a reference work on the Iranian language. It was retrieved on November 8, 2007
  23. AbcdeTabatabae (1979), p.202
  24. AbcdeMadelung, Wilferd. “AL-BAQER, ABU JAFAR MOHAMMAD,” Encyclopaedia Iranica, accessed April 25, 2019. Tabatabae (1979), p.203
  25. AbcdeTabatabae (1979), p.203-204
  26. “Wil ibn A”.Encyclopaedia Britannica Online
  27. “Wil ibn A”.Encyclopaedia Britannica Online. Retrieved 2007-11-08. Wilferd abMadelung’s birthday is January 1st, 2019. “‘AL-HADD” is an entry in the Encyclopaedia Iranica. abcdefTabatabae (1979), pp.205–207
  28. AbcdefTabatabae (1979), p. 207
  29. AbcdefMadelung, Wilferd. “‘AL-HADD” is an entry in the Encyclopaedia Iranica. retrieved on 2007-11-08
  30. Tatabae (1979), pp.208–209
  31. Abcd.com ASKAR” is an entry in the Encyclopaedia Iranica by Halm, H. Muhammad al-Mahdi al-Hujjah is described in Tabatabae (1979), pp. 209–210
  32. Tabatabae (1979), pp. 209–210
  33. “Muhammad al-Mahdi al-Hujjah” in Encyclopaedia Britannica Online. Tabatabae (1979), pp. 210–211
  34. Tabatabae (1979), pp. 211–214
  35. Miles, Samuel Barrett (2007-11-08)
  36. Tabatabae (1979), pp. 210–211
  37. (1919). Counties and Tribes of the Persian Gulf Region 50, 437. ISBN 978-1-873938-56-0. Published by Garnet Publishing. The following citations were found: Holt, P. M.
  38. Holt, Peter Malcolm
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  40. Bernard Lewis (1977-04-21). The Cambridge History of Islam is a comprehensive history of Islam written by scholars at Cambridge University. 365 pages, ISBN 978-0-521-29137-8 from Cambridge University Press.

General references

  • Henry Corbin is credited with inventing the term “corbin” (1993). The Development of Islamic Philosophy (in French). Liadain Sherrard and Philip Sherrard collaborated on this translation, which was published by Kegan Paul International in cooperation with Islamic Publications for the Institute of Ismaili Studies. It is available online from Encyclopaedia Britannica, Inc., under the title “Encyclopedia Iranica.” ISBN 0-7103-0416-1
  • Encyclopaedia Britannica Onlineby Encyclopaedia Britannica, Inc., under the title “Encyclopedia Iranica.” Encyclopaedia Iranica is a reference work on Iranian culture. Columbia University’s Center for Iranian Studies is located in New York City. The month of March 1997. ISBN1-56859-050-4
  • Martin, Richard C. ISBN1-56859-050-4
  • Martin, Richard C. (2004). Encyclopedia of Islam and the Muslim World, entry on “Imam.” A–L MacMillan, ISBN 0-02-865604-0, Volume 1: Encyclopedia of Islam and the Muslim World
  • Mattar, Philip, ISBN 0-02-865604-0, Volume 2: Encyclopedia of Islam and the Muslim World
  • A–L MacMillan, ISBN 0-02-865604-0, Volume 3: Encyclopedia of Islam and the Muslim World
  • (2004). The modern Middle East and North Africa are covered in detail in this encyclopedia. Detroit, Michigan: Macmillan Reference USA, ISBN 9780028657691
  • Momen, Moojan
  • Momen, Moojan (1985). Shi’i Islam: The History and Doctrines of the Twelve Imams is an introduction to Shi’i Islam. ISBN 0-300-03531-4
  • Abdulaziz Abdulhussein Sachedina
  • Yale University Press
  • ISBN 0-300-03531-4
  • (1988). In Shiite Islam, the Just Ruler (al-sultan Al-dil) is referred to as the Comprehensive Authority of the Jurist (al-sultan Al-dil) in Imamite Jurisprudence. ISBN 0-19-511915-0
  • Tabatabae, Sayyid Mohammad Hosayn
  • Oxford University Press (United States) ISBN 0-19-511915-0 (1979). Shi’ite Islam is a branch of Islam. Nasr, Seyyed Hossein provided the translation. The State University of New York Press, ISBN 0-87395-272-3

External links

In a broad sense, an imam is an Arabic word that means “leader” or “model,” and refers to someone who leads Muslim believers in prayer. In the past, the term imami was used to refer to the leader of the Muslim community on a worldwide scale (ummah). The term appears multiple times in the Qur’an, and it is used to refer to both leaders and Abraham. The origins and foundations of the position of imam were imagined in different ways by different portions of the Muslim community, with this distinction serving as a component of the political and religious foundation for the division of Islam into SunniandShia Islam, respectively.

