Which Religion Is Right Christianity Or Islam? (Best solution)

What do Christianity and Islam have in common?

  • Christianity and Islam have more in common than most people know — they are both monotheistic Abrahamic religions, and Jesus Christ is an important, revered figure in both religions. Followers of Christianity — called Christians — believe in the Holy Trinity, and that Christ, the son of God,

Which religion is the correct one?

Originally Answered: Which religion is correct? Islam is the truth. It is the only correct religion.

Which religion comes first Christianity or Islam?

Christianity developed out of Second Temple Judaism in the 1st century CE. It is founded on the life, teachings, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ, and those who follow it are called Christians. Islam developed in the 7th century CE.

Which religion is best in the world?

The most popular religion is Christianity, followed by an estimated 2.38 billion people worldwide. Islam, which is practiced by more than 1.91 billion people, is second. However, population researchers predict that Islam will have nearly caught up to Christianity by 2050.

Who wrote Bible?

For thousands of years, the prophet Moses was regarded as the sole author of the first five books of the Bible, known as the Pentateuch.

Which religion is closest to science?

Buddhism and science have been regarded as compatible by numerous authors. Some philosophic and psychological teachings found in Buddhism share points in common with modern Western scientific and philosophic thought.

Who is Allah in the Bible?

Allah, Arabic Allāh ( “God” ), the one and only God in Islam. Etymologically, the name Allah is probably a contraction of the Arabic al-Ilāh, “the God.” The name’s origin can be traced to the earliest Semitic writings in which the word for god was il, el, or eloah, the latter two used in the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament).

Which is older Quran or Bible?

The Bible is older than the Quran. The Quran was written by Muhammad in the 500 ADs. The Bible consists of books written centuries before. All of them were compiled into the Bible at a later time but the books themselves existed before the Quran.

Who wrote the Quran?

The Prophet Muhammad disseminated the Koran in a piecemeal and gradual manner from AD610 to 632, the year in which he passed away. The evidence indicates that he recited the text and scribes wrote down what they heard.

Why is Islam the most beautiful religion?

Islam is a beautiful religion which talks about equality, about peace and compassion. Most of the Islamic texts are written in Persian, which is an extremely rich language, the ground for some of finest and deepest prose and poetry, literature which has a profound impact on the being.

How long will Islam last?

In more than 15 ahadith found in the Sahih of Imam Bukhari, Sunnan of Imam Abu Dawwud, Jamii of Imam Tirmidhi and others, the prophet (saws) said Islam has a specific lifespan on earth, these Ahadith state Allah gave Islam 1500 years then relatively soon after this He would establish the Hour, we are now in the year

Will Islam become the largest religion in the world?

By 2030 Muslims are projected to represent about 26.4% of the global population (out of a total of 7.9 billion people). Islam is expected to be the world’s largest religion by the year 2075.

Who is the founder of Islam?

The rise of Islam is intrinsically linked with the Prophet Muhammad, believed by Muslims to be the last in a long line of prophets that includes Moses and Jesus.

Which country has the most Muslims?

The largest Muslim population in a country is in Indonesia, a country home to 12.7% of the world’s Muslims, followed by Pakistan (11.1%), India (10.9%) and Bangladesh (9.2%). About 20% of Muslims live in the Arab world.

Why Christianity Rather Than Judaism or Islam?

Dr. William Lane Craig, our Research Professor in Philosophy, writes a weekly QA blog article, which you can see here. Question Greetings, Dr. Craig. I’ve always been a little perplexed by your assertion that Christianity is the only real religion (based on historical evidence as you say). Nevertheless, how can you be so certain when both Islamic and Jewish scholars make the same claim? As a former atheist who has since converted to agnosticism, the question of which religion to follow is critical.

Muslim doctrine states that all people worship the same deity (“Allah” is not a special god for Muslims; rather, it is the Arabic word for god).

So, what exactly is your stance on Islam?

Thank you very much.

  1. William Lane Craig’s (Dr.
  2. Judaism, Christianity, and Islam are the world’s three largest monotheistic religions, all of which are genetically related and hence share much in common.
  3. I believe that neither Judaism nor Islam provide an acceptable historical account of the life and activities of Jesus of Nazareth, and this is my personal opinion.
  4. To be more specific, it was because of their contribution to the evolution of the argument that I termed thekalamcosmological argument ( ” kalam ” being an Arabic term for Islamic philosophy, as you may be aware) for this form of the argument that dates back to the pre-Islamic Christian era.
  5. With my renewed interest in Islam, I decided to include it as one of two side areas of concentration for which I was evaluated for my doctorate in theology at the University of Munich, where I currently reside.
  6. I had no idea at the time that I would one day have the honor of debating Muslim apologists in the United States, Canada, and South Africa, as well as lecturing on Islam and Christianity not only in North America and Europe, but also at Muslim universities in Turkey and Tunisia.
  7. While you are true in that “Allah” is just the Arabic term for God, and that it is used even in the Arabic New Testament, it does not follow, Sultan, that Muslims and Christians share the same notion of God based on common language or phrases.

A similar argument has been made by me, who contends that God’s character as revealed in the New Testament is fundamentally different from God’s character revealed in the Quran.

(III.25; XIX.

The depiction of the historical Jesus, on the other hand, is Islam’s Achilles Heel in the long run.

