Where Was Islam Started? (Best solution)

Islam started in Mecca, in modern-day Saudi Arabia, during the time of the prophet Muhammad’s life.

Where did Islam start and where did it spread?

  • Islam originated in the city of Mecca, which is on the eastern side of the Arabian peninsula in modern-day Saudi Arabia. The Prophet of Islam, Muhammad, was a native of this city. As an adult, Muhammad took up the habit of praying alone in the caves near Mecca.

How was Islam started?

The start of Islam is marked in the year 610, following the first revelation to the prophet Muhammad at the age of 40. Muhammad and his followers spread the teachings of Islam throughout the Arabian peninsula. The angel recites to him the first revelations of the Quran and informs him that he is God’s prophet.

When did Islam really begin?

The history of Islam concerns the political, social, economic, and cultural developments of Islamic civilization. Most historians believe that Islam originated in Mecca and Medina at the start of the 7th century CE.

Who wrote the Quran?

The Prophet Muhammad disseminated the Koran in a piecemeal and gradual manner from AD610 to 632, the year in which he passed away. The evidence indicates that he recited the text and scribes wrote down what they heard.

Who founded Islam?

The rise of Islam is intrinsically linked with the Prophet Muhammad, believed by Muslims to be the last in a long line of prophets that includes Moses and Jesus.

Which religion came first in the world?

Hinduism is the world’s oldest religion, according to many scholars, with roots and customs dating back more than 4,000 years. Today, with about 900 million followers, Hinduism is the third-largest religion behind Christianity and Islam.

What is the oldest religion?

The word Hindu is an exonym, and while Hinduism has been called the oldest religion in the world, many practitioners refer to their religion as Sanātana Dharma (Sanskrit: सनातन धर्म, lit.

Who were the first Muslims?

Ali was the first Muslim convert. Ali ibn Abi Talib is considered the first Muslim convert. The early historian Ibn Ishaq and Tabari puts Ali Muhammad’s cousin and son-in-law as the first male convert; Muhammad ibn Jarir al-Tabari presents three candidates, and does not decide between them.

Which is older Quran or Bible?

The Bible is older than the Quran. The Quran was written by Muhammad in the 500 ADs. The Bible consists of books written centuries before. All of them were compiled into the Bible at a later time but the books themselves existed before the Quran.

Where is Allah located?

Given that Allah is just another name of Jewish God (Yahweh), Allah resides in the third heaven mentioned in the Bible. Note that this heaven is outside the creation of God.

Where is the original Quran kept?

The Topkapi manuscript is an early manuscript of the Quran dated to the early 8th century. It is kept in the Topkapi Palace Museum, Istanbul, Turkey.

Who built the Kaaba?

Some say that it was built by the angels. Others say the father of humankind, Adam built the Kaba but over many centuries it fell into disrepair and was lost in the mists of time, to be rebuilt by Prophet Abraham and his son Ishmael. All agree that the Kaba was either built or rebuilt by Prophet Abraham.

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Following the first revelation to the prophet Muhammad at the age of 40, the year 610 is commemorated as the beginning of Islamic history. Muslims all throughout the Arabian peninsula followed Muhammad and his companions in spreading the principles of Islam. Following the death of the prophet Muhammad, military expeditions were launched into what is now Egypt and other parts of North Africa, which were dubbed “futuhat,” which literally translates as “openings.” Islam expanded around the world through trade and business in various regions of the world.

In the year 570 C.E.

He is descended from a noble family and is well-known for his honesty and uprightness of moral character.

  • According to Muslim tradition, Muhammad has a visit from the angel Gabriel while on seclusion in a cave in Mecca when he reaches the age of 40.
  • Later, Muhammad is instructed to call his people to the worship of the one God, but they respond with hostility and begin to persecute him and his followers as a result of his actions.
  • After facing persecution in Mecca, Muhammad and his followers flee to the adjacent town of Yathrib (which would eventually become known as Medina), where the locals welcomed Islam.
  • Muhammad builds an Islamic kingdom in Medina, which is founded on the rules given in the Quran as well as the inspired direction he receives from the Almighty.
  • Muhammad comes to Mecca with a significant number of his supporters in the year 630 CE.
  • The prophet orders the removal of all idols and images from the Kaaba, which is thereafter rededicated to the worship of God alone.
  • after a lengthy illness.