  1. He was selected by men and, despite the fact that he was prone to mistake, he was to be followed even if he personally sinned, so long as he adhered to the Islamic laws and regulations.
  2. Islam: A Quiz from Britannica What is your level of knowledge about the Prophet Muhammad?
  3. With this quiz, you may see how well you know about Islam.
  4. As a result of political disagreements about the succession to Al following his death (661), the Shi’i notion of leadership took on a life of its own, as these loyalists of Al strove to retain leadership among the descendants of Al’ (known asAhl al-Bayt).

After the death of the fourth imam, there was a schism caused by disagreements over how religious knowledge was obtained: while some believed that Zayd ibn Al should be the fifth imam because he had attained the highest level of learning, others believed that Muammad al-Bqir possessed superiorilmby pedigree, and many believed that both were correct.

  • Those who succeeded Muammad al-Bqir as the fifth imam began to construct notions about a distinct, divine ilm that had been passed down supernaturally from generation to generation.
  • Then, in the mid-eighth century, Ismil al-Diq, the son and designated successor of the sixth imam, Jafar al-Diq, died before his father, resulting in a succession problem when Jafar died, which led to a second succession crisis when Jafar died.
  • This sect, known as theIsmliyyah, thought that his son Muammad had succeeded him as the seventh imam, and that the line of imams that followed him had continued into contemporary times, with the Ismli imam now known as theAga Khan as the current imam.
  • But God chose to conceal him in occultation (ghaybah) so that he may return as themahd, an Islamic messianic deliverer, in the final days.
  • The dominance of this party was demonstrated by the choice of the Abbsidcaliphal-Mamn to appoint the faction’s eighth imam, Al al-Ri, as his heir.
  • Another succession problem erupted in the late 9th century when this faction’s 11th imam, Asanal-Askar, died without leaving any known sons to succeed him.
  • This group, known as the Twelver Shiah because they believe in exactly 12 imams, continues to be the most influential Shia sect.

The term Imam has also been employed as an honorific title, and has been bestowed to people such as the theologians Abanfah, al-Shfi, Mlik ibn Anas, Amad ibn Anbal, al-Ghazli, and Muhammad Abduh, among others. Adam Zeidan, one of the editors of the Encyclopaedia Britannica

Understanding the Role of Imam in Islam

This page was last updated on January 25, 2019. What is the role of an Imam? Aside from leading Islamic prayer and rituals, the Imam may also play a more significant role in giving community assistance and spiritual counseling to the congregation.

Choosing an Imam

Photograph by David Silverman/Getty Images An Imam is chosen at the level of the local community. Members of the community select someone who is regarded as intelligent and wise by their peers. The Imam should be well-versed in and comprehend the Quran, as well as be able to recite it accurately and with beauty. Among his peers, the Imam is regarded as a respected member of society. Depending on the community, an Imam may have been selected and employed particularly for the position, as well as receiving additional training.

There is no worldwide regulating organization that supervises Imams; instead, this is done at the local level by the community.

An Imam’s Duties

The major job of an Imam is to oversee the conduct of Islamic worship services at the mosque. In fact, the Arabic term for “imam” literally translates as “to stand in front of,” alluding to the Imam’s position in front of the congregation during prayer. Following his motions, the Imam recites the verses and phrases of prayer, either audibly or quietly depending on the prayer, and the people pay attention to what he says. During the service, he stands with his back to the congregation and his gaze directed toward Mecca.

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On Fridays, the imam is also expected to offer the khutba (prayer) (sermon).

In addition, the Imam conducts all other special prayers, such as those for funerals, for rain, for an eclipse, and other occasions.