It is not just that there is not a single shred of evidence in support of this astounding notion, but the evidence in favour of Jesus’ crucifixion is “overwhelming,” as Emory University New Testament expert L.

Johnson puts it (The Real Jesus, p.

In the words of Paula Frederickson, whose bookFrom Jesus to Christ served as inspiration for the PBS special of the same name, “The crucifixion is the most compelling single truth we have about Jesus” (Society of Biblical Literature meeting, November 22, 1999).

We shouldn’t be surprised that the Qur’an was authored by a guy who lived in Arabia 600 years after Jesus and had no independent source of information about him.

Whatever else might be said about Islam, its understanding of Jesus is incorrect, and as a result, this religion cannot be authentic.

Ally: Did Jesus Rise from the Dead?” as well as “Craig vs.

Jewish academics are beginning to acknowledge the historical facts that underpin Jesus’ resurrection, and they are finding it more difficult to explain those facts in any other way than via the resurrection of Jesus.

He also felt that Jesus believed that he was the Messiah, which he did not.

Dr.

Consider my argument with Peter Zaas in Who Was Jesus?

“How can you be so certain when both Islamic and Jewish scholars make the same claim?” you wonder aloud.

Because they are unable to explain the evidence that points to Jesus and Christianity as a whole.

I’d encourage you to have a look at the sites I’ve listed and make your own conclusions. More on Christian theology may be found in Bruce Milne’s Know the Truth, 3rd edition (Downers Grove, IL: Inter-Varsity Press, 2009) or in my own lectures on Christian doctrine, which you can find on my website.

Notes

Dr. William Lane Craig, Research Professor of Philosophy, writes a weekly QA blog article, which you may find here. Question Dr. Craig, good day. Despite your assertion that Christianity is the one genuine religion, I have always been skeptical (based on historical evidence as you say). When both Islamic and Jewish academics make the same assertion, how can you be certain? In my opinion, as a former atheist who has now converted to agnosticism, the question of which religion to adhere to is vitally important.

  1. The religion of Islam states that all people worship the same deity (the term “Allah” does not refer to a particular god for Muslims, but rather to the Arabic word for god).
  2. (And I’d be interested in knowing where you obtain your information about Islamic theology from.) I’m interested in learning more about Christian theology and would appreciate it if you could recommend any good starting literature.
  3. Sultan America is a country in which people live.
  4. William Lane Craig) Response It is Jesus of Nazareth who provides a succinct solution to your inquiry, Sultan, about why Christianity is preferred above Islam or Judaism.
  5. However, what separates them is their interpretation of Jesus.
  6. In my undergraduate studies, I discovered the history of the so-called kalamcosmological argument, which was developed by medieval Muslim theologians like as al-Ghazali, and this piqued my interest in Islamic philosophy.
  7. You may learn more about their contribution to this and other variants of the cosmological argument in my article The Cosmological Argument from Plato to Leibniz (London: Macmillan, 1980).

Throughout my life, I have been fascinated by the teachings of Islam, as well as the systematic history of Islamic theology.

While you are true that “Allah” is just the Arabic term for God, and that it is even used in the Arabic New Testament, it does not follow, Sultan, that Muslims and Christians share the same notion of God based on common language or phrases.

In a similar vein, I have argued that the character of God as revealed in the New Testament is fundamentally different from the character of God as revealed in the Qur’an and the Torah.

(III.25; XIX.

The depiction of the historical Jesus, on the other hand, is Islam’s Achilles’ heel.

It is not just that there is not a single shred of evidence in support of this astounding notion, but the evidence supporting Jesus’ crucifixion is, in the words of Emory University New Testament professor L.

Johnson, “overwhelming” (The Real Jesus, p.

“The crucifixion is the strongest single truth we know about Jesus,” says Paula Frederickson, whose bookFrom Jesus to Christ was the inspiration for a PBS program of the same name (Society of Biblical Literature meeting, November 22, 1999).

We shouldn’t be surprised that the Qur’an was authored by a guy who lived in Arabia 600 years after Jesus and had no independent source of information about him.

No matter what else might be said about Islam, its understanding of Jesus is incorrect, and as a result, this religion cannot be authentic.

Ally: Did Jesus Rise from the Dead?”,” and “Craig vs.

For Judaism, I should reiterate that Jesus’ claims to be the Jewish Messiah, as well as his subsequent resurrection from the grave, are the most important factors to take into consideration.

According to others, one of their number, the late Pinchas Lapide, who I once heard speak at the University of Munich, declared himself persuaded that God the Father resurrected Jesus of Nazareth from the grave.

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MyDoktorvater, Prof.

Wolfhart Pannenberg, observed at the time that Lapide appeared to be unable to make connections between the information he was presented with.

(edited by Craig Evans and Paul Copan) if you’re curious in how a Jewish scholar responds to the evidence.

Why?

Just have a look at the sites I suggested and make up your own mind, I’d say. If you want to learn more about Christian theology, I’d suggest Bruce Milne’s Know the Truth, 3rd edition (Downers Grove, IL: Inter-Varsity Press, 2009) or my own lectures on Christian theory.

