What Type Of Islam Is Isis? (TOP 5 Tips)

ISIL’s ideology represents radical Jihadi-Salafi Islam, a strict, puritanical form of Sunni Islam.

Contents

What is Isis also known as?

ISIS (Islamic State of Iraq and Syria), also known as ISIL (Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant), is a Sunni jihadist group with a particularly violent ideology that calls itself a caliphate and claims religious authority over all Muslims. It was inspired by al Qaida but later publicly expelled from it.

What are the four Islamic sects?

In addition, there are several differences within Sunnī and Shiʿa Islam: Sunnī Islam is separated into four main schools of jurisprudence, namely Hanafi, Maliki, Shafi’i, Hanbali; these schools are named after Abu Hanifa, Malik ibn Anas, al-Shafi’i, and Ahmad ibn Hanbal, respectively.

How many sects of Islam are there?

A disagreement over succession after Mohammed’s death in 632 split Muslims into Islam’s two main sects, Sunni and Shia.

What IS ISIS called in Arabic?

As al-Shām is a region often compared with the Levant or Greater Syria, the group’s name has been variously translated as “Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham”, ” Islamic State of Iraq and Syria ” (both abbreviated as ISIS), or “Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant” (abbreviated as ISIL).

Who IS ISIS God?

Isis was the daughter of the earth god Geb and the sky goddess Nut and the sister of the deities Osiris, Seth, and Nephthys. She was also wife to Osiris, god of the underworld, and bore him a son, Horus. Her cult subsequently spread throughout the Roman Empire, and Isis was worshipped from England to Afghanistan.

Who is founder of Islam?

The Prophet Muhammad and the Origins of Islam. The rise of Islam is intrinsically linked with the Prophet Muhammad, believed by Muslims to be the last in a long line of prophets that includes Moses and Jesus.

What are the 3 subdivision of Islam?

As with all other world religions, Islam is represented by several major branches: Sunni, Shi’a, Ibadi, Ahmadiyya, and Sufism. These branches started to develop after Muhammad’s death when people began to disagree on the successor of the religion.

What is the Hanafi school of thought?

The Hanafi School is one of the four major schools of Sunni Islamic legal reasoning and repositories of positive law. It was built upon the teachings of Abu Hanifa (d. 767), a merchant who studied and taught in Kufa, Iraq, and who is reported to have left behind one major work, Al-Fiqh al-Akbar.

Are Shias allowed in Mecca?

Both Sunni and Shia Muslims share the same five pillars of Islam, the Hajj pilgrimage to Mecca and Medina, Ramadan, the prayer, Chahada, and Zakat. However, Saudia Arabia has forbidden Shia Muslims to perform the sacred Hajj pilgrimage. If individuals refused to identify, they were not allowed in Mecca.

When did Islam begin?

The start of Islam is marked in the year 610, following the first revelation to the prophet Muhammad at the age of 40. Muhammad and his followers spread the teachings of Islam throughout the Arabian peninsula.

What is the Sunni branch of Islam?

Sunni, Arabic Sunnī, member of one of the two major branches of Islam, the branch that consists of the majority of that religion’s adherents. Sunni Muslims regard their denomination as the mainstream and traditionalist branch of Islam —as distinguished from the minority denomination, the Shiʿah.

Is Syria still at war?

A monitor group said 3,746 people were killed in the Syrian civil war in 2021, the 11th year of the conflict in the country. The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said this week that the number includes 1,505 civilians, and among them were 360 children.

Who is the leader of Isis?

Iraq – Level 4: Do Not Travel. Do not travel to Iraq due to terrorism, kidnapping, armed conflict, civil unrest, COVID-19, and Mission Iraq’s limited capacity to provide support to U.S. citizens.

The Islamic State (Terrorist Organization)

  1. The Islamic State (Terrorist Organization) is one of the topics covered by RAND.

Featured

Islamist militant group ISIS (Islamic State of Iraq and Syria), also known as ISIL (Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant), is a Sunni jihadist organization with a particularly violent ideology that proclaims itself a caliphate and claims religious authority over all Muslims. ISIS is a Sunni jihadist group that claims religious authority over all Muslims. It was founded with the support of al Qaida, but was openly dismissed from the organization. terrorist specialists from RAND Corporation have examined the group’s finance, administration, and organization; its shrewd use of social media for recruiting and fundraising; and the instability that produced the group as a regional concern in the Middle East, according to the report.

Stabilizing Eastern Syria After ISIS

  • Islamist militant group ISIS (Islamic State of Iraq and Syria), also known as ISIL (Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant), is a Sunni jihadist organization with a particularly violent ideology that proclaims itself a caliphate and claims religious authority over all Muslims. ISIS is a Sunni jihadist organization that claims religious authority over all Muslims. Inspire by al Qaida but officially removed from the organization after a brief period of deliberation terrorist specialists from RAND Corporation have examined the group’s finance, administration, and organization
  • Its shrewd use of social media for recruiting and fundraising
  • And the instability that produced the group as a regional concern in the Middle East, according to the findings.