Other Roles Imams Serve in the Community

Along with his or her role as a prayer leader, the Imam may also be a member of a wider leadership team in a Muslim congregation. The Imam’s advice can be sought in a variety of personal and religious concerns because he is a well-respected member of the community. He can be approached for spiritual guidance, assistance with a family difficulty, or assistance at other times of need. Among the responsibilities of the Imam are visiting the ill, participating in interfaith outreach projects, performing weddings, and conducting educational events at the mosque, among others.

Imams reach out to young people, encourage them to pursue peaceful endeavors, and educate them on the true interpretation of Islam in the hope that they would not fall prey to mistaken teachings and resort to violence themselves.

Imams and Clergies

Islam does not have a formal clerical structure. Muslims believe that they have a direct line of communication with the Almighty and do not require the intervention of an intermediary. The Imam is merely a position of leadership, for which someone is employed or chosen from among the people of the community. While a full-time Imam may choose to attend specialized training, it is not compulsory. Additionally, the term “Imam” can refer to someone who is in charge of leading the prayer in a more general meaning.

If everyone in the family prays together, a family member can function as the Imam in the home.

The notion of an Imam has taken on a more important clerical position among Shia Muslims in recent years.

The fact that they were chosen by God and are devoid of sin obligates us to adhere to their teachings.

Can Women Be Imams?

A male Imam preside over all congregations at the local level. When a group of women is worshiping together without any men present, a woman may be designated as the Imam of that prayer group. Individual males, or mixed groups of men and women, must be led by a male imam in order to be considered legitimate.

Qualities of an Imam

An imam is a religious leader who has a high position in the Islamic religion. According to the website Al-Islam.org, the imam’s responsibility is to talk with God and communicate God’s words to his people. In return, those who have chosen him get advice, direction, inspiration, and spiritual instruction from the guru. His leadership extends beyond the individual to include social and political leadership for Muslims who pursue their religion.

Duties of an Imam in Islam

The list of responsibilities of imams is broad. Every day consists of conducting prayers at the mosque, visiting the ill, providing crisis counseling to a family in need, educating youth on the principles of Islam, and officiating at weddings, funerals, and other important ceremonies. A further point of interest from the Learning Religions organization is that imams may participate in politics, interfaith talks, and other social activities.

Knowledge of the Quran and Prayers

Members of the Islamic faith turn to the imam for answers and direction, therefore having a thorough understanding of the religion is essential for an imam. The imam must be well-versed in the Quran and the Islamic religion, as well as in spiritual and religious rules and regulations. The rituals of Islam, as well as the hidden and internal implications of its teachings, must be known and understood by him.

Strong Leadership Abilities

While serving as spiritual and religious leader of individual Muslims, the Imam also serves as the social and political leader of the faith as a whole.

While remaining committed to Islamic values and beliefs, he must have the courage to lead properly and do what is best for the Islamic religion in society while remaining true to himself.

Impeccable Morals and Ethics

High morality and ethical standards that are above reproach are required in order to be an imam, according to the rules of Islam. According to Darar Figh, he must be clean, honorable, and genuinely spiritual in his character. An imam is expected to adhere to all of Islam’s commandments without fail and to avoid making mistakes in his daily life. As a leader, he must set a good example and acquire the respect of his followers as well as the general public.

Consciousness with the Divine

Finally, the imam serves as a link or middleman between God, or the divine, and his adherents, acting as a link between them. In order to carry out this responsibility, the imam must be mindful of God, or in direct touch with Allah, at all times. An imam then imparts on this divine, spiritual counsel, and grace to the Muslims who have come under his leadership.

What does ‘Imam’ mean?

Question: Could you help clarify what the term “Imam” refers to? Thank you very much. Imam is a Turkish word that signifies leader, chief, guide, and standard in English. An ‘Imam’ is a religious leader to whom people belong and who they follow in their words or acts. A sacred and revered connotation is not always attached to the title “Imam” when it is used in the Quran’s original Arabic language. It is a label reserved for a select elite who have a position of leadership in their communities, whether it is a positive and righteous leadership position or a terrible and destructive leadership position.

Islam recognizes Imam Ali (a.s.) as a religious leader who was appointed by Prophet Muhammad (saw) by divine revelation.