In 638 C.E., Muslims cross the border into the region north of Arabia known as “Sham,” which encompasses Syria, Palestine, Lebanon, and Iraq.

and rout the Byzantine army in the process.

Islam begins to spread throughout North Africa in the year 655 C.E.

This also marks the beginning of the Umayyad dynasty’s reign of terror.

The Islamic state eventually gains control over nearly the whole Iberian Peninsula.

by Charles Martel’s forces.

From 1000 C.E.

The European Crusaders capture Jerusalem from the Muslims in 1099 C.E.

Islam continues to spread throughout Asia as of the year 1120 C.E.

Turkey’s Anatolia region becomes the site of the formation of the first Ottoman state in 1299 C.E.

Around the year 1800 C.E., over 30% of Africans who were forced into slavery in the United States were Muslim.

The Ottoman Empire, the last of the Islamic empires, is defeated and destroyed at the end of World War I, marking the end of the war.

Traditional religious ways of life are under attack, and in some cases, have been completely obliterated.

D.

Even while it is founded on some Islamic concepts, it also includes several innovations, like the designation or pronouncement of Elijah Muhammad as a prophet.

Some Palestinian and Lebanese refugees, including Muslims and Christians, have fled to the United States from their home countries.

Muslim students come from all over the world to study in the United States.

opened the door even wider for Muslim immigration.

Muhammad, the son of Elijah Muhammad, takes over as leader of the Nation of Islam and successfully integrates the majority of his followers into mainstream Islam.

C.E. 1979 was a year of transition. Eventually, the Iranian Revolution leads to Iran becoming known as the Islamic Republic of Iran, which is the first attempt at an Islamic state in the modern era.

When Did Islam Begin?

A long and complicated history has been woven into the fabric of Islam. The history of Islam is vital for Muslims to understand, which is why we’ve put together this essay, which covers the very origins of Islam and how the religion was spread around the world by Prophets who shared the teachings of Allah (SWT).

When Was Islam Founded?

When did Islam begin? is one of the most often asked questions concerning the religion’s history. Its beginnings may be traced back to 610 A.D., when the Prophet Muhammad (PBUH) first encountered the Angel Jibril and was inspired to communicate the teachings of Allah with the world (SWT).

Prophet Muhammad (PBUH)

Prophet Muhammad (PBUH) was born in the Arabian city of Mecca in the year 570 A.D. His parents were Abdullah ibn Abd al-Muttalib and Amina bint Wahb, and he was born in the city of Muttalib. He had a total of 13 wives, two of them gave birth to children for him. Prophet Muhammad (PBUH) is regarded to be the last of the 25 prophets who were chosen by Allah (SWT) to transmit His teachings throughout the world. Muhammad (PBUH) and his first wife, Khadija, lived in Mecca during the year 610 A.D., which was under the control of the Quraysh.

  1. The city was in command of key commercial routes that ran from Arabia to Syria and Yemen, among other places.
  2. In an attempt to get clarity after hearing voices and seeing visions, Muhammad (PBUH) frequented a cave on Mount Hira to meditate in an effort to gain clarity.
  3. Even though Muhammad’s (PBUH) background included being a trader who was unable to read or write, the Angel Jibril directed him to memorize the words of Allah (SWT).
  4. Following the incident, he confessed in his wife, who stood by him and supported him wholeheartedly.
  5. Although some scholars dispute this, others say that it might have occurred on any of the odd-numbered nights of the last 10 days of Ramadan, if not all of them.

He began to share some of the teachings he was receiving and gained a small following, but Arabia was still predominantly polytheistic at the time, and many people became enraged at Muhammad (PBUH), believing that pagan gods protected their trade and were fearful of what might happen to their livelihoods if they accepted Muhammad’s (PBUH) monotheistic teachings.

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Hegira

However, when his wife died in 619 A.D., and his uncle, Banu Hashim clan leader Abu Talib, died the next year (the year of mourning), he became exposed to assaults, despite the fact that many people did not agree with Muhammad (PBUH). He and his disciples were subjected to physical attacks, and as a result, they had no choice but to relocate to the city of Medina. Hegira is the name of the movement, which took place in 622 A.D. Prophet Muhammad (PBUH) was summoned to Medina by city officials in an attempt to heal the divisions that existed between different tribes residing in Medina, namely those belonging to the Arab and Jewish communities.