Airpower Was Indispensable to Defeating ISIS

  • Some believe that airpower might have been used more aggressively during Operation Inherent Resolve, allowing for a more rapid defeat of the Islamic State. The use of airpower was critical, but ground troops commanded by Iraqi and Syrian allies were also required to completely eliminate the Islamic State as a geographical entity.

Explore The Islamic State (Terrorist Organization)

  • The findings of their interviews with former members of radical organizations are discussed by the co-authors of the RAND report, Violent Extremism in America. Briefing about the research

What Former Extremists and Their Families Say About Radicalization in America

  • In the United States, violent extremism is a developing and persistent problem that must be addressed. Former extremists, as well as their relatives and friends, provide insight on how people get radicalized, how they leave extremist groups, and what communities may do to slow the spread of extremism in their area. a press release

Interviews with Former Extremists Reveal Multiple Paths to Developing Extreme Ideologies; Rejection of Extremism Often.

  • Most commonly, unpleasant life circumstances or propaganda are the catalysts for radicalization, and individuals who flee extremist ideas are supported by a person or group who intervenes to assist them in rejecting the concept. Report

Violent Extremism in America: Firsthand Accounts

  • The attack on the United States Capitol on January 6 underscored the need for greater research to improve violent extremism prevention and deradicalization methods in the United States. Interviews with former extremists and their families give light on the factors that motivate people to join – and subsequently quit – extremist organizations. Briefing about the research

The Role of U.S. Airpower in Defeating ISIS

  • While without contributing a substantial number of ground soldiers, the United States deployed airpower in Syria and Iraq to halt ISIS’s progress and aid in the organization’s demise
  • Press release

Interest in a U.S. Grand Strategy of Restraint May Be Growing, So Advocates Need to Provide More Details

  • As the Biden Administration takes over, some policymakers in the United States have expressed interest in a new approach to America’s role in the world: a realist grand strategy of restraint, under which the United States would cooperate more with other powers, reduce its forward military presence, and terminate or renegotiate some security commitments
  • Report
  • And

A U.S. Grand Strategy of Restraint

  • As the Biden Administration takes over, some policymakers in the United States have expressed interest in a new approach to America’s role in the world: a realist grand strategy of restraint, under which the United States would cooperate more with other powers, reduce its forward military presence, and terminate or renegotiate some security commitments
  • Report
  • And

Social Media and Influence Operations Technologies: Implications for Great Power Competition

  • Russia, China, and the so-called Islamic State are three major U.S. rivals that have taken use of online technology to spread propaganda against the United States. Each of these entities’ online propaganda has certain goals, capabilities, and limits, which are discussed in this chapter. Commentary

The Islamic State in Afghanistan Is Down, but Not Out

  • The Afghan Taliban is on the approach of signing a power-sharing agreement with the Afghan government as part of a peace arrangement mediated by the United States, according to reports. Washington appears to be holding out hope that the agreement would get the country back to its feet. The Islamic State’s Khorasan Province, on the other hand, continues to be a source of concern. The Islamic State in Afghanistan may be defeated, but it is far from defeated. Commentary

Repression in Mozambique Is Stoking an Islamist Insurgency, Risking Wider Unrest

  • While Southern Africa has generally been spared the ravages of violent extremism, the situation in northern Mozambique threatens to destabilize the country and may even extend to other areas of the continent if the situation does not improve. It is possible that the government may develop a less heavy-handed strategy to successfully fight the mounting danger
  • According to the report
You might be interested:  How To Practice Islam? (Best solution)

Weighing U.S. Troop Withdrawal from Iraq

  • In the long run, it is in the best interests of the United States to support a stable and friendly Iraq. Even while this would not need the continuation of the combat aid mission, it would require the retention of a small number of military advisors to assist in training and developing Iraqi capabilities so that the country could defend itself
  • Report

It’s Time to Make a Full and Enduring Commitment to Iraq

  • If the United States abandons its strategic competition in Iraq, it will face consequences. Policymakers in the United States should work to maintain a commitment to Iraq before chances are gone. A substantial, long-term, and small-footprint aid program for the Iraqi Army is the most effective approach to demonstrate that commitment.

Iraq’s Vote to Expel U.S. Troops Is Iran’s True Victory

  • If American forces are forced to leave Iraq, the ramifications might be far-reaching and detrimental to the United States’ strategic interests. In order to restore the relationship between Washington and Baghdad, what choices are left? Commentary

Baghdadi’s Death Will Make Global Affiliates More Independent

  • The death of Islamic State leader and self-proclaimed caliph Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, who was just found dead, is a big setback for the group. Baghdadi has a type of enigmatic charm that the organization coveted. Although he will be replaced, this does not suggest that the Islamic State will just resume operations as usual. Commentary

How the U.S. Withdrawal from Syria Provides a Boost to ISIS

  • President Trump’s decision to remove U.S. forces from Syria may provide the ISIS terrorist group with the time and space it needs to rebuild its organization and expand its networks throughout the Middle East, according to some analysts. The decision’s long-term strategic ramifications might have a ripple effect throughout the area for years to come
  • Commentary

The Syrian Withdrawal: Where Things Stand

  • Because the Trump administration lacks an ordered procedure for making national security decisions, the administration has defaulted to the worst possible option in regards to Syria. The abrupt withdrawal of United States soldiers has created an opening for Russia to take advantage of. It also left the Kurds, who are a close ally of the United States, to face against a Turkish onslaught
  • Journal Article

Winning the Peace in Iraq: Don’t Give Up on Baghdad’s Fragile Democracy

  • In the aftermath of years of conflict, Iraq’s parliamentary government has remained stable and is more concerned with administration than with sectarianism. However, the task is not yet completed, and the author emphasizes the importance of dedication and patience in order to build a sustainable peace.