Sheikh Mansour Leghaei’s full name is Mansour Leghaei Sheikh Mansour Leghaei

Definition of imam

This indicates the grade level of the word based on its difficulty. This indicates the grade level of the word based on its difficulty. Muslim clergyman who performs religious duties at a mosque. the title given to a religious leader or chief in the Muslim faith one of the Shiite religious leaders who came after them in a line of seven or twelve who were believed to be divinely inspired. EVALUATE YOUR KNOWLEDGE OF AFFECT AND EFFECT VERSUS AFFECT! In effect, this exam will determine whether or not you possess the necessary abilities to distinguish between the terms “affect” and “effect.” Despite the wet weather, I was in high spirits on the day of my graduation celebrations.

Origin ofimam

Imami is derived from the Arabic wordimmleader, which means “leader” or “guide.” It was first attested in 1605–15.

OTHER WORDS FROM imam

I·mam·ship,noun

Words nearbyimam

Imagineer,imagineering,imaging,imagism,imago,imam,imamate,imambarah,Imamite,IMAP,IMarEDictionary.com Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, Random House, Inc. published the Unabridged Dictionary in 2012.

How to useimamin a sentence

  • This is when he found his calling as an organizer once more, this time in the area of the West End. He began by organizing a tiny Muslim community, ultimately owning a grocery shop and being appointed as theimam. According to Fairfax County police, an Animam from an Annandale mosque has been accused for allegedly sexually abusing a minor who sought his assistance in 2015. The incident occurred in 2015. Shirzadi has been theimamat of the mosque for the past nine years, according to the police. Following his pardon and release, theimam did interviews in which he expressed regret for his extreme past.
  • The fieryimam is a religious leader. The preacher Mohammed el Fazazi was well-known in Europe and North Africa for his lectures in which he exhorted Muslims to engage in deadly jihad. ImamBheel, as he is known by his neighbors, was included to a list of international traffickers subject to United States penalties in 2009. He further stated that when Noor left the mosque, he joined a hardline club in his hometown that espouses anti-Muslim sentiment. In Germany, a renowned Muslim imam delivered a sermon in which he pleaded with Allah to slay all “Zionist Jews.” Second, ImamAli brought up a topic that has received little attention in the media. With the help of the ImamAli, Fotros was restored to his rightful place after begging for forgiveness. During the previous few years, the Imam has managed to keep the Czar at bay rather well. As a result, the Sultan’s first physician is referred to as Hakim effendi, while the priest in the seraglio is referred to as Imameffendi. The Kajar Shahs had the right to rule solely in the absence of the Imam
  • Otherwise, they had no authority. He obstinately refused to appear, even though the villageimam pleaded with him to do so
  • The villageimam eventually gave up and left. A few days before the fight, he went to Thous and said his prayers in front of the tomb of the Imam Rizk

British Dictionary definitions forimam

The leader of congregational prayer in a mosque is known as a caliph, who is the leader of a Muslim community. A caliph is an honorific title given to eminent doctors of Islam, such as the founders of the orthodox schools, and is one of a succession of either seven or twelve religious leaders of the Shiites who are regarded as divinely inspired by their followers.

Word Origin forimam

C17: derived from Arabic: leader, fromammahe accompanied 2012 Digital Edition of the Collins English Dictionary – Complete Unabridged Edition (William Collins SonsCo. Ltd. 1979, 1986) In 1998, HarperCollinsPublishers published the following books: 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, and 2012.

Imam Facts for Kids

The post of imam (Arabic: imm; plural: aimmah) is a position of leadership in Islam. Among Sunni Muslims, it is most typically used as the title of a worship leader in a mosque and Muslim community. Imams may be called upon to lead Islamic worship services, function as community leaders, and give religious guidance in this setting. Following the Prophet, the Imams are the spiritual leaders of the Islamic community, or ummah, according to Shi’a Muslims. According to the Twelve Shia, the name is solely applicable to members of the Ahl al-Bayt, the family of the Islamic ProphetMuhammad, who are regarded infallibles.