William Lane Craig

Dr. William Lane Craig, our Research Professor in Philosophy, writes a weekly QA blog article, which you can read here. Question Good day, Dr. Craig. I’ve always been perplexed by your assertion that Christianity is the only real religion (based on historical evidence as you say). Nevertheless, how can you be so certain when both Islamic and Jewish scholars assert the same claim? As a former atheist who has now converted to agnosticism, the question of which religion to follow is critical. I’m well-versed in Islamic theology, contrary to what you imply.

  • How do you feel about Islam, and what is your perspective on it?
  • Thank you very much.
  • The work of Dr.
  • Judaism, Christianity, and Islam are the world’s three largest monotheistic religions, all of which are genetically related and hence share much in common.
  • Judaism and Islam, in my opinion, do not provide an adequate historical account of the life and activities of Jesus of Nazareth.
  • In fact, it was because of their contribution to the evolution of the argument that I termed this form of the argument, which dates back to the pre-Islamic Christian era, thekalamcosmological argument (” kalam ” being, as you may be aware, the Arabic term for Islamic theology).
  • With my renewed interest in Islam, I decided to include it as one of two side areas of concentration for which I was evaluated for my doctorate in theology at the Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich.

I had no idea at the time that I would one day have the opportunity of debating Muslim apologists in the United States, Canada, and South Africa, as well as teaching on Islam and Christianity not only in North America and Europe, but also at Muslim colleges in Turkey and Tunisia.

As you are aware, no Muslim would acknowledge that God is a Trinity of people as Christians do, and the Qur’an condemns to death those who assert that Jesus is God’s Son, as we Christians do (V.70).

A love that is unconditional and universal characterizes the God of the New Testament, but the God of the Quran has no love for unbelievers and only loves those who are true Muslims (Matthew 5.43-48).

95).

It is odd that the Qur’an chose to dispute the most well-documented truth concerning Jesus, namely, his crucifixion, rather than accept it (IV.157).

T.

125).

Even the most critical opponents in the Jesus Seminar acknowledge the crucifixion of Jesus as “one unassailable truth,” to paraphrase Robert Funk (Jesus Seminar video).

Whatever else one may think about Islam, its understanding of Jesus is incorrect, and as a result, this religion cannot be real.

Ally: Did Jesus Rise from the Dead?”,” and “Craig vs.

Regarding Judaism, I should reiterate that the most important factor to evaluate is Jesus’ claims to be the Jewish Messiah, as well as his subsequent resurrection from the grave.

Indeed, one of their number, the late Pinchas Lapide, who I once heard lecture at the University of Munich, declared himself sure that the God of Israel resurrected Jesus of Nazareth from the grave.

As Prof.

Wolfhart Pannenberg, myDoktorvater, observed at the time, Lapide appeared to be unable to make the necessary connections.

(edited by Craig Evans and Paul Copan) if you’re interested in seeing how a Jewish scholar responds to the evidence.

Why?

I’d encourage you to have a look at the materials I suggested and form your own opinion. For additional information on Christian theology, I think I’d recommend Bruce Milne’s Know the Truth, 3rd ed. (Downers Grove, IL: Inter-Varsity Press, 2009) or my own lectures on Christian theory.

What Is the Most Widely Practiced Religion in the World?

Ghofuur Ferianto is a photographer who works for EyeEm/Getty Images. Most of the world’s principal religions may be divided into two categories: Abrahamic religions such as Christianity, Judaism (including Islam), and Islam; and Indian religions such as Hinduism (including Buddhism), Sikhism (including Hinduism), and others. Christianity is the largest of the world’s main faiths, with more than two billion adherents, making it the largest religion on the planet. Based on the life and teachings of Jesus Christ, Christianity has been around for around 2,000 years, according to historians.

  1. The number of Christians increased over time as the religion expanded over the world, frequently via the efforts of missionaries and invaders.
  2. Beginning in Mecca (a city in modern-day Saudi Arabia) in the 7th century CE, Islam expanded throughout the world under the leadership of the Prophet Muhammad (570–632 CE), whom Muslims believe to be God’s last messenger.
  3. The vast majority of Muslims are members of one of the two major branches of Islam: Sunnis account for around 80 percent of Muslims, while Shi’ahs account for approximately 15 percent.
  4. In terms of population, Hinduism is the third most popular religion in the world, with an estimated 1.1 billion adherents.
  5. Hinduism is largely practiced in India (where around 80 percent of the population identifies as Hindu), Nepal, and Indonesia, with a little presence in other countries.
  6. Over the last several years, certain components of Hinduism, such as the practice of yoga and the usage of chakras (energy centres located throughout the body) to detect and cure sickness, have gained popularity in the Western world.
  7. The religion, which is based on the teachings of Gautama Buddha, was established in India almost 2,500 years ago.