The Terrorist Threat Posed by Neglect and Indifference

  • When it comes to the aftermath of ISIS, Western countries have appeared to wash their hands of the situation. European people detained in Iraqi and Syrian detention camps are being helped to survive by Western governments’ failure to recognize the threat and instead relying on Iraqi and Syrian Kurds to deal with the situation.

What Is ISIS? The Definitive Guide

When it comes to the aftermath of ISIS, Western countries appear to have thrown their hands in the air. European people detained in detention camps are being helped to survive by Western governments who are ignoring the threat and leaving it to the Iraqis and Syrian Kurds to deal with them.

What is ISIS?

ISIS, also known as the Islamic State in Iraq and Greater Syria, is a radical branch of Al-Qaeda, the terrorist group that launched attacks on New York and Washington D.C. in 2001, igniting a worldwide battle against terrorism. This ultra-conservative branch of Islam believes that restoring Muslim society to the time of the Prophet Mohammed in all aspects of life—from religion to social values to governance—is the purest form of Islam. ISIS adheres to this branch of Islam, which adheres to a strict interpretation of the Quran and adheres to strict interpretations of social values.

When was ISIS formed?

Iraqi insurgents formed the foundation of ISIS in 1999 as a tiny group. But it’s unlikely that you were aware of them until 2014, when they declared themselves a caliphate and launched a campaign of conquest through Iraq and Syria. From 2014 to 2017, ISIS flourished and expanded, both in terms of land claimed and in terms of the terror they incited both in the Middle East and throughout the rest of the globe during that time period. Image used in ISIS propaganda

Is ISIS Sunni or Shia?

ISIS adheres to an extreme interpretation of Sunni Islam, yet the majority of Muslims from all backgrounds, including Sunnis, have condemned the organization. The terrorist organization primarily targeted Shia Muslims for persecution, as well as other religious minorities, in its campaign. Many Sunni people were uprooted or killed as a result of the development of ISIS and the subsequent fight against them. ISIS is adamant about adhering to its ideology at the expense of what most Muslims consider to be the real manifestation of their faith.

What is ISIS fighting for?

A desire to wage holy war, or jihad, against the “enemy of Islam” is behind the cruelty we associate with ISIS, including beheadings, enslavement, amputations, stone peltings, torture, and other atrocities. Anyone who does not adhere to ISIS’s extremist version of Islam is considered an enemy of the organization. It may come as a surprise to many non-Muslims that Shia Muslims are ISIS’s principal targets, but this is not the case. In the Middle East, Sunnis and Shias have been battling for years, and the development of ISIS is regarded as the latest indication of this tragic sectarian rift, among other things.

  • Preemptive Love Coalition photo courtesy of Jeremy Courtney.
  • Shabaks, Alawites, Jews, and Christians have all suffered immensely as a result of ISIS’s reign of terror.
  • ISIS, which refers to itself as “devil worshipers,” carried out a genocide against the Yazidi people, torturing and killing hundreds of males while seizing and subjecting women and children to continuous rape, beatings, and enslavement in their detention centers.
  • Sinjar, the Yazidi homeland, and the surrounding area are still inhabited by a number of armed organizations contending for control of the territory.
  • Consider the following examples of the impact of ISIS’s focused efforts against them: pic.twitter.com/87z3WVE8Vj On April 5, 2019, Nadia’s Initiative (@nadiainitiative) tweeted: ISIS is also well-known for being adept at disseminating its message using modern media.
  • According to a July 2018 study, more than 40,000 foreigners from 110 countries have joined ISIS in Iraq and Syria, with 80 percent of them being males and the remaining 20 percent being women and children in proportion to their numbers.

These include a desire to help their religious brethren or a desire to exact vengeance against oppressive regimes. ISIS recruits misfits and disenfranchised people by giving them a sense of belonging, identities, and prestige.

RELATED: Three Reasons People Joined ISIS

A desire to wage holy war, or jihad, against the “enemies of Islam” is behind the cruelty we associate with ISIS, including beheadings, enslavement, amputations, stone-throwings, and torture, among other things. The Islamic State considers anybody who does not adhere to their extremist form of Islam to be an enemy. It may come as a surprise to many non-Muslims that Shia Muslims are ISIS’s prime targets, but they are. Generations of conflict have raged between Sunnis and Shias, and the development of ISIS is considered as the latest indication of this horrible sectarian division, among other things.