Sunni imams

There are no imams in the Sunni branch of Islam in the same way that there are in the Shi’a branch, which is a fundamental distinction that is sometimes ignored by people outside of the Islamic religion. In everyday terms, the imam for Sunni Muslims is the person who leads Islamic formal (Fard) prayers, even when they are performed outside of the mosque, whenever prayers are performed in groups of two or more people, with one person leading (the imam) and the others copying his ritual actions of worship.

Although not all mosques have an imam to lead the (congregational) prayers, all mosques do have someone to lead the prayers, and this person is often a member of the gathering congregation rather than an officially designated paid person.

A good reputation and extensive knowledge of the Quran and Sunnah (prophetic tradition) are required, according to Hadith, of the individual who should be selected for this position.

Additionally, it may refer to the Muslim academics who developed the analytical sciences associated with Hadith, or it may allude to the leaders of Muhammad’s family during their respective generational periods.

The position of imams in Turkey

Imams are appointed by the government to operate in mosques, and they are expected to be graduates of an accredited Hatip high school or to hold a Theology degree from a recognized institution in order to be appointed. There are only men assigned to this official post in Turkey, which is governed by the Presidency of Religious Affairs. Female officials working for the same state organization serve as preachers, Qur’an course instructors, and religious services specialists, among other things.

These figures are believed to be members of the Hanafi school of Islam, which is a Sunni sect. An imam is a key individual in an Islamic movement, such as theImam Nawawi in Syria, who is also known as the leader of the movement.

Shi’a imams

In the Shi’a context, an imam is not only depicted as the man of God par excellence, but also as completely engaging in the titles, traits, and deeds that are traditionally reserved for God alone in the Christian tradition. Imams have a more fundamental religious connotation, referring to religious leaders in a community. These imams, according to TwelverandIsmailiShia belief, have been appointed by God to serve as ideal models for the faithful and to guide all of mankind in all parts of existence.

This group of leaders must be obeyed since they have been selected by God.

Twelver

An alphabetical list of the TwelversShia imams is shown below.

Number Name(Full/Kunya) Title(Arabic / Turkish) Birth–Death(CE / AH) Importance Birthplace (present day country) Place of death and burial
1 Ali ibn Abu Talib علي بن أبي طالب


Abu al-Hassan or Abu al-Husaynأبو الحسین or أبو الحسن
Amir al-Mu’minin (Commander of the Faithful)


Birinci Ali
600–661


23 BH–40
The first imam and successor of Muhammad inShia Islam; however, theSunnisacknowledge him as thefourth Caliphas well. He holds a high position in almost allSufiMuslim orders(Turuq); the members of these orders trace their lineage to Muhammad through him. Mecca,Saudi Arabia Assassinated by Abd-al-Rahman ibn Muljam, aKharijitein Kufa, who slashed him with a poisoned sword. Buried at theImam Ali MosqueinNajaf,Iraq.
2 Hassan ibn Ali الحسن بن علي


Abu Muhammadأبو محمد
al-Mujtaba


İkinci Ali
624–670


3–50
He was the eldest surviving grandson ofMuhammadthrough Muhammad’s daughter,Fatimah Zahra. Hasan succeeded his father as the caliph in Kufa, and on the basis of peace treaty with Muawiya I, he relinquished control ofIraqfollowing a reign of seven months. Medina,Saudi Arabia Poisoned by his wife inMedina,Saudi Arabia. Buried in Jannat al-Baqi.
3 Husayn ibn Ali الحسین بن علي


Abu Abdillahأبو عبدالله
Sayed al-Shuhada


Üçüncü Ali
626–680


4–61
He was a grandson ofMuhammad. Husayn opposed the validity ofCaliphYazid I. As a result, he and his family were later killed in theBattle of Karbalaby Yazid’s forces. After this incident, the commemoration of Husayn ibn Ali has become a central ritual in Shia identity. Medina,Saudi Arabia Killed onDay of Ashura(10 Muharram) and beheaded at theBattle of Karbala. Buried at the Imam Husayn Shrine inKarbala,Iraq.
4 Ali ibn al-Hussein علي بن الحسین