Mahayana Buddhism is a kind of Buddhism that originated in India. One of the major tenets of Buddhism is the vow of nonviolence, as well as a dedication to ethical behavior in all parts of one’s life. According to the number of adherents, the following faiths are the second most generally practiced:

  • Shinttttttttttttttttttt (104 million followers). Shint is a religion that originated in Japan in the eighth century CE and advocates for the existence of multiple gods. It is not a formal religion in the conventional sense, but it serves as the foundation for many cultural activities in Japan
  • Sikhism is not a religion in the traditional sense (25 million followers). Sikhism, which was created in India in the 1500s CE and is based on the teachings of Guru Nanak and his nine successors, is a relatively recent religion when compared to many other faiths. Judaism, on the other hand, has been around for thousands of years (14 million followers). Founded in the Middle East about the 8th century BCE, Judaism has three basic branches: Orthodox Judaism, Conservative Judaism, and Reform Judaism. Orthodox Judaism is the oldest of these three divisions. Despite the fact that they share a same belief system, the branches differ in their interpretation of Scripture and some religious practices
  • Daoism, for example, is a different interpretation of Buddhism (12 million followers). Daoism (also known as Taoism) is a philosophy that originated in China more than 2,000 years ago and is centered on living in harmony with the spontaneous changes of the natural order. One of its first thinkers was a guy named Laozi, who is credited with writing the Daodejing, the basic book of the faith
  • Muism is a branch of Buddhism (10 million followers). This faith, which is one of the world’s oldest, is strongly tied with traditional Korean culture and history, and is also known as Korean Shamanism. It is one of the world’s oldest faiths. Muism’s adherents assert a deep believe in the spirit realm
  • Cao Dai is one such adherent (4.4 million followers). Founded in Vietnam in 1926 by Go Van Chieu, who claimed to have received a message from a deity figure known as the Supreme Being during a séance, Cao Dai is a religious movement. Several other faiths, including Christianity, Judaism, and Daoist philosophy, are included into the religion, which preaches love and peace while opposing intolerance and discrimination.

The Wisdom of Islam and the Foolishness of Christianity — Centre for Muslim-Christian Studies

the word’shint’ comes from the Japanese word for “to shine” (104 million followers). Shint is a religion that originated in Japan in the 8th century CE and advocates for the existence of several gods in the world. The religion of Sikhism is not a formal religion in the conventional sense; rather, it provides a solid foundation for many cultural activities in Japan; it is not to be confused with Hinduism (25 million followers). Sikhism, which was founded in India in the 1500s CE and is based on the teachings of Guru Nanak and his nine successors, is a relatively new religion when compared to many other religions.

  • In the Middle East, this monotheistic religion was created in around the 8th century BCE, and now it is divided into three major branches: Orthodox Judaism, Conservative Judaism, and Reform Judaism.
  • More than 2,000 years ago in China, Daoism (also known as Taoism) emphasizes the importance of living in accordance with the natural order, which is characterized by its spontaneous variations.
  • Known as Korean Shamanism, this religion is one of the world’s oldest and is deeply rooted in traditional Korean culture and history.
  • A deep belief in the spirit realm is professed by Muism’s adherents, according to Cao Dai; (4.4 million followers).
  • Several other faiths, including Christianity, Judaism, and Daoist philosophy, are included into the religion, which preaches love and peace while also encouraging tolerance and acceptance.

Review

Professor Trigg, Senior Research Fellow at the Ian Ramsey Centre at the University of Oxford, reviewed the manuscript. Religious Diversity: Philosophical and Political Dimensions, published by Cambridge University Press in 2014, is his most recent work. This book, written by Australian-based author Richard Shumack, addresses some of the most basic arguments against Christianity raised by Muslim philosophers. Shabbir Akhtar, a British Muslim, raised philosophical challenges to his views, which he addressed specifically.

  • It is a fundamental subject in Shumack’s work that there is a distinction between Christian and Muslim understandings of divine/human relationship.
  • Christians, on the other hand, follow a paradigm known as “fellowship.” The first model considers God to be the supreme being, and mankind to be his servants, who must obey His orders.
  • A few lines of summarization do not do credit to the depth of the conversation or the depth of philosophical insight demonstrated by the participants.
  • Many Islamic academics appear to be uninterested in philosophical debates, which is understandable.
  • Pluralism of the sort advocated by philosopher of religion John Hick might eventually deteriorate into relativism, which rejects the concept of objective reality in favor of subjective truth.
  • Shumack’s discussion of the doctrine of the Trinity, which is included in one of his chapters, is a good example.
  • Christians can claim that this is a misinterpretation.
  • What is true must be true for everyone, regardless of whether or not they embrace it.

The author asserts that “both Christianity and Islam make the confident claim that their respective sacred books contain the accepted and inerrant Word of God.” He goes on to say that He concludes that both must confront the question of how the current Scripture ‘did originate with the evidence from God’ on an equal footing.

  1. The Qur’an is considered to be a direct revelation from God in and of itself.
  2. The Qur’an is regarded as literally God’s Word in its entirety.
  3. Things aren’t true just because they’re written in a book.
  4. The latter, on the other hand, worship a Person rather than a book.
  5. There are certain contrasts between the two religions in this regard.
  6. Human reason is difficult to achieve in the absence of it.
  7. This fundamental concept serves as the foundation for the Western heritage of democracy.
  8. It is also frequently said that Islam is more fatalist than Christianity, accepting everything that happens as Allah’s will.

Although this book demonstrates that an informed and respectful exchange of viewpoints may help each religion comprehend some of the richness of the other, it also demonstrates that each religion can maintain their own ideas about what is true.

4 Differences Between Christianity & Islam

Because we are commemorating Passion Week, which commemorates the week in which Jesus was betrayed, arrested, killed, and resurrected from the grave, this is the most important week of the year for Christians. Easter will be celebrated by millions of people throughout the world, but millions will not. Muslims, for example, are a significant minority who will not participate. Christianity and Islam are the two most significant faiths in the world (Pew Research Center). Based on my study and discussion with a local Muslim leader, Nadeem A.