  • Preemptive Love Coalition photo by Jeremy Courtney.
  • Shabaks, Alawites, Jews, and Christians have all suffered immensely as a result of ISIS’s brutality and repressive regime.
  • ISIS, which refers to itself as “devil worshipers,” carried out a genocide against the Yazidi people, torturing and killing hundreds of males while seizing and subjecting women and girls to continuous rape, beatings, and enslavement in their detention camps.
  • In the meanwhile, Sinjar, the Yazidi homeland, and its surrounding territory are still under the hands of several armed organizations.
  • Check out the following statistics on how ISIS’s focused efforts against them have impacted them: pic.twitter.com/87z3WVE8Vj On April 5, 2019, Nadia’s Initiative (@nadiainitiative) tweeted: ” Using contemporary media to spread its message is another something ISIS is well-known for.
  • According to a July 2018 study, more than 40,000 foreigners from 110 countries have joined ISIS in Iraq and Syria, with 80 percent of them being males and the remaining 20 percent being women and children in proportion to their number.
  • These include a desire to help their religious brethren or a desire to exact vengeance against oppressive regimes, among other reasons.

What is a caliphate?

In 2017, Mosul, Iraq, was the scene of a terrorist attack. The image is courtesy of Ihsan Ibraheem/Preemptive Love Coalition A caliphate is a political-religious state composed of members of the Muslim community, as well as the people and areas that fall under its jurisdiction. Following the death of the Prophet Mohammed in 632 AD, the first caliphate was established. The caliph, who is both the religious and civil ruler of the caliphate, has absolute power over all of the caliphate’s subjects.

ISIS’s caliphate, which spanned Syria and Iraq, possessed many characteristics of a contemporary nation-state, including the ability to wage war.

  • Administration and services
  • Administrative government and services
  • A majority of a certain culture or religion Borders that are distinct

At the very least, ISIS proven to be effective in providing state-run services, just as the government had done before it took control. A caliphate, on the other hand, cannot exist without territory, because the caliph need physical limits within which to administer Islamic law. On a more practical level, territory enabled ISIS to amass vast fortune via the exploitation of a varied range of natural resources. The seven or eight million people who lived in the caliphate that ISIS established gave it with a significant amount of tax revenue and labor, allowing it to expand.

  • From agriculture to oil, ISIS had complete control over its resources.
  • In Syria, ISIS continued to lose land and strength until March 2019, when it was forced to abandon Baghouz, which was its final important bastion.
  • Governments are declaring triumph in the war on terror.
  • However, putting an end to the caliphate does not always entail putting an end to ISIS.
  • Losing the caliphate means losing this area and all of the wealth that its resources have created, therefore regaining territory that has been claimed is a real triumph for the Islamic State.

What happens to ISIS now?

ISIS’s strength has been eroded by five years of continuous combat, but the group has encountered similar challenges in the past. In 2010, when the United States withdrew from Iraq and left ISIS in shambles, with just a few hundred fighters remaining, Nonetheless, it reorganized and returned. In late 2017, as ISIS’s de-facto capital in Syria, Raqqa, fell to American-backed, Kurdish-led troops, there were echoes of the events of 2010. Then, in early 2018, there were echoes of the events of 2010.

However, it was hardly a humiliating defeat.

It’s still here, and it still has a lot of money in its bank account.

Conditions are still favorable for extremism and violence to flourish in the absence of enough resources to rebuild.

Even if this iteration of ISIS fails, it will adapt and reform under a different disguise, all with the same goal in mind: to establish a caliphate, revive what its adherents believe to be the golden age of Islam, and begin the countdown to the apocalypse, as described by the Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him).

According to ISIS, the responsibility of a good Muslim is to give his or her life in service to the caliphate, to prepare the earth for its last days, and to reap benefits in the hereafter for one’s dedication.

What happens to the children and wives of ISIS fighters now?

When the wives and children of ISIS militants began to flee the final vestige of the caliphate in early 2019, they were told they were not to interfere with the battle. But some stayed obstinate, refusing to go. Many people have stated their confidence that the caliphate would rise once again. They were able to make their way to a refugee camp in northern Syria, where the situation is dire. As the last assault on al-Hawl began, more than 40,000 people descended upon the city. With little preparation for the massive migration of women and children, there has been a catastrophic shortage of medical treatment and food, while supplies from humanitarian organizations have been delayed by a lack of security on the route.

You might be interested:  How Many People Practice Islam?

Due to tribal law’s stigmatization of extremist connections, families of ISIS combatants have been rejected by their communities, even if the family members themselves did not support the group.

Work, feeding, and childcare responsibilities are severely curtailed for these women.

The children are the ones who suffer the most as resources are pushed to their breaking point, as much of the world moves on from Iraq and Syria, and as community tensions continue to make already terrible situations much more difficult to deal with.

This generation of children, traumatized by war and the subsequent treatment they received from authorities, urgently requires programs to assist them in processing what they have been through, removing them from the ideologies that they were brainwashed with, and reintegrating them into the communities in which they must now live.

The education and care of children of ISIS combatants is critical to averting the outbreak of another war.