Abu Muhammadأبو محمد
al-Sajjad, Zain al-Abedin


Dördüncü Ali
658-9 – 712


38–95
Author of prayers in Sahifa al-Sajjadiyya, which is known as “The Psalm ofthe Household of the Prophet.” Medina,Saudi Arabia According to most Shia scholars, he was poisoned on the order of Caliph al-Walid I inMedina,Saudi Arabia. Buried in Jannat al-Baqi.
5 Muhammad ibn Ali محمد بن علي


Abu Ja’farأبو جعفر
al-Baqir al-Ulum (splitting open knowledge)


Beşinci Ali
677–732


57–114
Sunni and Shia sources both describe him as one of the early and most eminent legal scholars, teaching many students during his tenure. Medina,Saudi Arabia According to some Shia scholars, he was poisoned by Ibrahim ibn Walid ibn ‘Abdallah inMedina,Saudi Arabiaon the order of Caliph Hisham ibn Abd al-Malik. Buried in Jannat al-Baqi.
6 Ja’far ibn Muhammad جعفر بن محمد


Abu Abdillahأبو عبدالله
al-Sadiq(the Trustworthy)


Altıncı Ali
702–765


83–148
Established the Ja’fari jurisprudence and developed the Theology of Shia. He instructed many scholars in different fields, includingAbu HanifahandMalik ibn Anasinfiqh, Wasil ibn Ata and Hisham ibn Hakam inIslamic theology, andJābir ibn Hayyānin science andalchemy. Medina,Saudi Arabia According to Shia sources, he was poisoned inMedina,Saudi Arabiaon the order of CaliphAl-Mansur. Buried in Jannat al-Baqi.
7 Musa ibn Ja’far موسی بن جعفر


Abu al-Hassan Iأبو الحسن الأول
al-Kazim


Yedinci Ali
744–799


128–183
Leader of the Shia community during the schism ofIsmailiand other branches after the death of the former imam,Jafar al-Sadiq. He established the network of agents who collected khums in the Shia community of theMiddle Eastand theGreater Khorasan. Medina,Saudi Arabia Imprisoned and poisoned inBaghdad,Iraqon the order of CaliphHarun al-Rashid. Buried in the Kazimayn shrine in Baghdad.
8 Ali ibn Musa علي بن موسی


al-Rida, Reza


Sekizinci Ali
765–817


148–203
Made crown-prince by CaliphAl-Ma’mun, and famous for his discussions with both Muslim and non-Muslim religious scholars. Medina,Saudi Arabia According to Shia sources, he was poisoned inMashad,Iranon the order of Caliph Al-Ma’mun. Buried in theImam Reza shrineinMashad.
9 Muhammad ibn Ali محمد بن علي


Abu Ja’farأبو جعفر
al-Taqi, al-Jawad


Dokuzuncu Ali
810–835


195–220
Famous for his generosity and piety in the face of persecution by theAbbasidcaliphate. Medina,Saudi Arabia Poisoned by his wife, Al-Ma’mun’s daughter, inBaghdad,Iraqon the order of Caliph Al-Mu’tasim. Buried in the Kazmain shrine in Baghdad.
10 Ali ibn Muhammad علي بن محمد


Abu al-Hassan IIIأبو الحسن الثالث
al-Hadi, al-Naqi


Onuncu Ali
827–868


212–254
Strengthened the network of deputies in the Shia community. He sent them instructions, and received in turn financial contributions of the faithful from the khums and religious vows. Surayya, a village nearMedina,Saudi Arabia According to Shia sources, he was poisoned inSamarra,Iraqon the order of Caliph Al-Mu’tazz. Buried in theAl Askari Mosquein Samarra.
11 Hassan ibn Ali الحسن بن علي


Abu Muhammadأبو محمد
al-Askari


Onbirinci Ali
846–874


232–260
For most of his life, the Abbasid Caliph, Al-Mu’tamid, placed restrictions on him after the death of his father. Repression of the Shi’ite population was particularly high at the time due to their large size and growing power. Medina,Saudi Arabia According to Shia, he was poisoned on the order of Caliph Al-Mu’tamid inSamarra,Iraq. Buried inAl Askari Mosquein Samarra.
12 Muhammad ibn al-Hassan محمد بن الحسن


Abu al-Qasimأبو القاسم
al-Mahdi, Hidden Imam, al-Hujjah


Onikinci Ali
868–unknown


255–unknown
According to Twelver doctrine, he is the current imam and the promisedMahdi, a messianic figure who will return withJesus. He will reestablish the rightful governance of Islam and replete the earth with justice and peace. Samarra,Iraq According to Shia doctrine, he has been living in theOccultationsince 872, and will continue as long as God wills it.
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Fatimah, also known as Fatimah al-Zahraa, the daughter of Muhammed (615–632), is likewise regarded infallible, however she is not recognized an Imam by the Islamic community. The Shi’a believe that the 12th Imam, Mahdi, will one day appear on the Day of Resurrection, and that he will be the last Imam (Qiyamah).