For his adjudication responsibilities, Muhammad (PBUH) and his followers were granted the ability to practice their faith while also being safeguarded by the government.

Return to Mecca

Muhammad (PBUH) returned to Mecca in 628 A.D. after a three-year absence. In the course of his journey, he was stopped by the Quraysh, who ultimately agreed to a peace known as the Hudaybiyah treaty. Because the Quraysh recognized and revered Muhammad (PBUH) and the religion of Islam, they decided that adherents of Islam would not experience persecution and would be treated on an equal footing with other citizens of the community.

The Evolution of Islam

In the years leading up to his death in 632 A.D., Muhammad (PBUH) continued to receive visits from the Angel Jibril, who brought him new lessons from Allah (SWT). There are five fundamental practices that underpin the Islamic religion, and they are as follows:

  • Shahada — the act of publicly professing your loyalty to and believe in Allah (SWT) and the Prophet Muhammad (PBUH). Salat is the act of praying five times a day, seven days a week. Zakat is the act of donating to a charitable cause. In Islam, sawm is the practice of fasting throughout the holy month of Ramadan. It is obligatory to make at least one pilgrimage to Mecca, which is known as Hajj.

Currently, there are several diverse sects within the religion of Islam, each of which adheres to a different school of thought. However, all of them are founded on the five foundations established by Prophet Muhammad (PBUH) and the teachings he and the other twenty-four prophets shared.

Islam Now

Islam has increased in popularity since its founding in 610 A.D., and it is today the second most prevalent religion in the world. Muslims may be found in every corner of the world, and they are well appreciated by people of all religions and cultural backgrounds.

Islam

Muslims believe that the Prophet Muhammad in Arabia in the 7th century CE propagated Islam, which is a prominent international religion. The Arabic termislam, which literally translates as “submission,” illustrates the essential theological notion of Islam: that the believer (also known as a Muslim, from the active component ofislam) accepts surrender to the will ofAllah (in Arabic, Allah is translated as “God”). According to Islam, Allah is the one God, who is the creator, sustainer, and restorer of the universe.

  • In Islam, Muhammad is regarded as the final prophet in a line of prophets that includes Adam, Noah, Abraham, Moses, Solomon, and Jesus, and his teaching both summarizes and completes the “revelations” credited to preceding prophets, according to Islamic tradition.
  • By the beginning of the twenty-first century, there were more than 1.5 billion Muslims in the globe.
  • Britannica QuizIslam What is your level of knowledge about the Prophet Muhammad?
  • With this quiz, you may see how well you know about Islam.

The essential ideas and practices of Islam, as well as the relationship between religion and society in the Islamic world, are discussed in the article Islamic world. The history of the numerous peoples who have adopted Islam is also discussed in the article Islamic world.

The foundations of Islam

When Islam was first introduced to the world, Muhammad instilled in his followers an understanding of brotherhood as well as a shared commitment to their faith. These qualities contributed to the development among his followers of a strong sense of closeness that was heightened by their experiences of persecution as a fledgling community in Mecca. It was only through a deep devotion to the teachings of the Qur’anic revelation and the evident socioeconomic substance of Islamic religious activities that this bond of faith could be strengthened.

The religion of Islam developed its distinctive ethos during this early period, as a religion that encompassed both the spiritual and temporal aspects of life, and that sought to regulate not only the individual’s relationship with God (through conscience), but also human relationships in a social setting.

Select Muslim intellectuals did not differentiate between the religious (private) and the secular (public) until the twentieth century, and only in some countries, such as Turkey, was the distinction formalized.

This dual religious and social character of Islam, which manifests itself in one way as a religious community commissioned by God to bring its own value system to the world through theji After the Prophet’s death in 632ce, they had placed a huge portion of the world under the control of a new ArabMuslim empire, stretching from Spain to Central Asia and India.

  • Islam’s fundamental equality within the community of the faithful, as well as its explicit discrimination against adherents of other religions, attracted a large number of recruits quickly.
  • They were, however, obligated to pay a per capita tax known as jizyah, as contrast to pagans, who were forced to either adopt Islam or die as a result of their refusal.
  • During the period after the 12th century, the Sufis (Muslim mystics) were largely responsible for the spread of Islam in India, Central Asia, Turkey, and sub-Saharan Africa, as well as other parts of the world (see below).
  • Islam was brought to Indonesia in the 14th century, but it had little time to establish a political foothold in the country before the region fell under the control of the Dutch.
  • All elements of Muslim society, on the other hand, are united by a shared religious belief and a sense of belonging to a single community of believers.