  • 1) A Different Point of View on the Holy Scriptures Christians consider both the Old and New Testaments to be the inspired Word of God.
  • The term Quran literally translates as’recitation.’ Muslims assert that the Quran has been maintained in its precise, original form in Arabic because vast groups of people would repeat it to other big groups of people without making any changes to the text.
  • Muslims assert that there is no variance in any text of the Quran written in Arabic.
  • Textual criticism has ensured that our English Bibles are remain trustworthy and sacred in today’s world.
  • Muslims believe the Quran was produced when the prophet Muhammad received revelations from the angel Gabriel during a 23-year period beginning in 609 AD, which is when the prophet Muhammad was born.
  • 2) A Different Perspective on God Christians believe in the Trinity, which is composed of three persons: God is one God who exists in three persons: God the Father, God the Son, and God the Holy Spirit (Matthew 28:19-20; 2 Corinthians 13:14; John 10:30).
  • Some texts from the Quran that demonstrate how the God of Islam is not a father are provided below.
  • The Supreme Being, or the Absolute God.
  • He was not born, nor was He conceived.
  • In the Quran (Surah 25:23), Jesus from a Different Point of View Believers in Jesus Christ believe that he is God (John 10:30).
  • Islam would assert that Jesus was born of a virgin and that He was exalted to the throne of God in Heaven (Surah 4:158).
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In the words of Nabeel Jabour, “They (Muslims) believe that God intervened miraculously and brought Jesus up to Himself, and that someone else was crucified on the crucifixion in his stead.” Even though it looked to the Jews that the figure was Jesus, he turned out to be someone else entirely.

  • Despite the fact that Muslims have a great esteem for Jesus, they do not think He is God (How Muslims View Easter).
  • A ‘clean slate’ is what Muslims believe you have when you are born, according to their belief system.
  • According to DiscoveringIslam.org, “the idea of original sin is unjust.because no one should be forced to carry the weight of another’s wrongdoing or error.” As far as Islam is concerned, Satan is solely accountable for sin, and Adam and the rest of creation are not cursed.
  • One of the most fundamental truths of Christianity is that, while we inherited Adam’s sinful character, we were given a new nature through Jesus Christ (Romans 5:12-21).
  • Where Adam fell short, Jesus rose to the occasion by living a sinless life, dying on the cross and carrying the punishment for our sins, and rising from the dead again and again (I Corinthians 15:21-22).

If you’re a Christian, as Easter Sunday approaches, embrace your faith as it is revealed in God’s Word. Take comfort in the fact that God cared about you so profoundly that He sent His Son to die on the cross in your place.

Is Allah of Islam the same as Yahweh of Christianity?

On my way to work in Columbia, South Carolina, I passed the State House, where the Confederate flag was floating in the air behind a big, festively decorated Christmas tree. The contrast between the two symbols drew my attention. To the majority of people, the Christmas tree theoretically represents the holiday season and the emphasis on the first arrival of Jesus Christ. For them, any depiction of a spiritual reality on public property is a blatant violation of their constitutional rights. The flag, on the other hand, has grown increasingly contentious.

  • As a result, we have a single symbol that may be used to represent multiple different things.
  • In a similar vein, for some Christians, Allah is simply another name for the one and only God who created the entire universe.
  • The question before us, therefore, is whether the titles “Allah” and “Yahweh” are just two distinct names for the same God, or if they refer to two separate Gods altogether.
  • Allah is most likely derived from the Aramaic compound phrase “al-ilah,” which literally translates as “the deity.” It is a general name for the supreme deity of the people, and it has been in use in Arabia for hundreds of years prior to Muhammad’s arrival on the scene.
  • Allah had three daughters in the pre-Islamic era, namely Al-At, Al-Uzza, and Al-Manat, and they were all named Al-At.
  • The Allah of the Qur’an, on the other hand, is a radically different being from the Yahweh of the Old Testament.
  • I don’t think it’s feasible to get to know him personally.

Indeed, for Muslims, Allah is the only being who may exist without any partners.

Last but not least, even for the most devoted Muslim, there is no assurance of redemption, for Allah has the authority to reject the believer’s good actions and send him to hell at his discretion.

Yahweh, however, the God of the Bible, is a distinct sort of deity, as we will explore in this article.

God instructed Moses to address him as “I am that I am,” or in Hebrew, “Yahweh,” at that time.

When the Jews learned that Jesus was referring to himself as God, they seized upon the opportunity to stone him for what they considered to be blasphemy against God.

However, this cannot be claimed of the Muslim God since Muslims deny Jesus’ divinity and, as a result, deny most of what the New Testament teaches about him.

While Allah is seen as being too sacred to have personal interactions with humans, Yahweh is frequently depicted as a loving God who is concerned about our particular troubles.

The Father of Jesus can be defined as God’s father since there is unity in the Trinity despite the fact that God is one God who exists in three distinct persons.

Furthermore, both religions assert that God has sent prophets to disclose His will and to produce texts to serve as a guide for our daily lives.

For starters, their characteristics are distinct from one another.

Furthermore, because his strength is more essential than his other traits, there is an uneven focus placed on power in relation to his other attributes as well.

Yahweh, on the other hand, is by nature a triune oneness, and as a result, his characteristics are derived from his nature.