Imams as secular rulers

Imams have held positions of secular and religious authority at various periods throughout history. The Kharijite or Ibadisects lived in Oman, and this was the situation there. At times, the imams were chosen by the congregation. At other times, the position was passed down through the family, as was the case with the Yaruba dynasty between 1624 and 1742. For further information, see the List of Oman’s kings, which includes the Rustamid dynasty (776–909), the Nabhani dynasty (1154–1624), the Yaruba dynasty (16424–1742), and the Al Said dynasty (1744–present).

Imams were secular as well as spiritual leaders in theZaidiShiitesect, and they ruled Yemen for more than a thousand years until the Arab Spring.

In Iran, Ruhollah Khomeini is referred to as the Imam, which is an official title.

Gallery

  • Imams from Crimea Tatarstan instruct in the Quran. Carlo Bossoli created the lithograph. In North Africa, an imam is presided over during prayer
  • In the Caucasus, Imam Shamil preside over prayer
  • In Bosnia and Herzegovina, c. 1906
  • In Sudan, an imam in Omdurman
  • And in the Austro-Hungarian Army, an imam from Bosnia and Herzegovina serves as a military imam. Imam Thierno Ibrahima Thiello is a Tbilisi-based Georgian Muslim imam who practices Islam.

Muftis

  • Grand Mufti Mirza Huseyn Qayibzade of Tbilisi
  • Mufti Jakub Szynkiewicz
  • Ottoman Grand Mufti
  • Grand Mufti Talgat Tadzhuddin
  • Mufti giving a sermon
  • Grand Mufti Mirza Huseyn Qayibzade of Tbilisi
  • Grand

Shaykh

  • The Rufai Sufi Order’s Sheykh ul-Islam, Ali bey Huseynzade painted a portrait of Shaykh ul-Islam, who was also known as the Shaykh ul-Islam.

See also

Unless otherwise specified, all information fromKiddle encyclopediaarticles (including the article graphics and facts) is available for free use under theAttribution-ShareAlikelicense unless otherwise noted. This article may be cited as: Imam Facts for Kids. The free encyclopedia Kiddle Encyclopedia

Who Are The 12 Imams Of Twelver Shia Islam?

The Twelve Imams sat together (on the left) and the Mahdi’s victorious return (on the right) are depicted (right). According to Shia Islam, the Twelve Imams, together with Prophet Mohammed and his daughter Fatima al-Zahra, make up the fourteen infallible figures who are considered to be the foundation of the faith. These individuals are regarded as divinely led leaders and as the holiest individuals in the Islamic religion. In Arabic, they are referred to as Ahlulbayt, which literally translates as “household people.” The first five imams, who are the most important of the twelve, are Prophet Muhammad, Imam Ali, Fatima al-Zahra, Imam Hassan, and Imam Husayn.

These holy persons assisted Prophet Mohammed and governed the Muslim community following the prophet’s death, according to Islamic tradition.

While the community was still being guided by the other nine Imams, they focused their efforts on scholarship and heavenly direction. Other Muslims revere the twelve imams because they were divinely appointed and because their wisdom and piety are held up as models for all Muslims to follow.

The Twelver Imams of Shia

Muhammad Ibn Ali (677-732 CE), Ja’far ibn Muhammad (702-765 CE), Musa ibn Ja’far (744-749 CE), Ali ibn Musa (765-817 CE), Muhammad ibn Ali (810-835 CE), Ali Ibn Muhammad (846-874 CE), Hasan ibn Ali (827-868 CE), Muhammad ibn al-Hassan (827-874 CE), and Ali Ibn al (Born 869 CE). Many Shia Muslims believe that the final of these 12 heirs to Muhammad, Muhammad ibn Hasan al-Mahdi, would resurface as the ultimate human rescuer with Isa in order to complete their task of bringing peace and justice to the world, as predicted by the Prophet Muhammad.