Community or caliphate?

The image is courtesy of Ihsan Ibraheem/Preemptive Love Coalition It’s difficult enough trying to reconstruct your life when war has destroyed all you own. It’s much more difficult when you’re a woman trying to care for your family and your alternatives are limited due to your gender stereotype. Alternatively, if you are a kid who has lost your family and home as a result of violence, you will grow up without the stability that is the foundation of a successful and happy life. For the children of ISIS militants, all of this is compounded by the social shame associated with being the child of parents who are seen as bad by their peers.

  1. Children grow up lonely and open to exploitation and radicalization because they lack the familial and social ties that characterize so much of life in the Middle East.
  2. In Iraq, a whole generation of children and teenagers has grown up knowing just one thing: war.
  3. For them, the fall of the caliphate is just another chapter in a cycle of bloodshed that is still going on unabated even as we speak.
  4. When you were 18 years old, you would have witnessed the Iraq-Iran War.
  5. Sanctions are in effect for 12 years.
  6. When you were 44 years old, you joined ISIS.
  7. You are deserving of the Nobel Prize.
  8. It’s because the job isn’t finished yet, and you’re fully aware of that fact.

Only after their houses have been rebuilt and peace has been restored will we be able to declare that evil has been overcome. We can help our brothers and sisters in Iraq and Syria rebuild if we all work together.

Help our brothers and sisters remake home—and prevent the next war from happening.

Preemptive Love Coalition photo by Ihsan Ibraheem. After a war has robbed you of everything, it’s difficult enough to try to reconstruct your life. If you are a woman attempting to provide for your family, it is much more difficult when your alternatives are restricted due to your gender. It’s also difficult to cope when you’re a youngster who has lost your family and your home as a result of violence, and you’re growing up without the stability that is the foundation of a happy and successful life.

  • Having a sense of belonging is really important in this area.
  • These are the precise conditions that aided in the establishment of ISIS.
  • They have never known what it’s like to live in peace with one another or with nature.
  • What if your birthday is December 12, 1962, and you were born in Iraq?
  • When I was 29, I was in the first Gulf War.
  • When you were 44 years old, you were recruited into ISIS.
  • The Nobel Prize should be awarded to you!
  • It’s because the job isn’t finished yet, and you’re fully aware of it.
  • That evil has been overcome will only be true when their houses have been rebuilt and peace has been restored.

Mass Violence and Genocide by the Islamic State/Daesh in Iraq and Syria

‘Sometimes it might seem like the only thing people is interested in when it comes to the genocide is the sexual exploitation of Yazidi females, and they just want to hear about a battle,’ says the author. It is my desire to speak about everything – the death of my siblings, the disappearance of my mother, the indoctrination of the guys – and not just about rape. A victim of the Yazidi massacre, Nadia Murad

Rise and Fall of the Islamic State

There are several names for Daesh/Islamic State (IS), the most common being Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL), Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS), or the Arabic acronym for the group, Daesh. Because of the evolution of their name, we can see the many stages in which the organization has progressed. The group’s origins can be traced back to 1999 under the name Jama’at al-Tawhid wa-al-Jihad (Organization of Monotheism and Jihad), which later evolved into al Qaeda in Iraq in 2004 under the leadership of Jordanian Abu Musab al-Zarqawi to become al Qaeda in Iraq.

  1. In June of 2014, the Islamic State formally proclaimed itself as a worldwide caliphate with Raqqa, Syria as its headquarters and designated Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi to be its caliph.
  2. A caliph is a Muslim political and religious leader who is widely considered as the Prophet Muhammad’s successor.
  3. Political officials, intellectuals, and Muslim leaders and academics have all questioned and disputed ISIS’s association with Islam and interpretation of Islam.
  4. After losing much of its territory in Iraq and Syria, ISIS was proclaimed destroyed in early 2019, and in October 2019, Abu Bakr al-Baghda was killed during a raid spearheaded by US forces.
  5. Fighting in Iraq and Syria has now become more difficult since ISIS members have become indistinguishable from the local populace.

They continue to carry out irregular strikes and remain a menace. They have also increased their worldwide reach, with affiliate organizations in a number of nations committing lethal strikes on their behalf. For additional information about the Islamic State, visit the following websites:

  • ISIS: Inside the Army of Terror- A look at the birth and fall of the Islamic State
  • The Involvement of the United States in the Rise of ISIS- On the role of the United States in the rise of ISIS Beyond Authenticity: ISIS and the Islamic Legal Tradition- An investigation on the relationship between ISIS and Islam

Genocide and Violence against Ethno-Religious Groups in Iraq

The Turkmen are one of Iraq’s major ethnic groups, with a population ranging from 500,000 to 2.5 million people. They are Muslims who follow both Sunni and Shia traditions. The Shabak, who are primarily Shia Muslims, number between 200,000 and 500,000 people, according to estimates from various sources. Despite the fact that they retain certain distinctive cultural and linguistic vestiges, the Shabak are ethnically descended from Kurds, Arabs, and Turkmen and as a result are difficult to discern as a separate ethnic group in their own right.