In the mid-20th century, the religion of Islam aided many Muslim peoples across their quest for political independence, and the oneness of Islam led to subsequent political solidarity in the world.

Sources of Islamic doctrinal and social views

In Islamic theology, law, and thinking in general, four sources, or essential principles (ul), are relied upon: (1) the Qur’an, (2) the Sunnah (or “Traditions”), (3) the Ijma (or “consensus”), and (4) the Ijtihd (or “individual thought”). Known as the Qur’an (literally, “reading” or “recitation”), it is said to be the verbatimword, or speech, of God, as given to Muhammad by the archangel Gabriel. It is the most important source of Islamic doctrine since it is divided into 114 suras (chapters) of varying length.

  1. The suras revealed at Medina at a later stage in the Prophet’s life are primarily concerned with social law and the political-moral principles that should guide the formation and organization of the community.
  2. Photograph by Orhan Am/Fotolia Pre-Islamic Arabs used the term sunnah (which means “a well-trodden road”) to refer to their tribe or common law systems.
  3. Six of these compilations, which were collected in the 3rd centuryah (9th centuryce), came to be considered as particularly authoritative by the Sunnis, who constitute the majority of Islam’s population.
  4. To unify legal theory and practice, as well as to remove individual and regional variations of opinion, the doctrine ofijm, also known as orconsensus, was established in the 2nd centuryah (eighth centuryce).
  5. The concept of Ahijm has existed since the 3rd century and has come to represent a principle of stability in thought; topics on which consensus had been established in practice were deemed closed, and any further meaningful questioning of them was forbidden.

Finding the legal or doctrinal answer to a new situation necessitated the use of the word ijtihd, which means “to endeavor” or “to exert effort.” During the early period of Islamic history, becauseijtihd took the form of individual opinion (ray), there was an abundance of contradictory and chaotic viewpoints to choose from.

While the “gate ofijtihd” in Sunni Islam was effectively closed by the turning of Ijm into a conservative mechanism and the adoption of a final collection of Hadith, the “gate ofijtihd” remained open in Shi’ism.

The Qur’an and Hadith are studied in further detail below. It will be addressed below in the frameworks of Islamictheology, philosophy, and law what the importance of Ijm and Ijtih is.