And because his characteristics are founded on his immutable nature rather than his strong will, all of his characteristics are equal and serve to foster trustworthiness rather than capriciousness.

Second, Christians believe that God’s essence is triune (Father, Son, and Holy Spirit), which is the only way that Jesus Christ, as the second person of the Trinity, could suffer on the cross in order to pay the penalty for our sins.

Muslims, on the other hand, do not believe that Jesus died on the cross and do not believe in his resurrection from the dead, according to the Bible.

According to them, Jesus cannot be God, and God cannot be a father, because he does not have a son.

But, hold on a minute, some may argue.

Do they have a case?

The Arabic Christians believe that “Allah” is the father of Jesus, and they think that “Allah” is triune, which is why they refer to him as “Father of Jesus” in their translation of the Bible.

Remembering that words have both a denotative and a connotative meaning might help to clear up this semantic strangling problem.

The connotation of a word, on the other hand, is determined by what a person believes about the object of the word.

As a result, the word “allah” is essentially a denotative term that refers to “god, divinity, etc.” Our connotative presuppositions, on the other hand, help us to grasp the denotative application.

Even if the denotation of the words is the same, there is a world of difference between the substance of the words (connotation).

If you look at the names Allah and Yahweh in the Qur’an and the Bible, it should be clear that they cannot both be referring to the same God.

According to the Law of Non-Contradiction, none of these can be true at the same time.

One thing should be clear, however: the God of Muhammad cannot be the same God as the God of Jesus Christ. Daniel Janosik is an Adjunct Faculty member (Apologetics) at Columbia International University in New York. Permalink|Comment|Leave a reply» Description

Muslim and Christian Beliefs and Practices in Israel

In general, most Muslims in Israel claim to adhere to the fundamental principles of their religion. Muslims, for example, fast during the holy month of Ramadan, and nearly two-thirds donate zakat (an yearly contribution of a percentage of one’s wealth to the poor or to a mosque), according to the Pew Research Center’s Muslim Insights survey. Christians in Israel are likewise typically devout adherents to their religious beliefs. Among other things, a great majority of those surveyed claim to have received the annual sacrament of holy oil, which is closely identified with Orthodox Christianity but which is also practiced by the vast majority of Catholics in Israel.

Druze are often noted for being reserved when it comes to discussing their religious views and customs.

Considering that many Druze have not taken initiation, it is possible that they may not have a thorough understanding of their faith.

More information about the Druze may be found in the sidebar later in this chapter.

Most Israeli Muslims fast during Ramadan, give zakat

When asked whether they pay zakat (a proportion of their income to a mosque or charity) and whether they fast during the holy month of Ramadan, Israeli Muslims responded affirmatively. These are two of the Five Pillars of Islam, and as such, they may be used to determine whether or not a religion is being observed. 19 Muslims of all ages, including younger and older Muslims, men and women, and those with all degrees of education, claim to be involved in these traditions. Muslim women in Israel, on the other hand, are somewhat more likely than Muslim males to report that they fast throughout Ramadan (89 percent vs.

Younger Muslims (those between the ages of 18 and 49) are also less likely than their elders to observe the fast (81 percent vs.

Most Orthodox, Catholic Christians in Israel have been anointed with holy oil

The great majority of Christians in Israel, like the vast majority of Muslims, adhere to at least a few fundamental components of their faith. The vast majority of Christians in Israel (94 percent) claim to have been baptized in the Christian faith. Additionally, the majority (81 percent) say they have icons of saints or other holy people in their homes, and the majority (83 percent) claim they have been anointed with holy oil, which is a ceremony conducted annually or in the case of illness.

According to the Christian community in Israel, 39 percent of Christians give tithes.

According to the Pew Research Center, 37 percent of Orthodox Christians and 34 percent of Catholics tithe.

The Bible is considered to be the inspired word of God by the vast majority of Israeli Christians (89 percent), including the vast majority of Orthodox Christians and Catholics.

The frequency with which Catholics attend to confession was also inquired about. In Israel, around three out of every ten Catholics claim they go to confession at least once or twice a year. However, the bulk of people (68 percent) claim they go to confession just sometimes or never.

Similar shares of Muslims, Christians anticipating Jesus’ return

Muslims and Christians were asked if they believe Jesus would return to Earth within their lives, as part of the study. Despite the fact that Muhammad is considered as the final prophet in Islam, Muslims also see Jesus as a prophet, with 32 percent of Muslims in Israel believing that Jesus would return to Earth within their lives. A larger proportion (49 percent) believes that this will not happen, while 18 percent say they don’t know or don’t have an opinion on the subject at all. Christians are divided into three groups: those who believe Jesus will return during their lifetimes (32 percent), those who believe Jesus will not return during their lifetimes (37 percent), and those who do not have a clear opinion on the subject (31 percent ).

Most Muslims say Islam is the one true faith leading to eternal life

Muslim and Christian respondents were asked which of the following statements best represented their point of view: “My religion is the only authentic faith leading to everlasting life,” or “Many religions can lead to eternal life,” according to the results of the study. The majority of Muslim Israelis believe that their faith is the only true one leading to eternal life in paradise, but Christians are less likely to believe this. This is the belief of the vast majority of Muslims (57 percent), whereas one-third (33 percent) believe that numerous religions can lead to eternal life.