  1. When ISIS swept into the Iraqi cities of Mosul and Tal Afar in June 2014, they presented a threat to the religious groups that had settled in those cities.
  2. Several Shia assets, particularly Shia Shabak holdings, were denoted with the Arabic letter R.
  3. ISIS militants and local sympathizers were given control over Shia property, which was taken and redistributed.
  4. Following the capture of Sinjar, Tal Afar was used as a temporary holding facility for enslaved Yazidi women before being trafficked to other ISIS-controlled territories.

Assyrian, Chaldean, and Syriac Christians

In Iraq, the majority of Christians are Chaldean or Assyrian, and many of them trace their ancestors back to the Assyrian and Mesopotamian empires. They are not new to persecution and mass bloodshed, having previously been the subject of extermination by the Ottoman Empire during World War I, Arabization by Saddam Hussein’s Ba’athist dictatorship, and Kurdification by Kurds, to name a few examples. It was in 2010, during a raid on Our Lady of Salvation Church in Baghdad, when Islamic State of Iraq terrorists carried out one of the bloodiest massacres against Christians in Iraq.

Iraq’s Christian population has shrunk from 1.5 million to a maximum of 250,000 individuals since the 2003 US invasion, according to official figures.

ISIS denoted Christian residences with the Arabic letter ” N “, which stands for Nasrani, or Christian, and which swiftly became a global sign of solidarity with persecuted Christians across the world.

This resulted in a second wave of mass migration across the region.

Despite the fact that the Nineveh Plain has been reclaimed from ISIS, many Christians are hesitant and scared of returning, citing rising tensions between diverse ethnoreligious groups as a reason for their hesitation.

Yazidis

Yizkor is an ethnoreligious community that practices a religion that incorporates aspects of Christianity, Islam, Zoroastrianism, and Jewish traditions. Prior to 2014, they were mostly located in the northern Iraqi province of Sinjar, where they numbered roughly 600,000 people. It is widely believed that the events that unfolded in Sinjar were part of a long history of persecution and genocide against the Yazidi people. The Yazidis believe that this latest round of violence represents the 74th ferman, or genocide, against their people and their land.

  1. ISIS launched a devastating attack on and conquered the city of Sinjar.
  2. Hundreds of Yazidis perished as a result of dehydration, hunger, and suicide while stranded in the heat.
  3. ISIS, on the other hand, abducted women and girls to sell into sex slavery, forced young boys into ISIS training camps, and killed men and old people during this time period.
  4. Many mass graves have been discovered, and there are likely to be many more to be discovered.
  5. Almost 2,745 children have been left without parents.
  6. In addition, ISIS damaged Yazidi cultural sites in Bahzani, Bashiqa, and Sinjar, according to the United Nations.
  7. Since the massacre, Yazidis have been in the forefront of attempts to chronicle ISIS’s crime of genocide and to seek legal redress on an international scale.
  8. However, this is complicated by a lack of security, which is exacerbated further by the fact that the Nineveh Plains are disputed territory between the Iraqi and Kurdish administrations.

Other Victims of Violence

In addition to Turkmen, Shabak, Yazidis, and Christians, other ethnoreligious communities in Iraq, such as the Sabean-Mandeans and the Kaka’i, were targeted by ISIS, as were other ethnic and religious groups in Iraq. A lack of security and large-scale relocation, in reality, constitute a severe threat to the extinction of the Sabean-Mandeans and Kaka’i groups, which are already in danger of extinction. Additionally, ISIS targeted reporters and journalists, resulting in what has been dubbed a “news black hole” in the areas under their control, as well as LGBT men and women.

Because of the Syrian civil-proxy war, which involves ISIS and Bashar al Assad, the world is currently experiencing the biggest refugee crisis in modern history, with an estimated 13 million people requiring humanitarian aid, with approximately 6 million registered refugees from Syria alone.

For additional details on ISIS’s campaign of mass brutality and genocide, see:

  • Iraq: Bearing Witness, a report by the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum on violence against all religious groups in Iraq
  • Iraq: Bearing Witness, a report by the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum on violence against all religious groups in Iraq
  • Iraq: Bearing Witness, a report by the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum on violence The Last Girl: My Story of Captivity, and My Fight Against the Islamic State- A Memoir by Nadia Murad, a Yazidi survivor and the 2018 Nobel Peace Prize winner- is a memoir about her experiences as a captive of the Islamic State. The Last Plight- A short documentary on Assyrian Christians and Yazidis, as well as the situation that has erupted in Iraq with the loss of Mosul and the Nineveh Plains, is available online. It was a daring plan to save a religious minority from ISIS that brought diaspora Yazidis together with the United States State Department to assist Yazidis escape ISIS.

Labeling the Violence as Genocide

Christians, Yazidis, and other ethnic and religious minorities have been targeted by ISIS, according to a resolution voted unanimously by the European Parliament in February of this year. This was the first time in history that the Parliament declared a genocide while the actions were still taking place. Shortly after, the United States House of Representatives overwhelmingly passed a resolution recognizing that ISIS is committing genocide against Yazidis and Christians in northern Iraq. As part of the Iraq and Syria Genocide Relief and Accountability Act, which was approved in 2018, the United States offered over $300 million in relief to ethnic and religious minorities in Iraq and Syria.