HISTORY OF ISLAM

Islam:7th century
In the 7th century Arabia becomes the cradle of the world’s third great monotheistic religion. All three have begun within a small area of southwest Asia. FirstJudaism, somewhere in the region stretching up from the Red Sea to Palestine; thenChristianityat the northern end of this area; and finally Islam to the south, in Mecca, close to the Red Sea.Each of the later arrivals in this close family of religions claims to build upon the message of its predecessors, bringing a better and more up-to-date version of the truth about the one God – in this case as revealed to the Messenger of God, Muhammad. Islam means ‘surrender’ (to God), and from the same root anyone who follows Islam is a Muslim.
It is on Mount Hira, according to tradition, that the archangel Gabriel appears to Muhammad. He describes later how he seemed to be grasped by the throat by a luminous being, who commanded him to repeat the words of God. On other occasions Muhammad often has similar experiences (though there are barren times, and periods of self doubt, when he is sustained only by his wifeKhadija ‘s unswerving faith in him).From about 613 Muhammad preaches inMeccathe message which he has received.
Muhammad’s message is essentially the existence of one God, all-powerful but also merciful, and he freely acknowledges that other prophets – in particular Abraham, Moses and Jesus – have preached the same truth in the past.But monotheism is not a popular creed with those whose livelihood depends on idols. Muhammad, once he begins to win converts to the new creed, makes enemies among the traders of Mecca. In 622 there is a plot to assassinate him. He escapes to the town of Yathrib, about 300 kilometres to the north.
Muhammad and the Muslim era:from622
The people of Yathrib, a prosperous oasis, welcome Muhammad and his followers. As a result, the move from Mecca in 622 comes to seem the beginning of Islam.The Muslim era dates from the Hegira – Arabic for’emigration’, meaning Muhammad’s departure from Mecca. In the Muslimcalendarthis event marks the beginning of year 1.
Yathrib is renamed Madinat al Nabi, the ‘city of the prophet’, and thus becomes known as Medina. Here Muhammad steadily acquires a stronger following. He is now essentially a religious, political and even military leader rather than a merchant (Khadijahas died in 619).He continues to preach and recite the words which God reveals to him. It is these passages, together with the earlier revelations at Mecca, which are written down in theArabic scriptby his followers and are collected to become the Qur’an – a word (often transliterated as Koran) with its roots in the idea of ‘recital’, reflecting the oral origin of the text. The final and definitive text of the Qur’an is established under the third caliph, Othman, in about 650.
The Muslims and Mecca: 624-630
Relations with Mecca deteriorate to the point of pitched battles between the two sides, with Muhammad leading his troops in the field. But in the end it is his diplomacy which wins the day.He persuades the Meccans to allow his followers back into the city, in 629, to make a pilgrimage to the Ka’ba and the Black Stone.
On this first Muslim pilgrimage to Mecca, Muhammad’s followers impress the local citizens both by their show of strength and by their self-control, departing peacefully after the agreed three days. But the following year the Meccans break a truce, provoking the Muslims to march on the city.They take Mecca almost without resistance. The inhabitants accept Islam. And Muhammad sweeps the idols out of theKa’ba, leaving only the sacred Black Stone.
An important element in Mecca’s peaceful acceptance of the change has been Muhammad’s promise that pilgrimage to the Ka’ba will remain a central feature of the new religion.So Mecca becomes, as it has remained ever since, the holy city of Islam. But Medina is by now where Muhammad and his most trusted followers live. And for the next few decades Medina will be the political centre of the developing Muslim state.
Muhammad lives only two years after the peaceful reconciliation with Mecca. He has no son. His only surviving children are daughters by Khadija, though since her death he has married several younger women, among whom his favourite is A’isha.
Muhammad and the caliphate:from632-656
There is no clear successor to Muhammad among his followers. The likely candidates include Abu Bakr (the father of Muhammad’s wifeA’isha) andAli(a cousin of Muhammad and the husband of Muhammad’s daughter Fatima). Abu Bakr is elected, and takes the title ‘khalifat rasul-Allah’.The Arabic phrase means ‘successor of the Messenger of God’. It will introduce a new word, caliph, to the other languages of the world.
Abu Bakr, the first caliph, lives no more than two years after the death of Muhammad. Even so, within this brief time Muslim armies have begun their astonishing expansion, subduing the whole of Arabia and striking as far north as Palestine.Abu Bakr is succeeded in 634 by Omar (another father-in-law of Muhammad), who in 638 capturesJerusalem. Six years later Omar is stabbed and killed in the mosque at Medina – for personal reasons, it seems, by a Persian craftsman living in Kufa.
Othman, chosen as the third caliph, is a son-in-law of Muhammad. By the end of his reign, in 656, Arabs have conquered as far afield as north Africa, Turkey and Afghanistan.Othman, like his predecessor, is assassinated -but this time by rebellious Muslims. They chooseali, another son-in-law of Muhammad, as the fourth caliph. For the first time within the Muslim community the selected caliph is the choice of just one faction. Ali’s caliphate eventually provokes the only major sectarian split in the history of Islam, betweenSunni and Shi’a(seeThe Shi’as).
Ali: 656-661
Raised to the position of caliph by rebels, Ali spends most of his reign in conflict with other Muslims. He wins the first battle, near Basra in 656, against an army fighting in support of Muhammad’s widow,A’isha. She is herself in the fray, riding a camel, with the result that the event is remembered as the ‘battle of the camel’.But it is Ali’s last success. The governor of Syria, Mu’awiya, wages a prolonged campaign against him to avenge the murder of the caliphOthman, his kinsman. Other opponents succeed in assassinating Ali, in 661, outside the mosque in Kufa – a Muslim garrison town to which he has moved the capital fromMedina.
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Muhammad and the Faith of Islam [ushistory.org]

University of Southern California’s Muslim Students Association provided the image. In this passage from the Qur’an, which was originally written in Arabic, “Muhammad is the Messenger of Allah” is translated. According to the Qur’an (48:29), A religious vision was revealed to a guy who was meditating alone in a cave near Mecca. This vision set the groundwork for the establishment of a new religion. Muhammad was born in the year 610, and he was a man of many names. Islamic thought evolved from Muhammad’s thoughts, and the belief system that resulted from these concepts is now the foundation for Islam, which is one of the most commonly practiced religions in the world.