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In terms of believing that theirs is the only genuine faith leading to eternal life in heaven, Orthodox Christians and Catholics are almost equally inclined to have this belief; around four-in-ten individuals in both denominations hold this belief.

17 surprising similarities between Muslims and Christians

Muslim and Christian respondents were asked which of the following statements best represented their point of view: “My religion is the one genuine faith leading to everlasting life,” or “Many religions can lead to eternal life,” according to the results of the study. The majority of Muslim Israelis believe that their faith is the only genuine one leading to eternal life in paradise, but Christians are less likely to believe such. One-third of Muslims (33 percent) believe that numerous faiths may lead to eternal life, while a majority of Muslims (57 percent) believe that no religion can.

In terms of believing that theirs is the one genuine faith leading to eternal life in heaven, Orthodox Christians and Catholics are almost equally inclined to have this belief; around four out of ten individuals in both faiths hold this belief.

In spite of their differences, Jews, Christians and Muslims worship the same God

According to popular belief, Allah is a violent, warlike deity, in contrast to the God of Christianity and Judaism who is viewed as a loving, merciful deity of compassion and kindness. However, despite the obvious variations in the way their religions are practiced, Jews, Christians, and Muslims all worship the same God, according to the Bible. Muhammad, the creator of Islam, considered himself to be the last in a line of prophets that stretched back through Jesus to Moses, beyond him to Abraham, and all the way back to the biblical patriarch Noah.

  1. Consequently, given that Muhammad inherited both Jewish and Christian conceptions of God, it is not unexpected that the God of Muhammad, Jesus and Moses is a complex and ambiguous figure, with qualities such as kindness and compassion, as well as wrath and rage.
  2. Nonetheless, you didn’t want to get on his bad side.
  3. His anger and punishment would fall on those who failed to find the way or, having found it, failed to pursue it in the first place.
  4. Images courtesy of Wikimedia Commons The Torah, according to Jewish tradition, contains the whole revelation of God (the first five books of the Old Testament).
  5. When he instructed Abraham to give his son as a burned sacrifice to God, he went well beyond the call of duty.
  6. 450 prophets of the ancient Canaanite god Baal were slaughtered by Elijah, and he gave his approval.
  7. He cherished Israel in the same way a father cherished his kid.

Hans Meling’s painting, Christ Bestowing His Blessing (1478).

The prayer that Jesus delivered to his followers, on the one hand, talked of a personal God, addressing him as “Father,” while on the other, Jesus spoke of a universal God.

Jesus preached doom and gloom, just as the prophets of the Old Testament had done.

God would appear at the end of history to deliver judgment.

The lucky few would be granted perpetual bliss, while the evil majority would be sent into the endless fires of hell, where they would burn forever.

God would act in the manner of a God of justice at the end of the world.

As a result, God would reward or punish each individual in the gardens of paradise or the fiery depths of hell, depending on their behavior.

Those who had been saved would be rewarded with the pleasures of heaven.

They would be taken directly to heaven.

First and foremost, submission (“islam” in Arabic) to God, adherence to his instructions as revealed in the Quran, and devotion to God’s apostle Muhammad were required for eternal salvation.

When it came to marriage and family law, women, inheritance, food and drink, worship and purity, warfare, punishments for adultery and false charges of adultery, alcohol, and theft, the Quran gave (often contradictory) direction to the believing community.

Muslims, Christians, and Jews are all devotees of the same complicated deity, Allah.

This is the point at when they came to be together.

The fact that one religion is true while another is false leads to inevitable conflict between believers and nonbelievers, between those who have been chosen and those who have been rejected, between those who are saved and those who have been condemned.

Intolerance and violence are sown in this place. As a result, the God of Muhammad, like the God of Jesus and Moses, is a source of contention both within and within these religions as much as he is a source of unification.

If Islam Is a Religion of Violence, So Is Christianity

When asked about the Orlando massacres after “appreciating the congrats,” Donald Trump argued that it was not an assault weapon but radical Islam that was responsible for the deaths at Pulse, since in Trump Tower, it is impossible to have it both ways. The universe of Donald Trump is binary. It is a zero-sum game: Either firearms or radical Islam are responsible for the deaths of individuals. In that planet, only one religion may be considered bad, and as a result, Christianity is considered good and Islam is considered bad.

  • Islam is intolerant, but Christianity is tolerant.
  • In this viewpoint, folks who are Trump fans and those who are not Trump supporters are all on the same page.
  • Notably, the term “Manichean” was initially used to designate a religion that spread from Persia to the eastern and northern African sections of Roman Empire in the third century, and which had an impact on many early Christians in the process.
  • And I mean it in the most harsh way: Members of a Manichean-influenced Christian sect had their belongings confiscated and were put to death, even if they converted to a more traditional form of Christianity while maintaining communication with their Manichean connections.
  • Augustine urged them to pursue a zealous campaign of persecution.
  • The universe of Donald Trump is binary.
  • In that planet, only one religion may be considered bad, and as a result, Christianity is considered good and Islam is considered bad.

Islam is intolerant, but Christianity is tolerant.

In this viewpoint, folks who are Trump fans and those who are not Trump supporters are all on the same page.

Notably, the term “Manichean” was initially used to designate a religion that spread from Persia to the eastern and northern African sections of Roman Empire in the third century, and which had an impact on many early Christians in the process.