Ali Ibn Abu Talib

Ali was Muhammad’s cousin, and eventually his son-in-law through Fatima, as well as the Caliph who lead Muslims in the correct direction. Ali grew up to become the most influential and powerful successor to Muhammad after being born to a powerful Sheikh of the Quraysh tribe. In fact, when Muhammad heard a heavenly summons, he eagerly volunteered to join him in the defense of the newly established faith that they had grown up together as brothers. Ali was persecuted by the Quraysh, and when the Muslims migrated to Medina, Ali accompanied them as they settled there.

This victory brought Muslim victory and earned Ali Muhammad’s approval and acceptance, allowing him to marry Fatima, Muhammad’s only remaining daughter and Ali’s wife.

In the year 661, he was assassinated by Sunni Muslims.

Husayn Ibn Ali

Husayn was the son of Ali ibn Abi alib and a grandson of the Prophet Muhammad. He was born in the city of Mecca in the year 610 CE. Following the death of his brother Hasan ibn Ali, his elder brother, he ascended to the position of Shia Islam’s supreme leader. His father’s followers pledged their support to him. Muawiya I died and his son Yazid I ascended to the throne, Husayn considered the deed a breach of the Hasan-Muawiya pact. Husayn was right to be upset. According to him, the Umayyad were an authoritarian and religiously confused group of people.

He proceeded from Mecca to Kufa after the people of Kufa swore allegiance to him, but the army of Yazid I intercepted his Caravan and slaughtered Husayn and his followers on the arid plains of Karbala, Iraq.

The Martyrdom of Husayn at Karbala was the most significant radical interpretation of Islam in the twentieth century.

He is seen as a virtuous man who was sent to open people’s eyes to the depths of their own self-inflicted sea of sin, but he chose to die so that they may be rescued from their sin.

Muhammad’s followers grieved the Imam because his life had been marked by purity, which had been rewarded by harsh retribution. They remember him for his unwavering commitment to the struggle against moral injustice.

Muhammad Ibn Al-Hasan

Muhammad’s parents, Hasan al-Askari and Narcisi, were married in 869. Following the death of his father, he was given the title of Imam when he was five years old. Muhammad communicated with his followers through the four deputies during his early administration, which lasted 72 years and was known as the Minor Occultation. Following the occultation and just a few days before the death of his fourth deputy, according to legend, he wrote a letter to his followers in which he declared the beginning of a Major Occultation during which he would not be in contact with his people.

Significance of the Twelver Imams

Those who follow the Shia faith believe in the Twelver caliphates and Muhammad as the Mahdi, who they consider to be the ultimate rescuer of humanity. They also believe that Islam will one day dominate the world, and that during its reign, justice and righteousness would be spread across the world. Shia Muslims gained their identity as a result of their trust in the Mahdi. The Shiites believe that none of the twelve perished as a result of natural causes, including death. They were either killed or poisoned because they posed a legal danger to the caliphate’s ability to govern.

The history of the Twelve is founded on revolutionary violence, which the Shia Muslims had to perfect in order to live in the modern world.

These Imams are the cornerstones of the Shia religion, serving as its structural support.

Who Are The Twelve Imams Of Twelver Shia Islam?

Rank The Twelve Imams of Athna‘ashariyyah Lifetime
1 Ali ibn Abu Talib 600-661 CE
2 Hasan ibn Ali 625-670 CE
3 Husayn ibn Ali 626-680 CE
4 Ali ibn Husayn 658-712 CE
5 Muhammad ibn Ali 677-732 CE
6 Ja’far ibn Muhammad 702-765 CE
7 Musa ibn Ja’far 744-749 CE
8 Ali ibn Musa 765-817 CE
9 Muhammad ibn Ali 810-835 CE
10 Ali ibn Muhammad 827-868 CE
11 Hasan ibn Ali ibn Muhammad (Al-Askari) 846-874 CE
12 Muhammad ibn al-Hasan Born 869 CE; Now in Major Occultation as the Mahdi

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