  1. Both of Muhammad’s parents died when he was six years old, and he was raised by his grandpa and uncle after that.
  2. A Bedouin family welcomed him into their home throughout his boyhood, as per the customs of rich families.
  3. Muhammad’s encounters with these persons are highly likely to have had a significant impact on the formation of Islamic thought.
  4. Over the following 20 years, he rose from obscurity to become a wealthy and well-respected trader who traveled across the Arab world.
  5. By the time he was 40 years old, he began receiving religious visions that would forever alter the course of his life.

A Revelation of Faith

Muhammad received a revelation while meditating in a cave on the mountain of Hira. Eventually, Muhammad came to think that he had been chosen by God to serve as a prophet and teacher of a new religion, Islam, which literally translates as “submission.” The elements of Judaism and Christianity were merged into this new religion. Religions’ sacred texts, as well as their famous prophets and leaders – Abraham, Moses and Jesus, among others — were held in high regard. Muhammad addressed Abraham as “Khalil,” which means “God’s companion,” and designated him as the ancient patriarch of Islam.

Muhammad thought that he was God’s ultimate prophet and that he himself was the final prophet.

  • There is just one worldwide God, and his name is Allah. Muslims are obliged to pray five times a day with their backs to Mecca, according to Islamic tradition. All Muslims are required to pay an annual tax, which is mostly used to assist the poor and needy. Muslims are prohibited from eating, smoking, drinking, or engaging in sexual intercourse from sunrise to sunset during the whole month of Ramadan. All capable Muslims are required to do the Hajj (Pilgrimage to Mecca) at least once in their lives.

The Kaaba

The Kaaba, Islam’s holiest location, is located in Mecca and is believed to have been erected by Abraham and his son Ishmael for the worship of Yahweh. Islam grew at a breakneck pace, engulfing most of what was formerly the ancient Near East, North Africa, and Spain, and eventually enveloping the whole world. The impoverished and slaves, in particular, responded favorably to Muhammad’s message.

However, his message was met with strong opposition from many quarters. As a result of the pushback, he appeared to become even more determined. As a result of years of openly pushing his opinions, he grew to be despised to the point that some began plotting his death.

From Mecca to Medina and Back

Muhammad escaped to the town of Medina in 622 because he was afraid for his life. The Hegira, which is Arabic for “flight,” was the name given to this voyage from Mecca to Medina. This year marks the beginning of the Muslim calendar. When Muhammad and his entourage arrived in Medina, the locals greeted them warmly. Muhammad established the first mosque, also known as the Islamic temple, at Mecca and began the process of separating Islam from the religions of Judaism and Christianity, which had first inspired him.

Allah’s revelations to Muhammad lasted throughout his life.

During his time in Mecca, Muhammad was involved in a number of fights with the locals.

Before his death two years later, he had forced the conversion of the majority of the Arabian Peninsula to his new faith and established a tiny kingdom on the peninsula’s southern tip.

Jihad

Many Islamic sects have a belief in jihad, which is a common thread running through them. Despite the fact that the actual meaning of the Arabic word is difficult to convey in English, the word jihad is most appropriately translated as “fight.” For the vast majority of Muslims, jihad is a personal battle against evil. The sacred wars of this spiritual conflict are fought within the minds and hearts of Muslims. Sometimes the fight takes the shape of a physical battle against those who do not believe in God.

  1. A small but vocal minority of Muslims, on the other hand, places a high value on holy war jihads.
  2. It is this idea of jihad that serves as an inspiration for Islamic extremist terrorist activity.
  3. It should be emphasized that mainstream Islam is a peaceful religion that opposes the concept of unjustified violence.
  4. The unfortunate thing is that Muhammad had not named a successor.

Despite these difficulties, a huge Islamic empire was established over the course of the following 12 centuries, resulting in a worshiper base that was unsurpassed by any other religion.

Islam Fast Facts

(CNN) Take a look at Islam for a moment. Islam is translated as “submission” or “surrender” in several languages. Surrender to Allah’s will – Allah is the Arabic word meaning God.