And I mean it in the most harsh way: Members of a Manichean-influenced Christian sect had their belongings confiscated and were put to death, even if they converted to a more traditional form of Christianity while maintaining communication with their Manichean connections.

Augustine urged them to pursue a zealous campaign of persecution.

More and more, I’m becoming weary of seeing people say that Christianity is fundamentally peaceful.

I was in the audience.

With all due respect to my many Christian friends, I respectfully submit that we are in disagreement.

— or the Manicheans, conservatives are likely to roll their eyes, yet both are important, especially if you’re attempting to show that faiths have intrinsic qualities.

In order to demonstrate that one religion is inherently violent based on the following historical instances, you must first acknowledge and acknowledge the violent past of Christianity before dismissing it as an exception to the norm.

As Crusaders slogged southeastward on their hundredth expedition to the Holy Land, they massacred the Jews who stood in their way time and time again, according to legend.

After centuries of persecution, the Crusaders massacred so many Jews in the name of their Christian beliefs that it was the most devastating demographic blow to European Jewry until the Holocaust came along.

You may read about the harsh suppression of Manichean Christians in the Catholic Encyclopedia (a magazine that “chronicles what Catholic artists, educators, poets, scientists, and men of action have accomplished in their many provinces”) if you don’t believe me.

It took hundreds of years after Martin Luther nailed his 95 theses to a church door, unintentionally creating a new wing of Christianity, for Christians to stop fighting each other and stop spilling each other’s blood in the belief that their vision of Christ was the most accurate to come into being.

According to Donald Trump, radical Islam is “anti-women, anti-gay, and anti-American.

“I will not allow America to become a nation where homosexual people, Christian people, and Jews are targets of persecution and intimidation by radical Islamic preachers of hate and violence.” He was attempting to make the point that supporters of extreme Islam (whatever that may be) are so uncomfortable with individuals who do not share their ideas that they are unable to refrain from retaliating against them violently.

Despite the fact that radical Islam is all of these things and more, Christianity’s record isn’t any better.

Jewish life in Muslim nations, despite the fact that it was nevertheless burdened with a slew of restrictions and demands to dress in amusing attire, as well as intermittent violence, was far less bloody than in the sophisticated Christian West.

As an alternative, consider July 1988, the thousandth anniversary of Russia’s Baptism, which occurred on the same day as the baptism of Christ: Rumors spread around Moscow that a pogrom would be held to commemorate the day Christianity was introduced to the country, and that the authorities were sending out the addresses of Jews to the general public.

  1. Then there’s the very current phenomena known as the Trump troll, who often denigrates me as a “Christ murderer” who deserves anti-Semitism for “mocking the Gospel,” among other things.
  2. And, while Trump expresses concern about Jewish people being persecuted by “radical Islamic lecturers,” it is not extreme Muslims that I am concerned about as a Jew living in the United States.
  3. It originates with Trump’s white, Christian base of followers.
  4. Trump, on the other hand, does not address them and surely does not reject them.
  5. Only for extreme Muslims, of course.

It is conservative Christians who have demonstrated the most anti-gay sentiment in this country over decades of peddling hatred for gay people, comparing homosexuality to pedophilia and bestiality, claiming that AIDS is divine punishment, pushing “cure” for homosexuality, and opposing laws that would prevent gays from being discriminated against not only in marriage but in other aspects of their lives.

A Christian preacher, who has enjoyed the company of politicians such as Bobby Jindal, Mike Huckabee, and Ted Cruz, recently stated that gays “deserve the death penalty” according to the Bible.

Nonetheless, in the aftermath of the Orlando tragedy, several Christians came forward to express their true feelings towards the gays who were present at the club.

Lastly, there are the zealous American Christians who directly equate Christianity with firearms, who stockpile weapons like there’s no tomorrow, yet who are nevertheless awestruck by the warlike Saracens.

One year ago today, Dylann Roof opened fire on nine people during a Bible study in Charleston, South Carolina, killing him and injuring nine others.

Roof was raised in a church-going household and attended a Christian summer camp, according to some sources.

They are not outliers, nor do they allude to an underlying violence in Christian doctrine and practice.

It isn’t the case.

Islam, on the other hand, is not.

None of the world’s religions is fundamentally peaceful or violent, and none of them is inherently anything other than what its adherents portray it to be.

It is extremely convenient for both the perpetrator of violence and the accuser, yet it is completely ineffective: Someone who has transgressed can be dealt with, but what can be done with an idea that is amorphous in nature?

Islam, as it was practiced in medieval Spain, was not only beautiful, but it was also peaceful.

It is also possible for Judaism, which is associated with either consumptive erudition or insularity, to become aggressive.

To my fellow Muslims who are blaming Muslims for their homophobia, let us recall Yishai Schlissel, who stabbed six people at a homosexual pride march in Jerusalem, marking his second attack on an LGBT event in the city.

Do you remember him, the person who shot and killed 29 Muslims while they were praying?

Even Buddhism, which many people believe to be the epitome of calm, can be a brutal religion at times.

No religion is fundamentally violent in its teachings.

It is typically in the interpretation of religion, regardless of the faith, that we perceive either beauty or ugliness — or, more often, if we are grown enough to think in nuanced ways, anything in between. Credit: ERIC ANTHONY JOHNSON/Getty Images for the image

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