You might be interested:  How Islam Started? (Solved)

Despite the fact that the classification of genocide was not entirely unexpected, it sparked a debate over the ramifications of the label.

In the case of ISIS, on the other hand, this is an unique occurrence in which a non-state group with no internationally recognized borders has been accused of committing genocide, and this might potentially bring new issues in the application of international law in this situation.

More material on the designation of ISIS’s actions as genocide may be found at:

  • In February 2016, the European Parliament overwhelmingly passed a resolution saying that ISIS has perpetrated genocide against Christians, Yazidis, and other ethnic and religious minorities in the Middle East. When the Parliament declared a genocide while the events were still unfolding, it was the first time the institution had done so. ISIS is committing genocide against Yazidis and Christians, and the United States House of Representatives overwhelmingly passed a resolution recognizing this fact. As part of the Iraq and Syria Genocide Relief and Accountability Act, which was approved in 2018, the United States committed almost $300 million in help to ethnic and religious minorities living in Iraq and Syria. The United Nations has concluded that solely the Yazidis are being targeted for genocide. Despite the fact that the classification of genocide was not entirely unexpected, it sparked a discussion regarding the consequences of the label. According to Rafael Lemkin, using the term genocide can “help to clarify our thought” and offer a more precise account of the events, which can then be used to drive the creation of a policy response in the case of genocide. In the case of ISIS, on the other hand, this is an unique occasion in which a non-state group with no internationally recognized borders has been accused of committing genocide, and this might potentially bring new issues in the application of international law in the future. In the course of these conversations, it became clear what the consequences and limitations of a legal genocide designation were. Please visit the following link for further information on the designation of ISIS atrocities as genocide.

What is ISIS? Key facts about the Islamic State

Christians, Yazidis, and other ethnic and religious minorities have been targeted by ISIS, according to a resolution passed unanimously by the European Parliament in February 2016. This was the first time in history that the Parliament declared a genocide while the events were still happening. ISIS is committing genocide against Yazidis and Christians, and the US House of Representatives unanimously passed a resolution acknowledging this. As part of the Iraq and Syria Genocide Relief and Accountability Act, which was passed in 2018, the United States committed nearly $300 million in aid to ethnic and religious minorities in Iraq and Syria.

The designation of genocide was not entirely unexpected, but it sparked a debate about the implications of such a designation.

In the case of ISIS, on the other hand, this is a rare instance in which a non-state entity with no internationally recognized borders has been accused of committing genocide, and this could potentially present new challenges in the application of international law.

In the course of these discussions, it became clear what the implications and limitations of a legal genocide designation are. For more information on the designation of ISIS’s violence as genocide, see:

What is the Islamic State fighting for?

The militants’ ultimate objective is to establish an ultra-conservative caliphate that tightly imposes Shariah, or Islamic law, throughout the world.

Who started and led the Islamic State?

Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, an Iraqi, is credited with founding ISIS. He was the leader of al Qaeda in Iraq when it was originally formed, and he was responsible for turning it into an effective and well-organized combat force. The group changed its name in April 2013, indicating that it now has a more expansive goal of creating a caliphate that encompasses all of Iraq and Syria. In June 2014, ISIS released a manifesto in which it claimed to be able to trace al-ancestry Baghdadi’s all the way back to the Prophet Muhammad.

That, on the other hand, has never been proven.

Authorities investigating the Paris terrorist attacks in November 2015, which murdered 130 people, have stated that al-Adnani was most likely the “greenlight” behind the assaults.

What role did women play in ISIS?

In spite of the fact that ISIS does not recruit women for military tasks, it does so to assist in the establishment of its caliphate, recruiting women from all across Muslim countries and Europe. The gang utilizes social media to spread the idea, offering women spouses who are ardent jihadis in exchange for their cooperation. Female brigades were stationed throughout the city’s former capital, Raqqa, to enforce the stringent interpretation of Shariah by ensuring that women dressed modestly and beating them with lashing if they did not comply with the law.

What was the U.S. response to ISIS?

Because of this, the United States has been leading a coalition of nations that has carried out airstrikes against ISIS and in support of Iraqi soldiers fighting the extremists since 2014. By the end of 2017, ISIS had lost a significant amount of territory in both Iraq and Syria, and Iraq proclaimed its war on the militant group finished in December 2017. Analysts, however, have cautioned that although ISIS’ self-declared caliphate is in ruins on the ground, the organization is withdrawing into what some refer to as a “virtual caliphate,” from which it will aim to incite additional lone wolf terror strikes in the West.

Topic: Islamic State (ISIS)

The Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, often known by its Arabic name Daesh, was founded in 1999 as Jama’at al-Tawhid wal-Jihad (Jamaism of Truth and Jihad). A former al-Qaeda affiliate, the organization gained to worldwide notoriety during the Syrian civil war and subsequent wars in Iraq during the early part of the decade of the 2010s. As of 2019, the terrorist operations of the group have resulted in more than 1,200 deaths throughout the world.