Beliefs/Practices

Islam is influenced by the Judeo-Christian religions to some extent. Although it preaches a monotheistic message (belief that there is only one God), it adheres to many of the same ideas as Christianity and Judaism. Followers of Islam, known as Muslims, believe in a single God named Allah and acknowledge Muhammad as his prophet. They also think that Adam, from the Old Testament of the Bible, was the first prophet. Abraham, Moses, Noah, David, and Jesus are some of the other prophets that lived throughout this time period.

  1. – The Salat, also known as the Salah, is a daily religious ceremonial prayer performed five times a day.
  2. In the month of Ramadan, a Sawm is a fast that is observed.
  3. The pilgrimage begins on the seventh or eighth day of the final month of the Islamic lunar calendar and concludes on the 12th day of the same month, depending on when you start.
  4. For Muslims, it is the holiest spot in the planet.
  5. Muslims believe that the Quran contains divine words or revelations that serve as the foundation of their faith.
  6. The Quran contains a total of 114 chapters.
  7. A Jihad, according to Islamic traditions, is a fight that is waged while adhering to God’s mandates on a personal level as well as on a communal one.
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Muslim Denominations

Sunni Islam is the biggest branch of Islam and is also the most populous. They acknowledge that Muhammad’s first four caliphs (leaders) are the genuine heirs to Muhammad’s position. Sheikh Mohamed bin Abdulawahab founded the Wahabi sect in Saudi Arabia, which is made of members of the Tameem tribe who adhere to the stringent orthodox teachings of Sheikh Mohamed bin Abdulawahab. The Shiite (or Shia) sect of Islam, the second-largest branch of Islam, believes that only the caliph Ali and his descendants are the genuine heirs to Muhammad, and rejects the first three caliphs as unfit for office.

Furthermore, they observe a number of Christian and Zoroastrian holidays in addition to Islamic holidays.

They were well-known for their uncompromising opinions on the Quran’s adherence as well as for their extremist fundamentalist views.

The Nation of Islam is a predominantly African-American religious organization that was formed in Detroit, Michigan, in the 1930s. It is a Sunni sect, as the name suggests. Other Sunni and Shiite sects exist in African and Arab countries, as well as in other parts of the world.

Sharia Law

In its original meaning, Sharia is an Arabic term that translates as “the route leading to the fountain of water.” The Quran and the life of the Prophet Muhammad and his companions serve as sources for this work. Religious belief, religious observance, ethics, and politics are all part of a larger system of morality that encompasses both religious and non-religious parts of life. Many Muslim countries base their laws on Sharia law, which is a kind of Islamic law. Differences between Islamic law and Western legal systems include that the scope of Sharia law is far greater and that the Islamic notion of law is derived from the expression of divine will.

Other Facts

Pew Research Center estimates that there were 1.8 billion Muslims in the globe in 2015, according to their research. As predicted by the United Nations, this number will rise to 2.9 billion by 2060. Indonesia has the biggest proportion of adherents to the Islamic faith, accounting for 12.6% of the population. Pakistan, India, and Bangladesh are all countries with significant Muslim populations.

Timeline

Muhammad is born in Mecca, Arabia, in the year 570 AD (now Saudi Arabia). 610 AD – Muhammad has a visit from the Angel Gabriel, who informs him that “you are the messenger of God.” A 22-year period culminates in Muhammad’s death in Mecca and Medina, after which he distributes the lessons given to him throughout the world. Muhammad passes away in 632 AD. Muslims are separated into two factions, the Shiite and the Sunni, in 645 AD, due to a disagreement about the future leadership of the religion.

657 AD – The Shiite Muslims are further divided as a part of its adherents secede and form a third faction known as the Kharijites.

BBC – Religions – Islam: Early rise of Islam (632-700)

It is during the years of 650 and 652 AD that the Quran is completed, which contains all of Muhammad’s revelations/teachings. When a fraction of its adherents split away and form a third faction, the Kharijites, in 657 AD, the Shiite Muslims are further divided.

The history problem

It is possible to find many accounts from this time period about the early Muslim conquests, but much of the material is unreliable and written in a way that glorifies the victors and their god. Although they provide some insight into the big events of the seventh century, they are just incomplete explanations. However, this is not to say that the Muslims were not courageous or that their conviction that they were carrying out Allah’s will was not significant: it was unquestionably. However, their opponents possessed strong ideological convictions as well, and there is no reason to believe that individuals would be any less courageous as a result.

Hugh Kennedy’s 2001 book, The Armies of the Caliphs: Military and Society in the Early Islamic State, is a good example of this.

Conversion by conquest?

Although it is impossible to determine if Islam was the driving force behind Muslim military development, one new book shows that Islam undoubtedly aided the rise of Muslim power.only one viable explanation exists for Arab success—and that is the spirit of Islam. The generous terms that the invading armies frequently offered enabled their faith to be accepted by the conquered populations. Moreover, even though it was a young and upstart religion, its administration by simple and honest individuals was better to the corruption and persecution that were the norm in more sophisticated civilizations at the time.

  • Nafziger and Mark W.
  • And Islam reaped enormous benefits from the improbable military victories of the troops of Arabian Arabia.
  • Simply said, Islam may have accelerated the conquests, but it also shown far more long-term viability.
  • Islam at War: A History, edited by George F.
  • Walton, published in 2003.
  • Following the Ridda wars and the Arabs’ quick conquest of the majority of the Near East, the new religion was more clearly characterized as a monotheistic religion for the Arab people than it had been previously.

As is generally known, the Arabs made no attempt to force their religion on their new subjects, and in fact actively discouraged non-Arabs from converting to Islam at first. The Formation of Islam: Religion and Society in the Near East, 600-1800, by Jonathan P. Berkey, published in 2003.

The justification of conquest

Whether Islam was the driving force behind early Muslim imperialism or not, it could be used to offer justification for it in the same way that it had previously been used to defend Muhammad’s own actions against his adversaries. The Qur’an contains a number of passages that support military action against non-Muslims, such as:But when the forbidden months have passed, fight and slay the Pagans wherever ye find them, and seize them, beleaguer them, and lie in wait for them in every stratagem; but when the forbidden months have passed, fight and slay the Pagans wherever ye find them, and seize them, beleaguer them, and lie in wait for them (of war).

Qur’an 9:5 (from the Qur’an) You must fight all of those who deny the existence of Allah and the Last Day, as well as those who adhere to that which has been forbidden by Allah and His Messenger, and who refuse to recognize the religion of Truth (even though they are) of the People of the Book.

Considering that the armies of those days were not like contemporary armies – rather, they were more like an association of tribal mercenary groups that received no compensation and received their sole material benefit from the spoils of war – this is hardly unexpected.

After Muhammad’s death

When Islam was elevated to a political stature and given the function of both a political and a religious force by Muhammad, the military conquests served to solidify this position. For a caliph like Umar, it appears that he considered himself first and foremost as the leader of the Arabs, and that their monotheistic religion served as the religious component of their new political identities. The Formation of Islam: Religion and Society in the Near East, 600-1800, by Jonathan P. Berkey, published in 2003.

The conquest of Arabia

Following Muhammad’s death in 632 CE, the new Muslim commonwealth began to experience difficulties. Some tribes came to the conclusion that, because their commitment to Islam had been largely to Muhammad himself, Muhammad’s death gave them the opportunity to renounce their allegiance to Mecca and to Islam. Furthermore, the Prophet had not given clear instructions as to who would be in charge of the community following his death, which made matters much more complicated. Fortunately, the community picked Abu Bakr, the Prophet’s close associate and father-in-law, to be his successor very soon after his death.

Abu Bakr took rapid military action against the villages that were attempting to secede from the government.

Expansion in the Middle East

The caliph Abu Bakr died in 634, and his successor was Umar ibn al-Khattab, the second caliph, who governed until his death in 644. After becoming the ruler of a vast, cohesive kingdom with a well-organized army, Umar utilized this position as a vehicle to advance Islam’s expansion throughout the Middle East and North Africa. Umar’s first operations were against the Byzantine Empire, which he defeated. Following the crucial Battle of Yarmouk in 636, the Muslim troops seized the erstwhile Byzantine realms of Syria, Palestine, and Lebanon, bringing them under their control.

It was made considerably simpler by the weakness of the Sassanid Empire, which had been devastated by internal disputes and a protracted battle with the Byzantine Empire when this conquest took place.

It was only a few years later that Muslim armies had already captured portions of Egypt to the south, as well as Anatolia and Armenia to the north.

Is proselytism still appropriate?

In order to see this content, you must have Javascript enabled as well as Flash installed on your computer. For complete instructions, go to BBC Webwise. In this debate, Christians and Muslims compare and contrast their respective histories of mission, conversion, and religious growth around the world. Is there a religion that has a monopoly on the truth?

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