Where is ISIS most active?

Despite the fact that ISIS has claimed responsibility for actions outside of the Middle East, including as the November 2015 Paris killings, the Islamic State’s despotism has been mostly confined in Iraq, Syria, and Libya.

The number of terrorist attacks by nation reveals that Afghanistan, Syria, and India are the countries that have been the most severely affected by acts of terrorism around the world.

Opinion of Americans on undertaking military action against ISIS

Community members are terrified in countries where ISIS has a large presence, but this is not the case in all of them. Because of a series of assaults in the United States that have been attributed to ISIS, there is a growing desire among Americans for the government to take action against the danger. According to a 2014 study, 60 percent of American residents supported the United States’ military involvement in Iraq and Syria against the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria. Also in 2014, over 80 percent of the American populace considered that ISIS posed at least a significant danger to the vital interests of the United States, according to the Pew Research Center.

Source of funds

However, despite threats by then-candidate Donald Trump to cut off ISIS’s money streams by targeting oil installations in territory controlled by the organization, oil revenues accounted for less than one tenth of the organisation’s total revenue in 2014. As a result, extortion and taxes in Iraq, as well as monies taken from state-owned institutions, provided the overwhelming majority of ISIS’s revenue.

Opinion on ISIS in Muslim-majority countries

Clearly, animosity for the terrorist organization extends well beyond the borders of the country that the Islamic State considers to be the spearhead of a global campaign to crush Islam. Despite the fact that the group has endeavored to conduct an ideological battle in the name of Islam, the organization’s radical attitude has caused the majority of Muslims throughout the world to be skeptical of the group’s intentions and its possibilities of succeeding in their mission. More than three-quarters of respondents in a study of adolescents from seventeen Muslim-majority countries, including Iraq, said they felt ISIS would be unsuccessful in its aspirations to build an Islamic state.

Statista bears no responsibility for the accuracy or completeness of the information provided.

Key figures

A concise explanation of the issue of “Islamic State (ISIS)” is provided by the most essential key figures, which then link you directly to the related statistical data.

Other interesting statistics

The Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, often known by its Arabic name Daesh, was founded in 1999 as Jama’at al-Tawhid wal-Jihad (Jamaism of Truth and Jihad). A former al-Qaeda affiliate, the organization gained to worldwide notoriety during the Syrian civil war and subsequent wars in Iraq during the early part of the decade of the 2010s. As of 2019, the terrorist operations of the group have resulted in more than 1,200 deaths throughout the world.

Where is ISIS most active?

Despite the fact that ISIS has claimed responsibility for actions outside of the Middle East, including as the November 2015 Paris killings, the Islamic State’s despotism has been mostly confined in Iraq, Syria, and Libya.

The number of terrorist attacks by nation reveals that Afghanistan, Syria, and India are the countries that have been the most severely affected by acts of terrorism around the world.

Opinion of Americans on undertaking military action against ISIS

Community members are terrified in countries where ISIS has a large presence, but this is not the case in all of them. Because of a series of assaults in the United States that have been attributed to ISIS, there is a growing desire among Americans for the government to take action against the danger. According to a 2014 study, 60 percent of American residents supported the United States’ military involvement in Iraq and Syria against the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria. Also in 2014, over 80 percent of the American populace considered that ISIS posed at least a significant danger to the vital interests of the United States, according to the Pew Research Center.

Source of funds

However, despite threats by then-candidate Donald Trump to cut off ISIS’s money streams by targeting oil installations in territory controlled by the organization, oil revenues accounted for less than one tenth of the organisation’s total revenue in 2014. As a result, extortion and taxes in Iraq, as well as monies taken from state-owned institutions, provided the overwhelming majority of ISIS’s revenue.

Opinion on ISIS in Muslim-majority countries

Clearly, animosity for the terrorist organization extends well beyond the borders of the country that the Islamic State considers to be the spearhead of a global campaign to crush Islam. Despite the fact that the group has endeavored to conduct an ideological battle in the name of Islam, the organization’s radical attitude has caused the majority of Muslims throughout the world to be skeptical of the group’s intentions and its possibilities of succeeding in their mission. More than three-quarters of respondents in a study of adolescents from seventeen Muslim-majority countries, including Iraq, said they felt ISIS would be unsuccessful in its aspirations to build an Islamic state.

Statista bears no responsibility for the accuracy or completeness of the information provided.

Other interesting statistics

Clearly, anti-Islamic State sentiment extends beyond the borders of the country that the extremist organization considers to be the spearhead of a global crusade to crush Islam. Despite the fact that the group has endeavored to conduct an ideological battle in the name of Islam, the organization’s radical attitude has caused the majority of Muslims throughout the world to be skeptical of the group’s intentions and its possibilities of succeeding in their efforts. More than three-quarters of respondents in a study of adolescents from seventeen Muslim-majority countries, including Iraq, said they felt ISIS would be unsuccessful in its efforts to build an Islamic state.

Statista makes no representations or warranties as to the accuracy or completeness of the information it provides.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *